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Would you buy a matching sofa and dog bed?

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Owning a pet has become quite a thing during lockdown, with animal-lovers willing to fork out substantial sums of money to add a furry friend to their home.

Take the price of puppies, which surged to more than £3,000 for some breeds last year, as people working from home or furloughed sought canine company.

For pet owners with deep pockets, who are eager to take indulging their pets – and themselves – to a new level, there is now the chance to purchase matching sofas and pet beds.

Would you buy a matching sofa and dog bed? These mustard coloured dog beds and human sofas (below) are from Made.com

Would you buy a matching sofa and dog bed? These mustard coloured dog beds and human sofas (below) are from Made.com

The Moby designs from Made.com are available  at £179 for the dog bed and £449 for the sofa

The Moby designs from Made.com are available  at £179 for the dog bed and £449 for the sofa

Amid the growing demand for pets, fashionable furniture company Made.com has launched a range of cat and dog beds that match its most popular sofas.

It means a pet owner can ensure their interior design scheme can remain coordinated despite the new furry addition to their home.

The millennial favourite says its pet furniture means that animals can lounge in comfort, just like their owners.

Guido Spranzi, of Made.com, said: ‘Our pets are considered part of the family, therefore why shouldn’t they be treated to a place to rest that is as stylish as their human’s?

‘These on-trend pet beds are the perfect solution for style conscious homeowners who not only want to spoil their furry friends with a luxe place to snooze, but also want to ensure their interior remains chic.’

The pet beds mean that cats and dogs can curl up on a miniature version of what their owners can be sat on.

Remember the costs of owning a pet 

Some new pet owners have been forced to rehome their new cats or dogs, after realising how much commitment they are or having run into financial difficulties due to the pandemic. 

Before getting a dog or any other pet, make sure you have fully researched the commitments and the costs. 

From luxury pet beds to fashion-forward wardrobes, customised food plans and even their own Instagram accounts, it seems that there’s nothing that owners won’t do to make their pampered pets feel right at home.

Danielle Bayliss, of Quintain Living – which offers pet-friendly homes to rent in London’s Wembley Park – said: ‘We’ve welcomed quite a number of new four legged residents during lockdown with their owners enjoying the mental and physical benefits of adding a dog to the family, myself included. 

‘Unlike some rental properties, pets are welcome at Quintain Living and with the host of amenities and services available for pampered pooches, it’s quite simply a dog’s life.’

It comes after the Government published its new Model Tenancy Agreement, including a bid to encourage landlords to accept tenants with pets.

The move was announced a year ago, but the template tenancy agreement has only now been published and is ready to use. 

It can be used as the basis of agreements with tenants. 

We take a look at the matching sofas and dog beds…

The Kooper dog bed from Made.com costs £129 and is a mini version of the same £449 design created for humans

The Kooper dog bed from Made.com costs £129 and is a mini version of the same £449 design created for humans

Matching human sofas and dog beds: The Kooper has smooth curves, velvet upholstery and slim brass legs

Matching human sofas and dog beds: The Kooper has smooth curves, velvet upholstery and slim brass legs

The three styles include the Kooper dog bed that costs £129, almost a third of the human version with the same name, which costs £449.

The Kooper has smooth curves, velvet upholstery and slim brass legs, which its manufacturers says is a good fit for cats, mini dachshunds, pugs and small terriers.

The Moby in pink velvet costs £449 for the sofa, which has the added benefit of folding down into a sofabed

The Moby in pink velvet costs £449 for the sofa, which has the added benefit of folding down into a sofabed

The Moby in pink velvet costs £179 for the dog bed, which has a padded seat and angled copper legs

The Moby in pink velvet costs £179 for the dog bed, which has a padded seat and angled copper legs

Another style is the Moby in pink velvet, which costs £179 for the dog bed and £449 for the sofa.

The dog bed has a padded seat and angled copper legs, and is aimed at border collies or springer spaniels, according to its designers.

 A smaller version costing £129 is also available for smaller cats and dogs, including jack russells, French bull dogs or beagles.

The Kolton in Marl Grey is the cheapest pet bed offered at Made.com, and it costs £99

The Kolton in Marl Grey is the cheapest pet bed offered at Made.com, and it costs £99

The Kolton has a quilted shape and dark stain legs, and it is aimed at cats and medium-sized dogs.

 The Kolton has a quilted shape and dark stain legs, and it is aimed at cats and medium-sized dogs.

And finally, the Kolton in Marl Grey is the cheapest pet bed in the range at £99. It compares to £449 for the chair.

The Kolton has a quilted shape and dark stain legs, and it is aimed at cats and medium-sized dogs.   

Using washable dog blankets 

Faux-fur dog blankets by Charley Chau

Faux-fur dog blankets by Charley Chau

A quick and practical solution to keeping your sofa – and your pet’s bed – free from muddy paws during the winter months is by using a blanket.

Christine Chau, of dog bed and blanket company Charley Chau, said: ‘Blankets are a great way to luxe-up a dog bed, adding cosiness and warmth. But they’re also brilliantly practical. Our canine companions pick up quite a lot of dirt and muck through the day that they take back to bed with them on their paws and in their coats. 

‘It’s much easier to throw a blanket into the wash on a regular basis than it is to strip the covers off a dog bed every week – or your sofa. Keep at least one blanket as a spare so you don’t need to rush a wash through, and choose a style that works with the interior scheme around your dog’s bed. Dog blankets don’t have to be dull and boring.’

Charley Chau’s collection of £75 faux-fur dog blankets are soft and are machine washable too. If you’re looking for something less extravagant, there is the £45 Charley Chau double fleece blanket, which is made with from a soft fleece.



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British ex-pat, 67, is forced to DESTROY his Spanish home two months after his wife died from cancer

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A British ex-pat has been forced to knock down his £130,000 Spanish home two months after his wife died from cancer.

But the situation for 67-year-old Gurney Davey, from Suffolk, could get worse because he is facing six months in prison after a mayor illegally gave him planning permission for the house.

‘I was distraught at first, my blood pressure was sky high and then I lost my wife,’ Mr Davey said this week as he was demolishing his home near Tolox, Malaga.

Gurney Davey, 67, has been forced to knock down his £130,000 Spanish home two months after his wife died from cancer

Gurney Davey, 67, has been forced to knock down his £130,000 Spanish home two months after his wife died from cancer

Despite Friday’s demolition also costing him €1,600, he added that it had actually come as ‘some sort of relief’ having fought the legal battle since 2004, over the house he built in 2003. 

It was then that legal firm, Manzanares, informed him he would be getting a licence for an ‘almacen’ (or storeroom), which would allow him to build the house.

‘We thought we had done everything right. We got legal advice and went through a lawyer in order to get permission to build the home,’ Davey explained. 

But he was later told that his house was one of around 350 that were illegally given planning permission by the former mayor, Juan Vera, who was eventually handed a prison sentence of his own.

Mr Davey was told his house had to be demolished for himself to avoid a six-month prison sentence, with the news coming just after his wife, Diana, died from bowel cancer at the age of 71.

‘Diana fought breast cancer for six years before bowel cancer – I am sure the stress brought it on.’ 

‘But thankfully it is now over,’ he explained. ‘It has been going on for so long now, I’ve finally come to terms with what needs to be done. 

‘Having it demolished was actually a relief,’ he added.

As he still owns the land, he can still live on it – just not in a house.

Despite Friday's demolition also costing him €1,600, he added that it had actually come as 'some sort of relief' having fought the legal battle since 2004, over the house be built in 2003. Pictured: Mr Davey's home in Spain before it was demolished on Friday

Despite Friday’s demolition also costing him €1,600, he added that it had actually come as ‘some sort of relief’ having fought the legal battle since 2004, over the house be built in 2003. Pictured: Mr Davey’s home in Spain before it was demolished on Friday

Mr Davey was told that his house was one of around 350 that were illegally given planning permission by the former mayor, Juan Vera, who was eventually handed a prison sentence. Pictured: Mr Davey's home in Spain after it was demolished on Friday

Mr Davey was told that his house was one of around 350 that were illegally given planning permission by the former mayor, Juan Vera, who was eventually handed a prison sentence. Pictured: Mr Davey’s home in Spain after it was demolished on Friday

Now, the father-of-three is planning a minimalist life staying in a converted van, so that his five dogs still have the space to roam.

‘This land is my home, it is my life and these dogs are all I have left.’

Whether or not he still faces a prison sentence, is yet to be confirmed.

The ex-pat only found out about the potential six-month sentence when a court document was delivered to a neighbour’s house.

‘I went straight to Tolox town hall with it. They told me I shouldn’t have received it yet,’ he recalled. ‘They said they were going to be sending the notification to me once they had stamped it.’

He had never been told about the court case that followed on from a Guardia Civil denuncia for an ‘illegal build’, but Davey’s two-bed home should never have been built according to the Malaga court.

Now, the father-of-three is planning a minimalist life staying in a converted van, so that his five dogs (pictured) still have the space to roam

Now, the father-of-three is planning a minimalist life staying in a converted van, so that his five dogs (pictured) still have the space to roam

In 2016, and then again in 2017, Davey was ordered to knock down his house, but, in common with a neighbour, he waited for more details.

While his Spanish neighbour, Irene Millan, 29, did eventually hear from the court again, she was given six months to ‘legalise’ her property – an option Davey was never given.

However, his neighbour’s apparent good luck turned into a poisoned chalice.

Having spent €20,000 with the town hall to legalise the dwelling, the court finally refused to accept the new paperwork provided by the council.

Instead, demolition was ordered – which went ahead last week.

To add insult to injury Irene’s 54-year-old father, Manuel Millan, whose name was on the deeds, was also sentenced to six months jail and handed a fine of €6 a day for a year.

Whether or not he still faces a prison sentence, is yet to be confirmed. The ex-pat only found out about the potential six-month sentence when a court document was delivered to a neighbour's house

Whether or not he still faces a prison sentence, is yet to be confirmed. The ex-pat only found out about the potential six-month sentence when a court document was delivered to a neighbour’s house

As he still owns the land, he can still live on it - just not in a house. Pictured: Mr Davey, a former builder, uses a JCB digger to demolish his own home

As he still owns the land, he can still live on it – just not in a house. Pictured: Mr Davey, a former builder, uses a JCB digger to demolish his own home

The couple, originally from Suffolk in the UK, spent £130,000 building their property.

‘It came as a package – a plot with a new home on it.’

Davey admits he and his wife were perhaps naive to follow the advice of their lawyer.

The lawyer, from legal firm Manzanares, told them that planning permission would be applied for as an almacen – or ‘warehouse’.

Mr Davey (pictured) was told his house had to be demolished for himself to avoid a six-month prison sentence, with the news coming just after his wife, Diana, died from bowel cancer at the age of 71

Mr Davey (pictured) was told his house had to be demolished for himself to avoid a six-month prison sentence, with the news coming just after his wife, Diana, died from bowel cancer at the age of 71

This way it would come under the remit of Tolox town hall, which would give permission and later they could ‘legalise’ the property.

The language of one legal letter suggests this would be a mere formality, but the property never got legalised.

In fact, the Tolox mayor of the time, Juan Vera, has since been jailed and fined for his part in a scheme.

In most cases the mayor used the very same ‘lax’ procedure of applying to build an ‘almacen’ to try to keep the prying eyes of the Junta authorities away.

‘We thought that was the way things worked in Spain,’ said Davey, a retired builder. ‘We went to see a lawyer and got advice. It turns out that was not the smart thing to do.

‘Why would we deliberately try to build illegally? It makes no sense that we would sell up everything in the UK and risk it all.’

Mr Davey had earlier said that he was forced to ask the town hall for permission to knock his own property down.

‘I will do it myself. I will borrow a JCB from someone and flatten my home of the past 17 years. I will not let the town hall do it and charge me more money.’

It is not the first time British expats have had their homes demolished in Andalucia, with the Priors, in Almeria, the most famous victims.

They still live in the garage of their house today, over 10 years since the house was knocked down in Vera. 

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Two teenagers died after separate incidents in Dublin and Waterford

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Two teenagers have died after separate incidents in Dublin and Waterford on Wednesday.

Gardaí in Ballyfermot responded to a call at an equestrian centre at Tay Lane, Co Dublin, at about 2pm.

Dublin Fire Brigade and the National Ambulance Service attended the scene and provided medical assistance to a 15-year-old girl who was injured during an exercise event.

She was removed to Children’s Health Ireland at Crumlin, where she later died.

Gardaí said the coroner has been notified. The Health and Safety Authority (HSA) has also been notified and will carry out an examination on Thursday.

Gardaí said investigations are ongoing. A file will be prepared for the Coroner’s Court.

Separately, gardaí and emergency services attended the scene of a workplace accident in Dungarvan, Co Waterford on Wednesday afternoon.

A boy was pronounced dead at the scene.

The HSA has been notified and will carry out an investigation. A file will be prepared for the coroner.

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Tritax EuroBox acquires Swedish logistics property for €47m

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Tritax EuroBox continues to expand its presence in the Swedish market with a €47m acquisition. The asset held freehold has a total gross internal area of approximately 28,900m² and comprises two purpose-built logistics facilities (one of 16,200m² and the other 12,700m²), located in the heart of the prime logistics location in the Port of Gothenburg. 

 

The Port of Gothenburg has been ranked as the most attractive logistics location in the Nordics for 20 years by Intelligent Logistik, the leading Nordic logistics media platform. There are currently no vacant logistics buildings in the port area. The Port is home to Scandinavia’s largest container terminal, which is forecast to grow over the coming years. The buildings are fully let to Agility AB, Nordicon AB and Vink Essaplast Group AB, generating a total annual rent of €1.79m on leases with a weighted average unexpired lease term of six years.  The rent reflects a rate of €62.50psm per annum.  All leases are annually indexed to 100% of Swedish CPI.

 

Nick Preston, Fund Manager of Tritax EuroBox, commented: “We are delighted to acquire our first asset in the Nordics which aligns with our disciplined investment approach and our long term strategic goals. The asset held freehold is located in the region’s strongest logistics market and offers asset management upside through working closely with the occupiers to achieve their business plans and increase rents to market levels. We expect to see continued strong market rental growth in the Port of Gothenburg, due to the natural constraint of land supply in the port area, and the increasing demand from occupiers. The Port of Gothenburg has a clear plan for growth, with significant infrastructure investment committed, further strengthening this location.”

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