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Two-bedroom flat in country mansion that looks just like the White House goes on sale for £2M

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A two-bedroom flat located in a country mansion which bears more than a passing resemblance to the White house has gone on sale for £2million south London.   

The Mansion at Sundridge Park near Bromley, is now on the market with Knight Frank. 

Sundridge Park mansion has been restored and turned into 22 apartments. Six of the flats are on sale and the one which costs £2million is a two-bedroom duplex with ‘impressive’ original features.   

The building is based on the design of a Renaissance temple and is set within sweeping gardens that are around 12 miles south of Charing Cross. 

Of the other apartments on sale in the building, two cost £900,000, one costs £1.15million, another costs £1.25million, another is on sale for £1.4million and the other costs £1.9million.  

The enormous home is in a country house that bears more than a passing resemblance to the southern facade of the US Government capital 

The Mansion at Sundridge Park near Bromley, south London, is on the market with Knight Frank

The Mansion at Sundridge Park near Bromley, south London, is on the market with Knight Frank

Sundridge Park mansion has been restored and turned into 22 apartments. The only on sale is a two-bedroom duplex with 'impressive' original features

Sundridge Park mansion has been restored and turned into 22 apartments. The only on sale is a two-bedroom duplex with ‘impressive’ original features

A listing by estate agents Knight Frank reads: ‘The Mansion at Sundridge Park is an exquisite country house fashioned in the form of a Renaissance temple and set within a sweeping landscape of sculptured gardens and woodland walks.

‘This two-bedroom duplex has many impressive original features and benefits from two terraces and access to delightful gardens and woodland.

‘Approaching 3,500 square feet, this unique apartment is spread over two floors, and incorporates The Mansion’s original solid timber, circular, wine cellar.

‘The exceptional drawing room, with three sets of French doors on to one of the apartment’s terraces, has an array of original features including restored shutters and windows, beautiful ceilings with ornate plasterwork, restored wall panelling and an impressive oak fireplace with decorative surround.’

The building is based on the design of a Renaissance temple and is set within sweeping gardens that are around 12 miles south of Charing Cross. The duplex features an open plan kitchen and dining room

The building is based on the design of a Renaissance temple and is set within sweeping gardens that are around 12 miles south of Charing Cross. The duplex features an open plan kitchen and dining room 

A listing by estate agents Knight Frank reads: 'The Mansion at Sundridge Park is an exquisite country house fashioned in the form of a Renaissance temple and set within a sweeping landscape of sculptured gardens and woodland walks'. There is also a large dressing room and an en-suite with free standing bath and a large walk in shower

A listing by estate agents Knight Frank reads: ‘The Mansion at Sundridge Park is an exquisite country house fashioned in the form of a Renaissance temple and set within a sweeping landscape of sculptured gardens and woodland walks’. There is also a large dressing room and an en-suite with free standing bath and a large walk in shower

Pictured is the elegant-looking living room in the two-bedroom apartment in the mansion building

Pictured is the elegant-looking living room in the two-bedroom apartment in the mansion building 

All of the apartments have either two or three bedrooms and one of the £900,000 ones features a circular balcony with panoramic views across the golf course.

The kitchens in the apartments are fitting with integrated Siemens appliances and  

Kitchen is appointed with integrated Siemens appliances, stone worktops and bathrooms with fittings from Villeroy & Boch and Crosswater.

The more expensive apartments feature their own private terraces and have private entrances at the side of the mansion.  

The apartment also features an open-plan kitchen with views of a courtyard, a cloakroom, and private terraces.

There is also a large dressing room and an en-suite with free standing bath and a large walk in shower.

Pictures show the incredible original wine cellar and there is also a pantry and double garage.

It lies close to Sundridge Park Golf Club, which boasts championship courses.

The apartment also features an open-plan kitchen with views of a courtyard, a cloakroom, and private terraces

The apartment also features an open-plan kitchen with views of a courtyard, a cloakroom, and private terraces

Pictured is the large master bedroom in the flat which has enough space for a sofa and two armchairs positioned around a glass coffee table

Pictured is the large master bedroom in the flat which has enough space for a sofa and two armchairs positioned around a glass coffee table

The listing goes on: ‘The Mansion is the ultimate address for keen golfers looking to be just minutes from the clubhouse and also provides a peaceful surrounding oasis of almost 300 acres with spectacular views.’

The US White House lies on Capitol Hill in Washington DC and has been used by every president since John Adams in 1800.

The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban in a neoclassical style and was modelled on Leinster House in Dublin. 

From 1792-2021: How the White House has changed over the years

The White House was designed by Irish architect James Hoban in a neoclassical style. It was modelled on Leinster House in Dublin which is the location of the Oireachtas (Irish legislature). 

It is classed as a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President’s Park. 

Work began on Hoban’s design in 1792 and wasn’t completed until 1800. When Thomas Jefferson moved in the next year he added low colonnades one each wing of the mansion. 

During the War of 1812 the mansion was set on fire by the British Army and the interior was destroyed. Reconstruction took a few years and James Monroe was able to move into the home in 1817. 

A semi-circular south portico was added in 1824 and a north portico was added in 1829. By 1901 Theodore Roosevelt moved all work offices to the West Wing and it was eight years later that William Howard Taft expanded it and created the Oval Office. 

In 1948 the building’s load-bearing walls were found to be close to collapse. Harry S Truman ordered the interior rooms to be dismantled and rebuilt with an internal load-bearing steel frame. 

He also added the Truman Balcony.    

Today’s White House complex includes the six-storey Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building and Blair House, a guest residence.  

The Mansion at Sundridge Park: A refurbished Grade I home visited by Edward VII

The Mansion at Sundridge Park stands on grounds that were laid out by the 19-century landscape designer Humpthry Repton. 

The house itself is a fully refurbished version of the Grade I-listed John Nash mansion where Edward VII attended shooting parties. 

Wealthy London families have lived in the house since the 17th century. 

Sir Claude Scott purchased that house in 1795 and demolished it on the advice of Humphry Repton, building the present mansion on an opposite slope and creating the park. The stuccoed stately home was designed by John Nash and the work was completed under the direction of Samuel Wyatt.

The park became a golf course, with a new clubhouse opened by prime minister Arthur James Balfour in 1903.

Sundridge Park mansion functioned as a luxury hotel until after World War II and became a management centre in 1956. A new block of residential accommodation was completed in 1970.

The grand staircase, plasterwork and 18th-century paintings have now been restored. The homes are reached via the estate’s lodge entrance and a half-mile drive beside the fairways.

Source: House and Heritage 

 

 

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Dubs get exercised over digital dollars

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Dubliners are to be “paid” for a walk in the park with “civic dollars” they can cash in for coffee and cake and other goods and services, in an effort to encourage outdoor exercise.

Visitors to five parks in the Dublin 8 area can earn the community currency if they sign up for a new smart phone app to allow Dublin City Council to track their park use.

The scheme is being piloted in the area from the Liberties to Inchicore, following research by the council’s Smart D8 team which found just 40 per cent of local residents took regular exercise, but 92 per cent said they would use a park for exercise if it was available to them.

Visitors to St Audoen’s Park, St Patrick’s Park, Weaver Park and Oscar Square in the Liberties, and Grattan Park in Inchicore who use the app will be rewarded with civic dollars for every 30 minutes they spend in the park up to a limit of 5 dollars a day.

Data anonymised

The system uses GPS data and allows users to opt in once they enter a park. Their data is anonymised, and a user’s session will end automatically once they walk out of the park. Data gathered will be used by the council to analyse park usage and allow for future planning and infrastructure improvements.

The dollars can be cashed in for discounts in a number of local businesses including Little Bird cafe, the Bike Hub, Mobility Genie, the Digital Hub and Epic Ireland. The dollars can also be donated to community organisations for more expensive services including marketing or IT advice and legal consultations, with participating companies including Core Tech IT, Paul Saxon Consulting, Éire Graphic Design and VAVA Influencers.

The Smart D8 project was established earlier this year to investigate innovative approaches to improve citizens’ health and wellbeing in Dublin 8, with the involvement of St James’s Hospital and the Digital Hub.

The civic dollars pilot will run for five months, with the aim of attracting 1,000 users in the first two months, and could be rolled out to other parks in the city if successful.

Organisations accepting dollar donations include Warrenmount Community Education Centre, Robert Emmet Community Development Project, Solas Project and Fatima Groups United.

The scheme had the potential to “improve the health and wellbeing of our citizens”, Lord Mayor of Dublin Alison Gilliland said.

“We need to encourage increased use of our parks, and the civic dollars project will do that while having the added benefit of contributing to local businesses and community organisations.”


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‘I felt safe, everyone had a mask and the kids had a ball’

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There was only excitement and joy outside the Gaiety theatre in Dublin on Sunday afternoon, as children waited to watch the first showing of its annual pantomime.

The show, The Little Mermaid, began its six-week run in the 150-year-old venue much to the delight of ticket holders who were nervous about whether the show would go ahead.

The National Public Health Emergency Team (Nphet) last week recommended to Government that children under 12 should avoid “indoor seasonal events” for the next two weeks due to a high level of Covid-19 in that age group.

However, Tánaiste Leo Varadkar said it was up to parents as to whether children could attend these events over the weekend, as the Government would make a formal decision on Tuesday.

While the Government considers the recommendations, those in attendance at the Gaiety panto on Sunday felt safe and excited that they could witness the festive showpiece.

Jennifer Rattigan and her three daughters – Evie (4), Jayda (5) and Callie Mae (7) – had tickets to the show for November 30th, but following the recent recommendations they bought a second set of tickets for Sunday in case the later date was cancelled.

“We decided to get tickets today in case we couldn’t go on the original date. It’s not fair on the kids, they’re after missing out on so much already with school, lessons and dancing,” she said.

“At the start of the lockdown, all of the emphasis was on the kids, people were moving out of your way, it was like they have the plague. I do think the kids are being punished unnecessarily.”

Ms Rattigan asked if children could go to school, matches could continue outdoors and adults could attend nightclubs, “then why can’t children go to a little show when all the precautions have been taken?”

Susanna O’Toole was in attendance with her sisters, nieces, nephews and daughters.

“The show was brilliant. It was lovely, the kids had a ball. I felt safe, everyone had their mask on and it was totally safe,” she said after seeing the production.

“We were glad we got to see it because we were planning on booking the Olympia panto on Stephen’s Day and then when we heard that thing about the under-12s, we said there’s no point in booking it now. You only go for the kids.”

Priscila Centenaro was attending with her seven-year-old daughter Haily, who had never attended a show before.

“This is a classic of Disney. That’s why I brought my little one, so she knows the story. I read to her so this time she can actually see it,” Ms Centenaro said.

Asked if recent advice about children being indoors made her nervous, Ms Centenaro said “not at all”.

“In winter normally everybody gets a cold. It’s just happy days and enjoyment.”

Friends, from left, Mia Sokolwski, Haily Gdowska and Julia Sokolwski from Portlaoise before the start of The Little Mermaid pantomime. Photograph: Tom Honan
Friends, from left, Mia Sokolwski, Haily Gdowska and Julia Sokolwski from Portlaoise before the start of The Little Mermaid pantomime. Photograph: Tom Honan

Peter Sokolwski who attended with his eight-year-old twin daughters said they were there for fun after a very challenging year and a half.

He said he was “absolutely not” nervous about being indoors with his children, despite recent advice from health officials and high daily case numbers.

“I have my vaccination so everything is alright,” he said.

“They’re kids. They’re supposed to be outside. They’re supposed to be playing. They’re supposed to have fun.”

Lynsey Feeney, from Dublin 2, attended with her two daughters, Penny (7) and Priya (5), and their cousins.

Sisters Penny and Priya Feeney before the start of the Gaiety pantomine. Photograph: Tom Honan
Sisters Penny and Priya Feeney before the start of the Gaiety pantomine. Photograph: Tom Honan

“It’s Christmas, we just said we would do something with them before they are locked back up,” she said.

Ms Feeney said she was fully vaccinated and felt she couldn’t keep telling her children they couldn’t do things.

“It is hard when you’re stuck. I live in an apartment and I’ve another baby at home, so the minute it goes dark we don’t move. And now we can’t go anywhere seeing Santa or anything like that,” she added.

Minister for Culture Catherine Martin has announced that extra money will be found if necessary to support those staging pantomimes and other Christmas theatre events that might be affected by the Covid pandemic.

The new scheme, which has €2 million in funding, will open on Monday for venues and producers putting on pantomimes and other Christmas events.

Under this scheme commercial operators will be able to apply for up to 50 per cent of their costs back if the pandemic interrupts the production.

Asked if there has been any clarity on rules around pantomimes over the weekend, a Government spokeswoman said the Nphet advice had been communicated to the Minister and Government in the usual manner.

“Government will consider any recommendations arising at the next Cabinet meeting,” she added.

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Irish house prices are undervalued? Shows just how misleading stats can be

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Ever hear the one about the statistician who drowned in a lake, average depth 12 inches? Averages can be elucidating; they can also be infuriating.

Central Statistics Office (CSO) data suggests house prices rose by 2.3 per cent between 2005 and 2020, while average incomes, over the same period, rose by 32 per cent. The yo-yoing effect of the crash and the acceleration in property values post-2013 lie hidden beneath the surface of these numbers.

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