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Spotlight on lampshades: Bolder is better when selecting lighting

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Affordable and chic, lampshades are a great way to add instant style to your home.

Whether you introduce a dramatic pendant shade, a moody wall light or a cosy table lamp.

Gone are the days when muted hues and standard drum shades ruled the roost — now vibrant patterns, unexpected materials and sculptural shapes provide the perfect pep-up.

Switched on: Jenny Velvet shades, £25 each, John Lewis. Lampshades are a great way to add instant style to your home

Switched on: Jenny Velvet shades, £25 each, John Lewis. Lampshades are a great way to add instant style to your home

Paired perfection

Swapping table lampshades is a great way to contemporise a tired base. To make the right pairing, a good rule of thumb is that the height of the shade should be about three-quarters the height of the base.

Opting for a shade half an inch wider than the base on both sides will help keep the whole piece looking balanced. 

A recent upswing in the popularity of statement shades means there’s more choice than ever.

Oversized rattan and raffia pendant lamps are trending, welcomed for their relaxed, naturalistic look. Check out Made’s Haroon Layered Lampshade, £79 (made.com) with its contrasting trim for a simple, yet tailored, finish. In the same series, its Haroon Wall Light, £35, combines raffia with a rose-pink velvet trim.

‘Introducing a raw, organic element into your interiors is so on-trend this season,’ says Arteriors’ Laura Hadad.

‘Woven shades have timeless appeal and add texture. We’re also using materials such as shells and wrapped brass to change up the look.’

Go Bright 

Whether for wall, ceiling or table lights, colour and pattern is making a comeback this year.

‘We are craving pattern-on-pattern and bright, positive hues,’ says designer Rosi de Ruig, whose lampshades are all handmade using materials sourced mainly from Britain.

The Pink & Red Viennese Curl marbled shade, £75, works well as a wall lamp or on bookshelves.

Rosi de Ruig's Joy of Print mint green shade, £80

Rosi de Ruig’s Joy of Print mint green shade, £80

The key is to have fun. ‘People tend to take more risks with them than they do with paint, wallpaper or a sofa,’ says Pooky’s Rohan Blacker. 

‘Think about whether you want the light to diffuse through the fabric or to pool down underneath the shade.

‘If the latter, go for a shade in thick card or a metallic. Otherwise choose lighter fabrics.’

We love the Grey And Pink Palm tapered shade, £33, by Matthew Williamson for Pooky, with its feel-good fronds.

‘Shades in velvet and cotton, and those that are lined, will let less light through, giving more of a cosy and romantic ambience,’ says Emma Deterding of Kelling Designs. ‘Conversely, linens and silks have a brighter, airy feel.’

Jewel tones, such as the Jenny Velvet shade, from £25, at John Lewis & Partners, are big news, while there’s also a revival of pleated paper lampshades.

‘In all forms, from floor lamps to desk lights, they are a nice alternative to a plain shade and are softer than glass,’ says Topology’s Athina Bluff. 

Try Anthropologie’s Harriet Pleated Floor Lamp, £228, for a pleasing blend of softness and silhouette.

Get crafty

Trims, tassels and hand-painted additions will take lampshades to new heights.

‘More is more,’ says Jules Haines, whose designs use leftover textiles and offcuts to reduce waste in the interiors industry. 

‘We are seeing frills, bows and pleats popular in the Eighties reappearing in our homes. It’s so easy to make a lampshade more interesting by adding a tassel or trim.’

Perfect your craft skills at her beginner’s lampshade making workshops, £65, this summer in a converted barn in Kent.

‘I’m all about the table lamp; add one to your kitchen sideboard or your home office desk, it creates a more relaxed, casual atmosphere.’

If you need wall lights, but want to avoid the mess of wiring them in, think outside the box. 

‘Many now come with cords and plugs,’ says interior designer Kim Stephen.

‘Running the wire down to the nearest socket can look quite charming, especially if you change the flex to something decorative.’

What your home really needs is… a hammock 

Just the sound of the word ‘hammock’ may make you feel like taking a nap.

But, if you can stay awake, you may be interested to learn that this type of bed, a summer 2021 must-have, came to Europe after the 16th-century Spanish conquest of Central America.

The region’s peoples wove the bark of the hamak tree into lengths of material which they hung in their homes. Subsequently sailors became the biggest fans of hammocks until the Fifties.

Stretch out: The colourful Ibiza-style Aruba Juniper (pictured, £63.10) from Simply Hammocks

Stretch out: The colourful Ibiza-style Aruba Juniper (pictured, £63.10) from Simply Hammocks

Your home needs a hammock because on a fine afternoon you can sway gently while sipping a cool drink.

If you prefer the traditional approach, you can sling your hammock, such as the colourful Ibiza-style Aruba Juniper (£63.10) from Simply Hammocks, between two trees, using rope fixings with carabiner hooks at £37.10 each.

But a hammock suspended from a frame is less hassle. Options include the Charles Bentley Wooden Arc Hammock, a cream cotton canvas model which is more long Edwardian summer’s day than Balearic cool (£279.99). 

Whichever hammock you choose, you are guaranteed to chill out. 

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Minister has ‘no idea’ how many funds will escape 10% stamp duty, says Doherty

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Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe has been accused of having “no idea” how many forward purchase agreements were in place to bulk buy houses before they were exempted from an increase in stamp duty on multiple purchases.

Sinn Féin finance spokesman Pearse Doherty made the accusation after Mr Donohoe said such information “is not collected by the department. However I will explore with the Minister for Housing whether it is possible to put in place a reporting regime for agreements of this nature”.

Mr Doherty criticised the Minister for not attempting to establish how many housing units and developments would be bought by vulture funds without being subject to the 10 per cent stamp duty obligation.

“This is about Maynooth all over again and you’ve no idea how many of them are there,” he said in reference to the purchase by an investment fund of an entire housing estate in Co Kildare, which sparked controversy around the squeezing out of first-time buyers.

The subsequent public anger prompted the Government to impose a 10 per cent stamp duty, instead of the normal 1 per cent, for bulk purchases of 10 or more houses in a 12-month period by an individual or corporation.

Mr Doherty told the Minister: “You have no idea how many forward purchase agreements are in place yet you exempted every single last one of them from the 10 per cent stamp duty.”

He added that the Minister had no idea either how many transactions had been completed since the financial resolution was introduced last month.

“And really doesn’t that speak volumes of the fact that you were kicked dragging to this point where you didn’t want to be in the first place which was you didn’t want to tax the vulture funds.”

Raising the issue during finance questions in the Dáil he said “you have exempted something that you don’t know how much is there. You don’t know how many bulk purchases over the next number of years because you have no knowledge of how many agreements are there.”

But defending his approach Mr Donohoe said he was motivated to have policies to deal with the bulk purchase on family houses but also to “get the balance right between also allowing more homes being built in the future”.

He said he had information about the kinds of purchases and forward purchases that took place in recent years but the information “isn’t available to me” in relation to purchases currently being completed or under way.

But he insisted “that doesn’t undermine the policy rationale for what I did”.

Mr Doherty said the Minister could have got some information from published reports online but “you didn’t even look, you didn’t even want to find out. You came before this House and you said every single forward purchase agreement for homes is exempt that is already entered into a contract.

“And actually every single one that you actually complete over the next number of months we’ll exempt all of them as well.”

The Minister insisted however that he put the policy in place to get the balance right between trying to address multiple purchases but also allow supply of more homes in the future.

He added that if they extended the increased stamp duty to forward purchases “the net effect would be less homes being built in the future.

“I want to see more homes available and that’s why I believe the policy we have in place gets the balance right.”

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The Cotswold house being sold with a 94-year-old tortoise

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This pretty period property in the Cotswolds has an unusual feature that is being included in its sale. 

While new homes may occasionally try to tempt buyers by including additional items for sale, such as furniture or even a car, this Grade II listed property is on the market for £825,000 with a more unusual – and elderly – offering.

It has a 94-year-old resident tortoise that resides in the garden of the four-bedroom detached house in Wiltshire’s Box.

A 94-year-old tortoise is part of the sale of this stunning four-bedroom home in the Cotswolds

A 94-year-old tortoise is part of the sale of this stunning four-bedroom home in the Cotswolds

Resident Hercules is a local village celebrity and is an impressive 94 years old

Resident Hercules is a local village celebrity and is an impressive 94 years old

The property is called the The Old Diary and is bursting with character features. But its most charming feature is arguably Hercules, the tortoise.

After moving into The Old Dairy in 2007 and becoming custodian of the then 80-year-old resident tortoise, the current owner of the property soon discovered that Hercules is folklore in the village of Box and somewhat a creature of habit.

The current owner – of both the property and the tortoise – has lived in the property for the last 14 years and reports that Hercules can be expected to begin hibernating around 20 October, until emerging again on or very close to 20 April the following year in line with the start of warmer days. 

This is a feat they have seen repeated annually with complete accuracy.

When not hibernating, Hercules is a low-maintenance garden resident who enjoys a diet of lettuce, cucumber, and tomatoes.

While it’s no secret that Hercules is a local village celebrity, a less well-known fact about this four-legged garden friend is that following a visit to the vet in the 1970s, it was confirmed that Hercules is in fact female.

Beyond the walled-garden where Hercules resides, there is plenty more outdoor space to be enjoyed.

The property is full of character features including wooden beams and an Aga in the kitchen

The property is full of character features including wooden beams and an Aga in the kitchen

The property is for sale via estate agents Hunter French, in Corsham, with a price tag of £825,000

The property is for sale via estate agents Hunter French, in Corsham, with a price tag of £825,000

The inside of the period home spans three floors and includes this living room with a cosy fireplace

The inside of the period home spans three floors and includes this living room with a cosy fireplace

The ground floor of the property also includes this large and bright conservatory that leads to the garden

The ground floor of the property also includes this large and bright conservatory that leads to the garden

To the front of the house, there is a gravel driveway and lawned garden bordered by flowers. 

Also in the garden is an outbuilding that was once use as a double garage, but now offers itself as a space with potential for new owners to explore as it was previously transformed into a charming café.

Inside, the period home spans three floors. To the ground floor, there is a kitchen and breakfast room that can be accessed via the tiled entrance hall and boasts a blue Aga.

The formal dining room has access to the cellar and provides the perfect setting for entertaining, while the sitting room is centred around a cosy open fireplace.

Currently a working-from-home space, the third reception room is the oldest part of the property and completes the ground floor, alongside a utility room, cloakroom, and a conservatory.

As well as the family bathroom, there are three bedrooms on the first floor, while the fourth bedroom on the top floor has an ensuite and living space.

The outdoor space includes a driveway and an outbuilding that was once used as a double garage

The outdoor space includes a driveway and an outbuilding that was once used as a double garage

The character property in Box has four bedrooms including a main suite on the top floor

The character property in Box has four bedrooms including a main suite on the top floor 

The top floor includes additional living space that can be used to accommodate extra guests

The top floor includes additional living space that can be used to accommodate extra guests

Helen Whiteley, of property website OnTheMarket.com, said: ‘It certainly isn’t every day you come across a property for sale with its very own resident tortoise.

‘At the age of 94, Hercules has so far lived through two World Wars as well as the reign of four British monarchs, George V, Edward VIII, George VI, and Elizabeth II.

‘If she could, I’m sure she would be able to tell some of the most amazing tales. As it stands, now both the property and Hercules are seeking their next owner to act as their custodian with each full of character, albeit in rather different ways.’

The current owner - of both the property and the tortoise - has lived in the property for the last 14 years

The current owner – of both the property and the tortoise – has lived in the property for the last 14 years

There is plenty of outdoor space that Hercules uses, including a lawn and flower beds

There is plenty of outdoor space that Hercules uses, including a lawn and flower beds

The outbuilding offers the potential for new owners to explore as it was once a charming café

The outbuilding offers the potential for new owners to explore as it was once a charming café

Lauren Walsh, of estate agents Hunter French, in Corsham, – which is handling the sale – said: ‘The Old Dairy is an incredibly charming home filled with character and would make for a wonderful family home looking to make their next move.

‘While Hercules the tortoise is undeniably one of the most popular characters in the local village, Box itself has a lovely sense of community and offers great places to spend days out with family and friends, whether this be in the great outdoors or at one of the welcoming pubs or restaurants on offer.’

The outbuilding could be used as guest accommodation or as a bed & breakfast option

The outbuilding could be used as guest accommodation or as a bed & breakfast option

The inside of the outbuilding could be transformed to help produce an additional income

The inside of the outbuilding could be transformed to help produce an additional income

The village of Box is on the southern slope of the ByBrook valley and in the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty,

Many of its buildings are made from the natural Box stone which has been quarried in the surrounding area since at least the 8th Century.

The average price of a property in Box is almost double the £329,735 national average at £601,284, according to property website Zoopla.

Peter Gabriel established his state of the art ‘Real World Studios’ in Box and this has helped to attract people from the entertainment industry to settle in the village.

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Ireland’s data commissioner loses sole regulatory oversight of Facebook in Europe

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Europe’s top court on Tuesday endorsed the power of national data watchdogs to pursue big tech firms even if they are not their lead regulators, in a setback for Silicon Valley companies such as

Facebook. The EU Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling could encourage national agencies to act against US tech companies such as Google, Twitter and Apple, which all have their European Union headquarters in Ireland.

Many national watchdogs in the 27-member European Union have long complained about their Irish counterpart, saying that it takes too long to decide on cases.

Ireland has dismissed this, saying it has to be extra meticulous in dealing with powerful and well-funded tech giants. The ECJ got involved after a Belgian court sought guidance on

Facebook’s challenge against the territorial competence of the Belgian data watchdog’s bid to stop it from tracking users in Belgium through cookies stored in the company’s social plug-ins, regardless of whether they have an account or not.

“Under certain conditions, a national supervisory authority may exercise its power to bring any alleged infringement of the GDPR before a court of a member state, even though that authority is not the lead supervisory authority with regard to that processing,” the ECJ said.

Under landmark EU privacy rules known as GDPR, Facebook faces oversight by the Irish privacy authority because it has its European head office in Ireland. – Reuters

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