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Opera Megastar Hvorostovsky – Great Exclusive Video

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This remarkable talent from the depths of Siberia wowed the world for decades. He was one of the truly huge international megastars, and his fans around the world are devastated.

This is a Russian TV News obituary on Hvorostovsky, showing interviews of him in his youth, him singing at various stages during his career, reactions of friends, scenes from his family life, and in his last days when he was clearly ill.

A touching and moving report on a national hero.

Captions exclusively on Russia Insider.

Full transcript follows below.

Transcript: 

Anchor:

Words of deep sorrow are flooding in from all over the world today over the death of a Russian opera singer. Vladimir Putin expressed his condolences to Dmitri Hvorostovsky’s family.

Putin, like millions of other people in the world, was a fan of his talent. A memorial service will be held in Moscow, on Nov. 27 in the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall.

Hvorostovsky:

Turn around, a stranger passing by… Yes, I’m like that. And the most important thing is to believe in yourself, believe in love. To believe in happiness!

Correspondent: 

Krasnoyarsk, June. One of Hvorostovsky’s last interviews, where he thanks his landsmen for not returning their tickets and waiting for him. This is my home. I was born and grew up here. I went to school here. And regularly, from the very start of my career I’ve reported to you, to Krasnoyarsk.

Here he found his endless love for music. His father was an engineer, his mother a doctor, but opera was always the favorite at home, especially Verdi. Here, at the Krasnoyarsk Opera and Ballet Theater, he received his first ovation, international acclaim came later. Since 1989, this amazing, vivid baritone began sounding from all opera stages. A masterpiece requiring matchless strength. A triumph on stage, and such an ethereal, signature humbleness with people.

Interviewer:

You never marvel at your talent?

Hvorostovsky:

What? You mean?.. No, never!

Interviewer:

No?

Hvorostovsky:

What talent? First of all, when I… When I hear my recordings, or when I watch them, I see the mistakes very well.

Correspondent:

1993, a rehearsal in Moscow. He’s already well-known across the globe.

Hvorostovsky:

For me, it’s that much more pleasant, interesting, and honorable to have my new programs, usually, Russian programs, to be seen by my compatriot audience.

Hvorostovsky singing:

Dark in the night. Just the bullet’s whistling all over the steppe…

Correspondent:

Hvorostovsky sang Soviet war songs on all continents, as brilliantly as the operas of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Verdi, Mozart, and Bizet. And in his intensely busy schedule, there’s always the underlined “Red Square Concert, open-air.”

Hvorostovsky singing:

So difficult to say, and not to say…

Correspondent:

The tenderness of a Russian opera toreador: tall, long-haired, athletic, nobly grey-haired, lives in London.

Truth be told, he’s married. Her name is Florence, and two children: Maxim and Nina. These are home videos from the recent years. A Siberian, Dmitri Hvorostovsky.

Igor Krutoy, People’s Artist of Russia:

“We were recording, and he says he’s getting sleepy. And then he says, “Come on,” then put me on his shoulders and did 20 sit-ups. With all my weight, the way I am. He was this physically fit.”

Constantine Orbelyan, pianist, friend:

“He never complained, and never wanted to talk about his sickness. He didn’t want to be pitied by anyone. He couldn’t stand it. He only wanted to look to the future.” When he learned about his diagnosis, Hvorostovsky stays on stage. He gives charity concerts for sick kids, he tours with his opera star friends. He even titles the performances, “Hvorostovsky and Friends.”

Vladimir Fedoseyev, People’s Artist of USSR:

“He opened his soul. A Siberian, a Russian, a singer that dreamt to sing always, for a long time to come.”

Correspondent:

At the Vienna Opera House, the flags are half-mast today. And from Canada, the singer Lara Fabian once again declares her love to Dmitri: “I love you, be safe, wherever you are now.” Thank you for your music, your soul, for everything you gave to this Universe.”

In his last interview,

Hvorostovsky said:

“I’m no longer a young talent, but an authority in the Opera world. I must be helpful.”

And he always helped musicians and singers, those very talents, in hopes that they will believe in happiness, love, and themselves.

Hvorostovsky singing:

Oh, how we believed in ourselves…

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Nadine Lott told ex-partner who later killed her not to ‘threaten’ her, court hears

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Nadine Lott told her former partner not to “threaten” her two weeks before he killed her, the Central Criminal Court has heard.

The jury in the trial of Daniel Murtagh was given transcripts on Tuesday of WhatsApp messages between the accused and his ex-girlfriend in the days and weeks leading up to her death.

In them, the accused asks her if she is “seeing someone from Dublin”. In reply, Ms Lott tells him she is not seeing anyone. Mr Murtagh asks her if there was a “Dublin lad” in her “place” and she tells him to “leave it out”.

She tells him that “nothing is ever going to happen between us again, I want to make that clear.”

In another text from December 5th the accused said: “Nadine I worry about ye, not in love, just don’t slip”.

She replied: “Don’t threaten me either”.

Evidence has previously been given that Mr Murtagh told a motorist that he had “killed my wife because she was with my friend”, just hours after he assaulted her.

John Begley testified last week that he saw a car in a ditch as he was travelling over Bookies Bridge in Laragh on the morning of December 14th and then came across the accused man standing at the side of the road.

“Daniel said to me ‘you don’t know what I’ve done”. I said what did you do. He said ‘I killed my wife’. I didn’t think anything of it. He said it a second time and said he hoped she was not dead. He said ‘she was with my friend’,” said Mr Begley.

Mr Murtagh (34), of Melrose Grove, Bawnogue, Clondalkin, Dublin 22 has pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to the manslaughter of his 30-year-old ex-partner Ms Lott at her apartment in St Mary’s Court, Arklow, Co Wicklow on December 17th, 2019.

The jury has heard that Ms Lott suffered “severe blunt force trauma” and stab injuries at the hands of her former partner “in a sustained and violent attack” in her Arklow home.

They have heard evidence that the injuries to Ms Lott were so serious that she never regained consciousness and died three days later in St Vincent’s Hospital in Dublin.

An intensive care nurse at the hospital has told the jury that Ms Lott was “completely unrecognisable” and that she had never seen anybody so badly injured. A paramedic who attended to Ms Lott at her home told the jury that the call will “haunt” him for the rest of his career and was one of the most “horrendous scenes” he had ever walked into. The garda who telephoned ambulance control informed them that Ms Lott had been “beaten to a pulp”.

The trial continues before Mr Justice Michael MacGrath and a jury of seven men and five women.

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Five unwritten rules that explain life in Austria

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Adjusting to life in a new country takes time – even more so when navigating unwritten rules of how to act in social and professional situations.

But learning how to live like a local in Austria will not only make it a more pleasant experience, it will also show that you fit in and respect the rules.

To help you further understand Austrian culture, here are five unwritten rules that explain life in Austria.

Always say hello – at least in the countryside

Austrians have a reputation for being direct in their communication, but politeness is also highly valued. 

A prime example is the unwritten rule of saying hello to people – even if you don’t know them.

This applies more in the countryside than in the cities but it’s worth being aware of to avoid making a social faux pas.

According to a Kurier article, failure to greet others will even have you labelled as unfriendly, arrogant or badly educated.

READ MORE: Nine things you might be surprised are actually Austrian

So, if someone is walking towards you, you walk into a bakery (for example) or you see neighbours on the street, then a greeting is expected.

It could be a simple nod of the head, but in most cases it will be “Servus”, “Griaß di” or even “Hallo”.

But don’t try it in a city like Vienna. Saying hello to strangers will just result in funny looks.

Saying hello to someone will show them that you come in peace. Photo by Tom Leishman from Pexels

Always bring food or drink to a social gathering

If invited to a barbecue or dinner party at someone’s house, always take a drink or something to contribute to the meal.

For example, if your host is cooking, offer to bring a salad or a dessert.

If they are taking care of the food then offer to bring a nice bottle of wine or a selection of beers.

If you’re going to a gathering, always bring something – especially if someone tells you it’s not necessary. Photo by Nicole Herrero on Unsplash

And if they are hosting a barbecue, always take your own meat and expect a wide selection of salads and bread that other guests will also bring and share with everyone else.

Not only is this polite, but it will stop other people from talking about you because you violated the unwritten rule.

Don’t expect polite queues at ski lift stations

While Austrian society can be polite in many ways, queueing at ski lift stations in the Alps is a different story.

In fact, it’s a free-for-all and it’s something that both tourists and international residents in Austria have experienced.

REVEALED: What do Austrians think about foreigners?

An Austrian in Tyrol, who asked to remain anonymous, summed it up when he told The Local: “Don’t be civilised and politely queue up at the ski lifts – just push in.”

So, when going skiing in Austria, leave your manners at home, be prepared for others to cut in front of you and get ready to push to the front of the queue.

For a country that loves order and predictability, Austria sure doesn’t know how to queue. Photo by Mael BALLAND on Unsplash

Lateness is not appreciated

People in Austria are generally punctual, like to be on time and expect others to do the same – just like in neighbouring countries Germany and Switzerland.

The unwritten rule applies to both work and social situations, including going out to dinner at a restaurant.

READER QUESTION: Is it legal to drink in public in Austria?

This means if you’re running late it’s polite to call the host and let them know. Likewise if you have a reservation at a restaurant.

However, there is still a limit on how much lateness can be tolerated, with 15 minutes typically the maximum delay before people become annoyed.

Always carry cash

Cash is king in Austria. 

What can I get for this many? Always carry cash in Austria. Photo by Christian Dubovan on Unsplash

It always has been and it probably always will be, with a pre-pandemic study showing that 83 per cent of Austrians preferred paying with cash.

Customers can even expect a grumpy roll of the eyes when trying to pay with cash in some places because it’s so deeply ingrained in the culture.

READ MORE: Why is cash so important to Austrians?

This attitude towards cash is perfectly reflected in the Austrian saying “Nur Bares ist Wahres” (only cash is true) and there are three reasons for this – freedom, anonymity and control. 

Austrians like to have the freedom of not relying on a bank, the anonymity to spend money on whatever they like and control over spending.

For international residents from card-favouring countries like the UK, Ireland and most of Scandinavia, the best way to deal with this is to just get used to carrying cash.



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Shocking news, Irish people may be sanest in Europe

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Ireland is running low on loopers. If we don’t watch out, we could emerge from the pandemic with our reputation for wildness completely shredded. We are in danger of being exposed as the sanest people in Europe.

Vaccines go into the arm, but also into the brain. They are a kind of probe sent into the national consciousness. In Ireland’s case, the probe has discovered exciting evidence of intelligent life.

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