Connect with us

Current

HSE hackers ‘most probably’ located in Moscow, says Russia’s top cybersecurity tycoon

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Hackers in Russia who target foreign firms and critical infrastructure such as Ireland’s health service will enjoy impunity until the West works more closely on the issue with Moscow, according to the head of Russia’s top cybersecurity firm.

Before speaking at a conference on cybercrime in Dublin on Thursday, Eugene Kaspersky also denied that his company has links to Russia’s powerful security services, despite it being blacklisted by the US and British governments over fears that its products could be exploited by intelligence agencies in Moscow.

Kaspersky said his experts were quick to assist Ireland via Interpol when the HSE was hit by a major ransomware attack in May, and within three days pinpointing “the internet provider that the bad guys were using in Moscow”.

“We don’t have their names. We’re not the police so we can’t go to the internet provider and ask who is behind these IP addresses,” Kaspersky told The Irish Times at the headquarters of Kaspersky Lab overlooking the Moscow canal.

The Moscow headquarters of cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, founded in 1997, which via Interpol helped Ireland respond to the HSE ransomware attack in May. Photograph: Daniel McLaughlin
The Moscow headquarters of cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, founded in 1997, which via Interpol helped Ireland respond to the HSE ransomware attack in May. Photograph: Daniel McLaughlin

“But we have everything for the Russian cyberpolice if they call us about the case. And we shared all this information with Interpol, of course.”

That call is unlikely to come, however, due to an almost complete breakdown of co-operation between Moscow and the West in the political and security fields, which Kaspersky says makes Russia a “paradise” for cybercriminals.

Shadowy deal

Yet he puts this down to a combination of legal issues and poor relations for which the West and the Kremlin are both to blame, rather than any shadowy deal by which Russia’s security services shield – and sometimes deploy – the country’s hackers as long as they only attack foreign targets.

“It’s not an agreement, it’s the law. It’s about all crime, not just cybercrime – if the crime is done abroad, then the Russian police don’t have any reason to start an investigation,” he said.

If the US asks Russia for help in such cases, Kaspersky said there is “no response”.

“And it’s the same the opposite way. If Russia asks the United States or the UK to do something with suspects, nothing happens. There are win-win situations and this is lose-lose,” he added.

“What I heard from law enforcement and people working with law enforcement is that this co-operation is completely broken, and it is not [only] Russia’s fault – it’s both sides’ fault. So in Russia, for cybercrime, it’s a paradise.”

US president
Joe Biden has repeatedly urged Russian counterpart
Vladimir Putin to tackle the issue, apparently without success

Kaspersky said the HSE hackers were “most probably” located in Moscow at the time of the attack, and described Russia as a “major source” of cybercrime, where hackers who attacked foreign targets were “safe, absolutely, at the moment.”

“But if Russia and the [United] States agree about more close co-operation, they will not be safe. It must be solved on the top,” he added, referring to the political leadership of both countries.

Many analysts believe the Kremlin views Russian cybercrime against foreign firms and governments as a useful card to hold in talks with the West.

US president Joe Biden has repeatedly urged Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin to tackle the issue, apparently without success, and at a summit in June he gave him a list of 16 infrastructure sectors that should be “off-limits” to hackers, including energy and water supply and the health, election and banking systems.

In 2017 the US banned government departments from using Kaspersky Lab software over fears it could enable Russian spying and threaten national security.

Warning

The UK’s national cybersecurity centre told government agencies the same year not to use anti-virus products from Kaspersky Lab and other Russian firms, in a warning issued by its then director Ciaran Martin, who is also expected to attend the Irish Reporting and Information Security Service conference at the Aviva Stadium.

The company, which has offices in more than 30 countries and declared revenue of $704 million (€622 million) for 2020, insists it is not subject to sweeping rules that oblige Russian communication firms to save data on users’ activity for six months, and it assures customers outside Russia that their data is stored in Switzerland.

Kaspersky denies that the firm he co-founded in 1997, a decade after graduating from a KGB technical university, has moved closer to the Russian security services in recent years, particularly after the brief kidnapping of his son in 2011.

“When you talk about pressure from [security officials], I think it’s mostly the same in the States, the UK and many other nations. In some less, and some like China are even more strict. But the government coming and asking [us] to do something wrong? I don’t believe in this scenario, because it would be seen,” he said.

So in front of your smart devices, just don’t do something that you don’t want to be seen tomorrow on
YouTube

Kaspersky (56) also brushes off strong claims from opposition politicians that electronic voting in September’s Russian parliamentary elections was massively rigged in Moscow to hand victory to ruling-party candidates, using a system that incorporated Kaspersky block-chain technology.

“A couple of our engineers were there. They didn’t see everything, but I know others with more information there and I trust them…I don’t have any indicator that something was wrong.”

Kaspersky expects state regulation of the internet to increase globally in the coming years, in response to fears over the security of critical infrastructure and the vast amounts of personal data now in digital storage.

‘Less freedom’

“I believe there will be more and more regulation and less and less freedom, not just in Russia and China but in the States and the rest of world…There will be much more data collected about you, even very private data, to make your life easier. Do you want to choose privacy or comfort?” said Kaspersky, who has anti-drone systems made by his firm standing by his desk and on the roof of the building.

“So in front of your smart devices, just don’t do something that you don’t want to be seen tomorrow on YouTube, ” he advised.

“Do I like it? Do you like this weather? It’s reality. I can’t change it.”

Source link

Current

House and 54 acres for sale near Amanda Owen’s Our Yorkshire Farm

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Fancy living near the Yorkshire Shepherdess? Nearby derelict cottage with 54 acres of land in North Yorkshire is up for grabs for £255k

  • Property is near Ravenseat, from Amanda Owen’s TV Show Our Yorkshire Farm
  • Carter’s Cottage is the name of the property listing and it includes 54 acres
  • The renovation project in North Yorkshire is on the market for £255k










Fancy living near the Yorkshire Shepherdess and having the Yorkshire Dales in your back garden?

Now is your opportunity, as a property with 54.5 acres of land is available to buy for £255,000 near Ravenseat Farm, home to shepherdess Amanda Owen, her husband of 21 years Clive, and their nine children.

The catch is that the house and adjoining barn are derelict and off-grid, with no mains services but with access to natural water on the site. 

The family and remote Ravenseat farm feature in the popular Channel 5 show Our Yorkshire Farm, as well as the best-selling book The Yorkshire Shepherdess

Amanda Owen is pictured with her family, consisting of her husband Clive, and their children Raven, Reuben, Miles, Edith, Violet, Sidney, Annas, Clementine, and Nancy

Amanda Owen is pictured with her family, consisting of her husband Clive, and their children Raven, Reuben, Miles, Edith, Violet, Sidney, Annas, Clementine, and Nancy

The nearby property for sale for £255k is called Carter's Cottage and has a similar feel to Ravenseat due to the beautiful North Yorkshire countryside

The nearby property for sale for £255k is called Carter’s Cottage and has a similar feel to Ravenseat due to the beautiful North Yorkshire countryside

There are no mains services to the former cottage or the land but there is a natural water supply at various points

There are no mains services to the former cottage or the land but there is a natural water supply at various points

The property for sale is called Carter’s Cottage and has a similar feel to Ravenseat as it is surrounded by plenty of beautiful North Yorkshire countryside.

However, it does not currently include a habitable home. Instead, there is a derelict stone cottage that would need to be converted before it can be occupied – or even rented out as a holiday home – as well as an adjoining stone barn. 

The property for sale is in Arkengarthdale, which is a dale on the east side of the Pennines in North Yorkshire.

There are no mains services to the former cottage or land, but there is a natural water supply at various points. The property is on the market for £255,000 via estate agents H&H Land & Estates.

Amanda runs Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive. She says hundreds of curious fans come to visit in hopes of catching a glimpse of her or her children

Amanda runs Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive. She says hundreds of curious fans come to visit in hopes of catching a glimpse of her or her children

There is a derelict stone cottage that would need to be converted before it can be occupied - or even rented out as a holiday home

There is a derelict stone cottage that would need to be converted before it can be occupied – or even rented out as a holiday home

The property for sale is in Arkengarthdale, which is a dale on the east side of the Pennines in North Yorkshire

The property for sale is in Arkengarthdale, which is a dale on the east side of the Pennines in North Yorkshire

While bookings are not currently being taken due to the pandemic, fans of the show have previously been able to visit and stay at Ravenseat Farm by renting out either a shepherd’s hut for £90 a night or a separate property on the family’s land for £175 a night.

It is possible to make the area nearby your regular holiday spot – or even your permanent base – as the property for sale is around 14 miles from Ravenseat Farm.  

The building needs a lot of work has plenty of scope to become a family house or holiday home, depending on budgets and planning permission

The building needs a lot of work has plenty of scope to become a family house or holiday home, depending on budgets and planning permission

Land has become increasingly sought-after amid the pandemic’s so-called ‘race for space’ among buyers.

Daniel Copley, of property website Zoopla, said: ‘If you’re tempted to make the move from the city to the beautiful Yorkshire countryside, this cottage and 54.5 acres of pasture land is brimming with potential and has a truly stunning location overlooking the Yorkshire Dales.’

The property for sale is on an elevated position on the east side of Arkengarthdale. 

Reeth is around four miles to the east, with the larger market town of Richmond about 14 miles to the east.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Current

‘After divorce, I’ve fallen in love. But something is holding me back’

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Question: I’m a divorced man, and I think I’ve fallen in love. This woman I care about so much brought me back to life after my divorce woes and I feel happy when we’re together. My life would certainly change if the relationship progressed and I feel the need to hit the brakes. Is it fear holding me back? Some advice would be great.

Answer: I think it is great that you are able to identify fear as the block to your relationship and it is worth looking at this. You have had a divorce, so your experience of relationship breakup is real and is clearly causing you to pause before heading into a committed relationship again. Some areas worth checking are your capacity for self-awareness, your relationship patterns and habits and your history of decision making.

Looking at self-awareness first – are you conscious of what motivates your actions and speech? In terms of self-awareness, there are many aspects of our ourselves which we are aware of, but we do need help with uncovering the full picture. For example, we can often see that someone we live or work with is stressed but they themselves would not know or acknowledge this and think that they are operating from a calm and collected place. It might be worth you checking with friends what they see in your new relationship and how they see you behaving. Do you seem happier to them, or is there wariness or caution in your approach to your partner? Your friends or family will be able to evaluate your wellness (or not) without the emotion or fear that you may have operating.

Ask for some honest opinions and remember if you ask for advice, take it on board as they may have more objectivity than you do. We all have relationship patterns and habits, so it is worth looking at yours to see if this is influencing your current impasse. These patterns typically start with our family of origin. For example, if there were difficulties (silences, anger, distances, or lack trust and love) in your parents’ relationship it is likely that you have a capacity to put up with or repeat such patterns in your own relationships.

Send your query anonymously to Trish Murphy

It helps to talk it over with someone you trust, so that you can hear the emotion that is going on in your voice and then act to disperse it

It sounds as though you are mistrusting of someone who has “brought you back to life” and it is worth looking at whether this caution is coming from your own past experience or from fear of getting into a relationship pattern similar to your parents’ one. It takes courage to challenge our patterns and the nature of habit is that it operates outside of conscious thinking, so we can respond without even knowing where we are coming from, eg we push someone away just as intimacy is growing. Behaviour such as this could derive from a generational fear of rejection, or a fear of closeness, or of being discovered as not what we seem to be. It is good to explore such habits as we can struggle to see them operating and they can operate as a huge block in our lives.

It is true that the “in-love” feeling can sometimes mask some of the adored person’s characteristics and this is why we always need the “head” as well as the “heart” when making decisions. What is your decision-making like normally? Do you have enough knowledge of this person to make a decision about joining your lives together? Have you spent enough time with them and their circle of friends to make an informed choice? Sometimes the feeling of intense connection at the beginning of a relationship can make us lose sight of the fact that we don’t know the other person very well and in these situations we would do well to slow it down and let our judgement work when the time is right. If you are happy that you have enough knowledge and information to make this decision, then you are probably right that it is fear that is stopping you moving forward.

A little fear is natural and can even help us, for example we drive under the speed limit oftentimes out of fear of getting a speeding ticket. However too much fear can be debilitating, and it can completely bock our intelligence. All relationships involve risk, in that we have to trust that someone else will value us and not reject us. Fear is such a powerful emotion it can cover other more rational and sane judgements and so we need to ensure that we are not just operating from that place.

It helps to talk it over with someone you trust, so that you can hear the emotion that is going on in your voice and then act to disperse it. However, it is worth knowing that fear and panic are closely aligned so we need to tackle them slowly and incrementally or else we go into a kind of frozenness. Overcome small fears first – this might involve speaking with some honesty with your partner – and gradually build up to the bigger fears. Your confidence and self-awareness will grow along the way and this can only benefit you. 

Click here to send your question to Trish or email tellmeaboutit@irishtimes.com

Source link

Continue Reading

Current

Lighthouse workers end up with front-row seats for Storm Barra

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Four lighthouse workers who went to Fastnet Lighthouse in west Cork to carry out maintenance on Friday ended up having front-row seats for Storm Barra as they had to stay onsite due to the conditions.

The lighthouse recorded a wind gust of 159km/h on Tuesday morning but Irish Lights electronic engineer Paul Barron said that it was a safe place to be as the country battened down the hatches to face the storm.

Mr Barron and his colleagues Ronnie O’Driscoll, Dave Purdy and Malcolm Gillies made the journey to Fastnet on Friday to do maintenance work and were due back on Tuesday but their helicopter flight was cancelled because of the storm. They hope to arrive back on the mainland on Thursday.

Mr Barron said they are passing their time onsite by watching Netflix and having a few steaks and rashers. He admitted it was a day to remember on the lighthouse which is 54 metres above the sea.

“There is a team of four of us out here. It has been quite a rough day. We started off this morning at around 2am and by 10am or 11am we were in the eye of the storm. I was in the merchant Navy before as a radio officer so I have seen a lot of bad weather. I am with Irish Lights 32 years but I haven’t normally seen it like this. We wouldn’t normally be out in this. You are talking 9m swells with winds gusting up to 90 knots.”

He captured some footage of the storm on his phone. During the worst of the weather the men found it hard to hear each other as it was so noisy during the squalls.

The tower was “shuddering a bit” but Mr Barron managed to shoot video footage which attracted attention online and even a call from Sky News.

He says the lighthouse has kitchen facilities and they always bring additional food in case of emergency.

“It could be a fine summer’s day and there could be thick fog and the chopper wouldn’t take off so we always bring extra food. We are passing the time by watching Netflix! This is a good place to be in the eye of a storm. This lighthouse has been built a hundred years so it has seen a lot of storms.”

As for families being concerned about the men Mr Barron jokes that their loved ones are probably relieved they aren’t at home hogging the remote control.

Meanwhile, in Cork city centre the river Lee spilled on to quays and roads on Tuesday morning but no major damage to property was caused. Debris and falling trees kept local authority crews busy and power outages were reported in a number of areas across the county.

At least 23 properties were flooded in Bantry in west Cork. The council had placed sandbags along the quay wall and the fire brigade had six manned pumps around the town.

In north Cork, a lorry driver had a lucky escape in Fermoy when his vehicle overturned on the motorway during the high winds. Traffic diversions were put in place following the incident.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!