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Belgravia home of Prime Minister Stanley goes on the market for £23million

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A stunning Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. 

The sprawling residence at 93 Eaton Square consists of a main four-bedroom home and an interconnecting mews house with two further bedrooms. 

In addition the property boasts grand reception rooms, spacious patio gardens and eight bathrooms. 

While it is a charming example of a traditional period property, developers estimate it could be worth up to £30million if the next owner was willing to invest in modernising, extending and integrating the two homes to create a single super-prime property complete with mega basement. 

Period features: A Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. Pictured, the dining room where politicians and royalty have been entertained

Period features: A Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. Pictured, the dining room where politicians and royalty have been entertained

Grand: The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace

Grand: The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace

At-home spa: The main bedroom suite boasts this spacious bathroom with a luxurious sunken tub and mirror surround. The suite also boasts a study, walk-in dressing room/wardrobe and direct access to the private patio garden

At-home spa: The main bedroom suite boasts this spacious bathroom with a luxurious sunken tub and mirror surround. The suite also boasts a study, walk-in dressing room/wardrobe and direct access to the private patio garden 

Equipped for entertaining: The dining room in the main four-bedroom property is served by this large family kitchen complete with an island and a separate pantry and utility room (seen through the door on the right)

Equipped for entertaining: The dining room in the main four-bedroom property is served by this large family kitchen complete with an island and a separate pantry and utility room (seen through the door on the right)

Steeped in history: Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches

Steeped in history: Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin, then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children

In 1990, the property was briefly home to Margaret Thatcher (right) and her husband Dennis after she left office

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin (left), then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children. In 1990, the property was briefly home to Margaret Thatcher (right) and her husband Dennis after she left office

Quiet oasis: The property has access to the lush green gardens at the heart of the square (pictured) which offer an escape from the bustle of the city. There is also a separate patio garden off the back of the main residence

Quiet oasis: The property has access to the lush green gardens at the heart of the square (pictured) which offer an escape from the bustle of the city. There is also a separate patio garden off the back of the main residence 

Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches.

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin, then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children.

It was in the dining room and adjoining living spaces that Baldwin entertained his cousin and close friend Rudyard Kipling, as well as high profile figures including Winston Churchill, Neville Chamberlain (who lived at No. 37) and the Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII. 

Baldwin became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1922 and Prime Minister in 1923, a post he would hold three times (1923-34, 1924-1929 and 1935-1937). 

In the 1980s, the residence became home to Hendry Ford II, grandson of Ford Motor Company Henry Ford, and his wife, Kathleen DuRoss ford. 

The wealthy Americans bought the property as a city pied-a-terre, in addition to their British country house, Turville Grange, an 18th century manor house near Henley-on-Thames that Henry II had owned since the 1970s. 

Ultimate luxury: The master bedroom, pictured, is traditionally decorated but could be renovated and transformed with a more modern treatment. The large room has space for a king-sized bed and opens directly out onto the patio garden

Ultimate luxury: The master bedroom, pictured, is traditionally decorated but could be renovated and transformed with a more modern treatment. The large room has space for a king-sized bed and opens directly out onto the patio garden

Cosy corner: The study, pictured, is part of the master bedroom suite of rooms and also opens out onto the garden patio. At the moment it is used as a private living room but there would be plenty of space to install a desk to work from home

Cosy corner: The study, pictured, is part of the master bedroom suite of rooms and also opens out onto the garden patio. At the moment it is used as a private living room but there would be plenty of space to install a desk to work from home

Extra accommodation: Attached to the primary residence is a second mews house with two bedrooms. This could be used to house staff, elderly family members or visitors. Above, one of the two bedrooms on offer in the mews house

Extra accommodation: Attached to the primary residence is a second mews house with two bedrooms. This could be used to house staff, elderly family members or visitors. Above, one of the two bedrooms on offer in the mews house

Tucked away: One of the highlights of the property is this large, split-level patio garden which would be ideal for summer parties. It has direct access to the master bedroom and largest guest bedroom in the main house

Tucked away: One of the highlights of the property is this large, split-level patio garden which would be ideal for summer parties. It has direct access to the master bedroom and largest guest bedroom in the main house

Kathleen DuRoss Ford, a former model, accomplished photographer and keen aesthete, transformed 93 Eaton Square into one of the most elegant and gracious homes in Belgravia, commissioning architect Jeffrey Smith and renowned design house Colefax & Fowler to refurbish and decorate the interiors in English country-house style.

Henry II died in 1987 whilst the refurbishment of the Eaton Square residence was taking place. Kathleen continued to spend six months of the year in Britain, entertaining the likes of Jackie Kennedy and Karl Lagerfeld, and spent the remainder of the time in Florida.  

In 1990, Kathleen loaned the property to Margaret and Dennis Thatcher whilst they were in the process of buying a home for themselves after Mrs Thatcher left office. They settled in nearby Chester Square the following year. 

Today the property retains some of the charm that first attracted the Baldwins, the Fords and the Thatchers, but is primed for a new lease of life.

Quaint: One of the guest bedrooms in the main property has been set up as a twin room with two separate beds. As with all of the rooms in the home, there is plenty of scope for the next buyer to modernise and put their own stamp on the place

Quaint: One of the guest bedrooms in the main property has been set up as a twin room with two separate beds. As with all of the rooms in the home, there is plenty of scope for the next buyer to modernise and put their own stamp on the place

Self-contained: The mews property has this separate kitchen utility suite which can also provide extra storage

A view through the primary residence gives an idea of its scale and size

Self-contained: The mews property has this separate kitchen utility suite which can also provide extra storage (left). Right, a view through the primary residence gives an idea of its scale and size

Swimming in room! The bathroom in the master bedroom suite has an enormous shower in addition to the bath, pictured. Although there is currently just one sink there is space to add a second for his-and-hers accommodation

Swimming in room! The bathroom in the master bedroom suite has an enormous shower in addition to the bath, pictured. Although there is currently just one sink there is space to add a second for his-and-hers accommodation

Making yourself at home: This guest bedroom in the main residence is a welcoming space for family and friends. As well as its own television and vanity table, the room also boasts a large window to give the space some natural light

Making yourself at home: This guest bedroom in the main residence is a welcoming space for family and friends. As well as its own television and vanity table, the room also boasts a large window to give the space some natural light

The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace. 

Double doors lead to the formal dining room which is serviced by a large family kitchen with a central island, complete with a separate utility room. 

The master bedroom suite boasts a bedroom, a study, bathroom and a walk-in wardrobe/dressing room. It also has direct access to a secluded patio garden. 

There are three further bedroom suites, each with an en-suite bathroom, as well as two guest powder rooms.      

Making an entrance: The central staircase of the main entrance creates a sense of grandeur from the moment you walk in

Making an entrance: The central staircase of the main entrance creates a sense of grandeur from the moment you walk in 

Discreet: The entrance to the two-bedroom mews house, which is connected to the primary residence and offers more space

Discreet: The entrance to the two-bedroom mews house, which is connected to the primary residence and offers more space 

The interconnecting mews house at 35 Eaton Mews North has a lower ground floor wine cellar, with accommodation over ground and two upper floors.    

Sales agent Beauchamp Estates highlight that other houses in Eaton Mews North have a full lower ground floor, so planning could be sought to extend the mews house by circa 600 square foot and expand the existing cellar to create a lower ground floor linking to the lower floor in the main residence.

If remodelled, a new super prime residence could be created with VIP bedroom suites in the mews and two floors of reception rooms in the main residence, designed around the grand salon and patio garden. This extended and refurbished property could be worth up to £30million.

Gary Hersham, Founding Director of Beauchamp Estates says: ‘This Blue Plaque residence at 93 Eaton Square has been the Belgravia home of two legendary Prime Ministers, played a role in the 1936 Abdication Crisis, and been the London home of one of America’s most celebrated dynasties. If extended and remodelled, a new super prime residence could be created that could significantly uplift the current value of the property.’

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UK property prices are 30% higher than they were in 2007, Zoopla says

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Average property prices across Britain are now 30 per cent higher than they were at the peak of the market in 2007, before the global financial crash.

Buyers are paying an average of £230,700 for a home, which is the highest on record, according to property portal Zoopla’s latest house price index.

House prices grew by 5.4 per cent in the year to June, but experts at Zoopla said they could start falling as the year draws to an end and the stamp duty holiday and furlough scheme are scrapped.

Price shifts: Average property prices across Britain are now 30% higher than they were at the peak of the market in 2007, according to data from Zoopla

Price shifts: Average property prices across Britain are now 30% higher than they were at the peak of the market in 2007, according to data from Zoopla

While the stamp duty holiday and cheap mortgage deals have given the property market a boost, a severe shortage in stock has also been pushing up prices. 

The number of properties up for sale was around a quarter lower in the first six months of this year than it was at the same point a year ago, Zoopla said.

The stock shortage problem has been exacerbated by a rise in the number of first-time buyers coming to the market, who, of course, have no property to sell.  

Getting more space remains a big draw for many prospective buyers, with demand for houses twice as high as the 2017-19 average, while the popularity of flats has waned. 

Northern Ireland and Wales saw the biggest spike in property prices in the past year, with rises of 8.6 per cent and 8.4 per cent respectively. 

For Wales, this represents the highest rate of annual growth for 16 years, with many areas becoming increasingly popular with relocators and second home owners.

Demand for houses has pushed their price tags up, especially in Wales which proved popular with relocators and second home owners

Demand for houses has pushed their price tags up, especially in Wales which proved popular with relocators and second home owners 

Stock matters: The number of homes being put up for sale has failed to keep up with demand

Stock matters: The number of homes being put up for sale has failed to keep up with demand

This was despite the fact that the Welsh land transaction tax holiday, its equivalent of the stamp duty break, did not apply to second home or buy-to-let purchases.

In Wales and England, buyers could save up to £15,000 in tax on house purchases until 30 June. In England, they can still save up to £2,500 until 30 September. 

At a regional level, house price growth was at its highest in the North West (+7.3 per cent) and Yorkshire & the Humber (+6.8 per cent), while London trailed behind with annual house price growth of +2.3 per cent.  

Demand in London is polarised between inner and outer, with demand in outer London running 86 per cent ahead of the 2017-19 average. 

‘This is explained in part by the available housing stock – with larger volumes of houses and properties with outside space’, Zoopla said.

In contrast, demand in inner London is running just 2 per cent above the ‘normal’ market average. 

This is also reflected in the pricing of properties, with London flats, predominantly clustered towards the centre, dipping by 0.5 per cent in the year to June. In contrast, houses have registered growth of 5.6 per cent in the past year. 

Looking at other major cities, Liverpool has performed well as house prices grew by 8.9 per cent in the past year. 

Rochdale, Bolton and Hastings all saw property prices increase over 9 per cent during the period, while Belfast, Manchester and Sheffield saw prices rise more than 7 per cent. 

Sales levels up and down the country are running about 22 per cent higher than they were last year, but buyer demand slipped 9 per cent in the first half of July after the initial phase of the stamp duty holiday ended. 

However, transaction volumes are still around 80 per cent higher than they would normally be at this time of year. 

Your area: A map showing how house prices have been changing up and down Britain

Your area: A map showing how house prices have been changing up and down Britain

Grainne Gilmore, head of research at Zoopla, said: ‘Demand is moderating from record high levels earlier this year, but remains significantly up from typical levels, signalling that above average activity levels will continue in the coming months.

‘Demand for houses is still outstripping demand for flats. To a certain extent this trend will have been augmented by the stamp duty holiday, with bigger savings on offer for larger properties – typically houses. 

‘But underneath this, there is a continued drumbeat of demand for more space among buyers, both inside and outside, funnelling demand towards houses, resulting in stronger price growth for these properties.’

She added: ‘Overall buyer demand coupled with constrained supply signal that price growth will continue to rise in the coming months, peaking at around 6 per cent, before falling back to between 4 per cent to 5 per cent by the end of 2021.’ 

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EU pauses legal action against UK over Northern Ireland protocol

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The European Commission has paused legal proceedings against the United Kingdom over the implementation of the Northern Ireland protocol in the hope that solutions can be found.

It comes after the UK government called for a “standstill period” in which the EU would not further legal action and the UK would also refrain from unilateral moves.

A European Commission spokesman said in a statement that “in order to provide the necessary space to reflect on these issues and find durable solutions to the implementation of the protocol, we have decided, at this stage, not to move to the next stage of the infringement procedure, started in March”.

Last week the UK’s Brexit minister, David Frost, told the House of Commons there should be a “significant change” in the protocol and that “we cannot go on as we are”.

The commission said the pause in the legal action would be used to consider the UK’s proposals.

“We confirm our readiness to continue to engage with the United Kingdom, also on the suggestions made in the Command Paper, and to consider any proposals that respect the principles of the protocol,” the statement from the commission added.

The Irish Government has also said it will carefully consider the British proposals, which include suggestions that were raised and discussed during the negotiation process.

“We have received a constructive reply from the Commission in response to our request for a standstill on existing arrangements,” a British government spokeswoman said. “We look forward to engaging in talks with the EU in the weeks ahead to progress the proposals in our command paper.

“As we set out in the Command Paper last week, significant changes are needed to ensure the Pprotocol is sustainable for future”

Last week, Mr Frost suggested a tiered system in which goods produced for consumption in Northern Ireland only would not need to be inspected at Irish Sea crossing points, and that goods that were made to standards that equalled those of the EU should be able to circulate freely.

‘Impossible’ steps

Other proposals included abolishing export certification, state aid rules and the oversight of the European Court of Justice, encompassing several steps that are seen as impossible for EU capitals to agree to.

Both Brussels and Dublin are seen to be keen to cool the heat on the issue of Northern Ireland and encourage negotiations to find solutions for any problems through the pathways laid out by the withdrawal agreement and trade deal wherever possible.

The commission warned that it would not renegotiate the protocol, which was negotiated and agreed by both sides as a way to allow Britain to leave the single market and customs union while avoiding the need for checks across the island of Ireland.

UK prime minister Boris Johnson originally praised the deal as a “reasonable, fair outcome” and a “very good deal” for both sides, but his government has since said it has been implemented in a stricter manner than foreseen.

“The EU has sought flexible, practical solutions to overcome the difficulties citizens in Northern Ireland are experiencing regarding the implementation of the protocol – as demonstrated in the package of measures announced by the commission on June 30th,” a commission spokeswoman said.

“While the EU will not renegotiate the protocol, we stand ready to address all the issues arising in the practical implementation of the protocol in a spirit of good faith and co-operation.”

It added that if was essential that “constructive discussions” continue in the coming weeks.

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Cladding repair bill is same as £230k price of this Hertfordshire flat

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When homeowner Sophie Bichener, 29, bought her flat in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, in 2017 for £230,000, she had no idea about the potentially crippling costs that lay ahead.

She moved into the flat just before the fire at Grenfell Tower, in West London, which caused 72 deaths.

Like so many other purchasers, Sophie bought moved into her flat believing that it was safe because it complied with building regulations. 

However, her flat has since deemed to be unsafe in the wake of the Grenfell fire.

Since the Grenfell Tower fire in 2017, concerns about cladding have become a national issue

Since the Grenfell Tower fire in 2017, concerns about cladding have become a national issue

Like so many other flat owners affected by fire safety issues, she has been left unable to sell her property, as mortgage lenders will no longer offer loans without fresh proof of safety. 

Her block of flats has been deemed unsafe and fire safety repairs need to be carried out. 

But the bill for the repairs are eye-watering, almost matching what she originally paid for the flat. 

This summer she was quoted £202,077 to fix just her flat, which is not far from the £230,000 that she originally paid for her home.

She understands that some of the £14million-plus costs to fix her block will be met from the Building Safety Fund, but it is not yet known how much financial assistance – if any – she will get.

This leaves her facing the unknown, a situation many flat owners find themselves in through no fault of their own.  

She says it is likely that she will have to relocate during the works for at least a month.

Sophie Bichener, 29, bought her flat in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 2017 for £230,000, but has since been quoted £202,077 to fix her flat, which has deemed to be unsafe

Sophie Bichener, 29, bought her flat in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 2017 for £230,000, but has since been quoted £202,077 to fix her flat, which has deemed to be unsafe

Her block is home to 73 flats spread across 14 storeys. It is above 18 metres and had problems with combustible cladding and missing fire breaks.

It is unknown when the fire safety work is expected to begin as the Government has yet to confirm whether it will provide funding for her block.

But once the work does start, it is suggested that it could take 52 weeks, meaning Sophie would be effectively living on what would look like a building site for a year.

The block has already paid for six months of a waking watch at a cost of £600 a month per flat. Those payments stopped following the installation of new fire alarms.

Sophie told MailOnline Property: ‘We have a supportive network of leaseholders and so you can take time out from dealing with it. However, being in lockdown and in the flat twenty-four seven means I’ve spent a lot of time trying to figure this out.

‘Knowing that when you go to work that money has already been spent has been disheartening.

‘We just have to do what we can. It is easier for me to talk about it now, but there are people I know who are suicidal. While the Government is playing ‘who is to pay’, leaseholders are struggling to survive.’

‘We have had to put our life on hold. I can’t spend any money as I know I shall have a bill at the end of all of this, although I don’t know how much that will be.

‘I’d like to get married and have children, but simply cannot afford to contemplate that at the moment.’

Campaigners have called ministers of ignoring cladding victims’ screams for help.

Stephen McPartland, MP for Stevenage, said: ‘Ministers have betrayed leaseholders like Sophie. Ignoring their screams for help, dismissing their dreams and refusing to listen.

‘Leaseholders need practical support, not more weasel words and I will continue to fight for people like Sophie.

‘Leaseholders are not to blame, but they are facing devastating mental health and financial costs as they are left to pay more in remediating their flats, than they are now worth. It is a tragic market failure and we must step in as a government to support them.’

It follows an announcement by Robert Jenrick that neither leaseholders nor taxpayers should pay for dangerous cladding to be removed. 

He said that the law will be changed retrospectively to give homeowners 15 years to take action against their developers for shoddy workmanship.  

A MHCLG spokesman responded, saying: “Building owners should make buildings safe without passing on costs to leaseholders – and we will introduce a new legal requirement for owners of high-rise buildings to prove they have tried all routes to cover the cost of fixing their buildings.

“We are processing applications to the Building Safety Fund as quickly as possible – and we have been clear that we will fund the removal of dangerous cladding from high rise building where remediation is necessary.

“Our approach strikes the right balance in our continuing commitment to protecting leaseholders and being fair to taxpayers – while reassuring lenders that where cladding remediation is needed, costs will not be a barrier or mean that mortgage payments become unmanageable.”

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