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Belgravia home of Prime Minister Stanley goes on the market for £23million

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A stunning Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. 

The sprawling residence at 93 Eaton Square consists of a main four-bedroom home and an interconnecting mews house with two further bedrooms. 

In addition the property boasts grand reception rooms, spacious patio gardens and eight bathrooms. 

While it is a charming example of a traditional period property, developers estimate it could be worth up to £30million if the next owner was willing to invest in modernising, extending and integrating the two homes to create a single super-prime property complete with mega basement. 

Period features: A Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. Pictured, the dining room where politicians and royalty have been entertained

Period features: A Grade II-listed Belgravia property that was once home to Prime Ministers Stanley Baldwin and Margaret Thatcher has gone on sale for £23million. Pictured, the dining room where politicians and royalty have been entertained

Grand: The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace

Grand: The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace

At-home spa: The main bedroom suite boasts this spacious bathroom with a luxurious sunken tub and mirror surround. The suite also boasts a study, walk-in dressing room/wardrobe and direct access to the private patio garden

At-home spa: The main bedroom suite boasts this spacious bathroom with a luxurious sunken tub and mirror surround. The suite also boasts a study, walk-in dressing room/wardrobe and direct access to the private patio garden 

Equipped for entertaining: The dining room in the main four-bedroom property is served by this large family kitchen complete with an island and a separate pantry and utility room (seen through the door on the right)

Equipped for entertaining: The dining room in the main four-bedroom property is served by this large family kitchen complete with an island and a separate pantry and utility room (seen through the door on the right)

Steeped in history: Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches

Steeped in history: Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin, then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children

In 1990, the property was briefly home to Margaret Thatcher (right) and her husband Dennis after she left office

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin (left), then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children. In 1990, the property was briefly home to Margaret Thatcher (right) and her husband Dennis after she left office

Quiet oasis: The property has access to the lush green gardens at the heart of the square (pictured) which offer an escape from the bustle of the city. There is also a separate patio garden off the back of the main residence

Quiet oasis: The property has access to the lush green gardens at the heart of the square (pictured) which offer an escape from the bustle of the city. There is also a separate patio garden off the back of the main residence 

Built in the 1820s, Eaton Square, is largest private garden square and is encircled by a terrace of grand residences designed in classical style with projecting Doric colonnade and porches.

In 1913, Stanley Baldwin, then the MP for Bewdley, moved into No. 93 with his wife, Lucy, and their children.

It was in the dining room and adjoining living spaces that Baldwin entertained his cousin and close friend Rudyard Kipling, as well as high profile figures including Winston Churchill, Neville Chamberlain (who lived at No. 37) and the Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII. 

Baldwin became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1922 and Prime Minister in 1923, a post he would hold three times (1923-34, 1924-1929 and 1935-1937). 

In the 1980s, the residence became home to Hendry Ford II, grandson of Ford Motor Company Henry Ford, and his wife, Kathleen DuRoss ford. 

The wealthy Americans bought the property as a city pied-a-terre, in addition to their British country house, Turville Grange, an 18th century manor house near Henley-on-Thames that Henry II had owned since the 1970s. 

Ultimate luxury: The master bedroom, pictured, is traditionally decorated but could be renovated and transformed with a more modern treatment. The large room has space for a king-sized bed and opens directly out onto the patio garden

Ultimate luxury: The master bedroom, pictured, is traditionally decorated but could be renovated and transformed with a more modern treatment. The large room has space for a king-sized bed and opens directly out onto the patio garden

Cosy corner: The study, pictured, is part of the master bedroom suite of rooms and also opens out onto the garden patio. At the moment it is used as a private living room but there would be plenty of space to install a desk to work from home

Cosy corner: The study, pictured, is part of the master bedroom suite of rooms and also opens out onto the garden patio. At the moment it is used as a private living room but there would be plenty of space to install a desk to work from home

Extra accommodation: Attached to the primary residence is a second mews house with two bedrooms. This could be used to house staff, elderly family members or visitors. Above, one of the two bedrooms on offer in the mews house

Extra accommodation: Attached to the primary residence is a second mews house with two bedrooms. This could be used to house staff, elderly family members or visitors. Above, one of the two bedrooms on offer in the mews house

Tucked away: One of the highlights of the property is this large, split-level patio garden which would be ideal for summer parties. It has direct access to the master bedroom and largest guest bedroom in the main house

Tucked away: One of the highlights of the property is this large, split-level patio garden which would be ideal for summer parties. It has direct access to the master bedroom and largest guest bedroom in the main house

Kathleen DuRoss Ford, a former model, accomplished photographer and keen aesthete, transformed 93 Eaton Square into one of the most elegant and gracious homes in Belgravia, commissioning architect Jeffrey Smith and renowned design house Colefax & Fowler to refurbish and decorate the interiors in English country-house style.

Henry II died in 1987 whilst the refurbishment of the Eaton Square residence was taking place. Kathleen continued to spend six months of the year in Britain, entertaining the likes of Jackie Kennedy and Karl Lagerfeld, and spent the remainder of the time in Florida.  

In 1990, Kathleen loaned the property to Margaret and Dennis Thatcher whilst they were in the process of buying a home for themselves after Mrs Thatcher left office. They settled in nearby Chester Square the following year. 

Today the property retains some of the charm that first attracted the Baldwins, the Fords and the Thatchers, but is primed for a new lease of life.

Quaint: One of the guest bedrooms in the main property has been set up as a twin room with two separate beds. As with all of the rooms in the home, there is plenty of scope for the next buyer to modernise and put their own stamp on the place

Quaint: One of the guest bedrooms in the main property has been set up as a twin room with two separate beds. As with all of the rooms in the home, there is plenty of scope for the next buyer to modernise and put their own stamp on the place

Self-contained: The mews property has this separate kitchen utility suite which can also provide extra storage

A view through the primary residence gives an idea of its scale and size

Self-contained: The mews property has this separate kitchen utility suite which can also provide extra storage (left). Right, a view through the primary residence gives an idea of its scale and size

Swimming in room! The bathroom in the master bedroom suite has an enormous shower in addition to the bath, pictured. Although there is currently just one sink there is space to add a second for his-and-hers accommodation

Swimming in room! The bathroom in the master bedroom suite has an enormous shower in addition to the bath, pictured. Although there is currently just one sink there is space to add a second for his-and-hers accommodation

Making yourself at home: This guest bedroom in the main residence is a welcoming space for family and friends. As well as its own television and vanity table, the room also boasts a large window to give the space some natural light

Making yourself at home: This guest bedroom in the main residence is a welcoming space for family and friends. As well as its own television and vanity table, the room also boasts a large window to give the space some natural light

The main residence has an entrance hall leading on to the grand main reception rooms, which boasts a 14ft high ceiling, original ceiling coving, three full height sash windows overlooking the garden square and a Regency feature fireplace. 

Double doors lead to the formal dining room which is serviced by a large family kitchen with a central island, complete with a separate utility room. 

The master bedroom suite boasts a bedroom, a study, bathroom and a walk-in wardrobe/dressing room. It also has direct access to a secluded patio garden. 

There are three further bedroom suites, each with an en-suite bathroom, as well as two guest powder rooms.      

Making an entrance: The central staircase of the main entrance creates a sense of grandeur from the moment you walk in

Making an entrance: The central staircase of the main entrance creates a sense of grandeur from the moment you walk in 

Discreet: The entrance to the two-bedroom mews house, which is connected to the primary residence and offers more space

Discreet: The entrance to the two-bedroom mews house, which is connected to the primary residence and offers more space 

The interconnecting mews house at 35 Eaton Mews North has a lower ground floor wine cellar, with accommodation over ground and two upper floors.    

Sales agent Beauchamp Estates highlight that other houses in Eaton Mews North have a full lower ground floor, so planning could be sought to extend the mews house by circa 600 square foot and expand the existing cellar to create a lower ground floor linking to the lower floor in the main residence.

If remodelled, a new super prime residence could be created with VIP bedroom suites in the mews and two floors of reception rooms in the main residence, designed around the grand salon and patio garden. This extended and refurbished property could be worth up to £30million.

Gary Hersham, Founding Director of Beauchamp Estates says: ‘This Blue Plaque residence at 93 Eaton Square has been the Belgravia home of two legendary Prime Ministers, played a role in the 1936 Abdication Crisis, and been the London home of one of America’s most celebrated dynasties. If extended and remodelled, a new super prime residence could be created that could significantly uplift the current value of the property.’

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Djokovic violated Australia’s highest national value – a ‘fair go’

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Every few years, a celebrity tries to test out the Australian border and in a nationalistic show of strength they are sent packing.

To the outside world it might seem from time to time that Australia chooses a celebrity to sacrifice at the altar of sovereignty. It must seem we make an example out of them, to scare everyone else off lying on their immigration forms and from smuggling forbidden, squashed fruit from the aeroplane meal into the country.

Things got a bit heated back in 2015 when Johnny Depp and Amber Heard sneaked their dogs into the island nation with a delicate ecosystem and a fondness for biosecurity. It escalated when the now deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce threatened to have the dogs put down.

Depp and Heard ended up copping a fine, complying with procedures and were made to film a video apologising to Australia in a performance as natural and warm as a hostage proof of life tape.

Depp eventually turned around and said Joyce looked like he was “inbred with a tomato”, but only after he was safely back in the US, like the notable big man he is. Deputy PM Joyce recently shot back in trademark eloquence calling Depp a “deadshit” live on national breakfast television.

Citizens of other (more boring) countries might be dismayed that their national 2ic would trade verbal blows with Captain Jack Sparrow. Not Australians though, who are taught in high school that our economy and trade could be threatened by an outbreak caused from improperly imported fauna and flora. We said “Good onya Barnaby” for applying the rules fairly and squarely, regardless of stardom.

There was broad support for his actions at the time, just as there has for the cancellation of Novak Djokovic’s visa. There has been a lot of legal wrangling involving the Balkan bad boy of tennis, who is now to be deported, but for Australians the stoush was really over one thing: did he try to get around the rules?

There’s a lot of overseas analysis around the Australian public and the political will behind pursuing the case against the tennis star. After all “Djoker” (Jock-a), as he’s known here, is one of the biggest crowd-drawing players at the Australian Open, a banner event in a country where sport is the default religion. Why not let this one slide?

It’s being said that Australians just love rules. But I think this is over simplistic. What Australians actually love is fairness. In past surveys Australians have listed “fairness” and getting a “fair go” as their highest national values. There is an expectation that it doesn’t matter who the person is, they should be treated equally. We hate special treatment, particularly when it’s a public figure appearing to bend the rules the rest of us are following.

In Ireland sometimes there is the ‘ah here, sure look, go on ahead’ approach. This can be a publican letting patrons stay for a sneaky lock in, the bus driver letting you on when you don’t have correct change, but also includes say a person keeping their high-profile job after attending a certain golf function.

Rules in Ireland are bent for people we know, just as we give jobs, rentals and sometimes vaccines to people we know, in the name of “helping out”. This is seen as a positive thing by those receiving the favour, and “nepotism” by others.

Of course, Australia also has favouritism and nepotism but we like to think we don’t. Rules equate to fairness. Everybody has to be inconvenienced equally. Someone trying to get around rules when the rest of us are stuck following rules, even if they’re ones we hate, deserves to be punished.

Covid-19 has exacerbated the situation. No one is enjoying Covid rules. “I am doing the right thing, and it’s deprived me of joy just so this utter tiprat next to me can ignore them at will” is the angry thought rattling around in our rage filled brains.

Australians have not forgotten the 40,000 or so “stranded Aussies” who remained stuck overseas thanks to strict border controls during the pandemic. Those who did not get to see dying parents or hold their own children. A multi-millionaire tennis player seemingly looking for a loophole to hit a ball about for a few weeks because he refused to be vaccinated was never going to go down well.

When Djokovic stayed at the Park Hotel, the only people who might have been happy to see him were the asylum seekers who have been held there for years by the Australian Government while they await processing. They made signs and waved to TV cameras, hoping to draw attention to the “rules” keeping them locked up without an end in sight.

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Interiors trends for 2022: It’s all about vibrant designs and natural textures

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Some home trends last the course (think sustainable design and open-plan living), while others are, thankfully, fleeting (goodbye matching furniture and round beds). 

But there are a few we can count on to stay the distance this year.

So here’s what we think will be in vogue for the next 12 months.

Jaunty: A striped armchair. Curves, spheres, lozenges and circular silhouettes reflect our current desire for a greater sense of flexibility in the way we merge work and play

Jaunty: A striped armchair. Curves, spheres, lozenges and circular silhouettes reflect our current desire for a greater sense of flexibility in the way we merge work and play

Soft shapes

Curves, spheres, lozenges and circular silhouettes reflect our current desire for a greater sense of flexibility in the way we merge work and play.

‘You can expect to see more organic shapes coming to the forefront in terms of furniture,’ says the Dining Chair Co’s Amanda Huber. 

‘Curved designs feature softer lines, creating a less strict and more informal setting.’ Check out the gracious shape of Soho Home’s Luciana sofa, £2,495.

Playful pieces

The latest interiors don’t take themselves too seriously — the idea is to elevate simple materials or use them in a creative way.

Think wide, jaunty stripes on an overscaled armchair (take a look at Buchanan Studio’s Studio chair, £2,394, for inspiration), half-length linen café curtains used as cupboard skirts, and trims, tassels, bobbles and fringing on curtains, lampshades and upholstery. 

Relaxed, unfitted kitchens also feed into this look: Buster + Punch’s latest foray into freestanding cabinetry is designed to easily adapt to lifestyle shifts.

Earthy: Bold, natural colours are set to have a resurgence in our homes next year

Earthy: Bold, natural colours are set to have a resurgence in our homes next year 

Colour confidence

More of us are experimenting with colour — whether that’s mixing bold primary tones, colour washing our walls or choosing confident finishes such as all-gloss or soft plaster. 

Warm hues and nature’s tones are set to prevail, from rich terracotta and sand to olive and deeper greens.

This calming, earthy palette suits our renewed connection to nature during the ebbs and flows of the pandemic, when ‘home’ has become a byword for sanctuary. Look out for calming and uplifting bright blues.

Handcrafted appeal

Items that feature the hand of their maker inject individuality, such as the beautifully detailed pieces of Galvin Brothers: the Bobbin Side Table, £375, or the Fluted Cabinet, £4,800, both future design classics, which take inspiration from the shape of ancient columns.

Introduce handcrafted appeal through lighting, too. Susie Atkinson’s Plato lamp bases, inspired by 1940s conical leather lamps, are coated in high gloss colours. They work well with a hand-painted or trimmed shade; Rosi de Ruig’s are a timeless option, priced from £60.

Swish: Bert & May¿s Ric Rac tile from designer Samantha Todhunter

Swish: Bert & May’s Ric Rac tile from designer Samantha Todhunter

Mindful design

Lessening our impact on the planet remains key. 

‘Sustainability is not a trend, but a key design principle,’ says Kelling Designs’ Emma Deterding. 

‘It’s about changing our mindset to embrace upcycling, reupholstering and repairing.’ 

This also translates into buying fewer but better pieces and researching provenance.

‘Seek out items made from recycled materials, such as outdoor furniture produced from recycled aluminium, upcycled fabrics or fabric leftovers for upholstery, and recycled glass for tableware and tops,’ says interior designer Claudia Ludwig.

Flexible living

With many of us required to work from home at a moment’s notice, our living spaces need to accommodate relaxing, escaping, cooking and working. So quality joinery is high priority.

‘All of my projects focus on it, from library style shelving and desks to concealed storage,’ says interior designer Louise Robinson.

‘Another trend that has become hugely popular is open-plan layouts and indoor/outdoor living, which is set to continue as we try to reclaim our homes from pandemic living,’ says Fionnuala Johnston, senior home designer at John Lewis.

Try textures

The trick is to look for less obvious ways to introduce these familiar elements. Try opting for warm oak internal doors rather than ubiquitous Crittall; lining front door surrounds and frames with richly veined marble or using tactile Zellige tiles in bathrooms and kitchens.

Check out Bert & May’s new Ric Rac collection with designer Samantha Todhunter, whose pattern is inspired by the ric rac ribbon she used to sew onto the Spanish dancing skirts she made as a child.

Global interiors

Armchair travel is on the rise as many are reluctant to take risks.

That translates to confident interiors that are embracing global design motifs, from deeply pictorial wallpaper such as Osborne & Little’s Portovenere, featuring retro Ligurian village scenes, £94 per roll, to patterned flora and fauna soft furnishings.

Charming ceramics

Spanish and Italian handmade pottery is enjoying a resurgence. See the vintage collection at The Edition 94, from £40 per plate and the range of decorative jugs, plates and dishes by traditional maker Cerámica J. Marín, available at Liberty.

Savings of the week! Winter duvets

Dunelm¿s Fogarty Soft Touch microfibre-filled duvet costs from £17.60 to £35, depending on size

Dunelm’s Fogarty Soft Touch microfibre-filled duvet costs from £17.60 to £35, depending on size

Fuel bills are set to soar. Since turning up your thermostat against winter chills will harm the wallet this year, consider a new duvet, an item on which heartwarming savings are now available,

This will also be an investment in better sleep, improving your health and mood in the morning. 

If you share your bed, a 10.5 tog rating duvet should be sufficiently cosy.

Dunelm’s Fogarty Soft Touch microfibre-filled duvet costs from £17.60 to £35, depending on size, a 20 per cent reduction. 

A kingsize costs £33.60, down from £42. For a little more, you can have the microfibre-filled Feels-Like-Down duvet from bedding store Julian Charles, which costs from £55 to £85, a 50 per cent reduction. 

The Woolroom Deluxe costs from £112.50 after a 25 per cent reduction

The Woolroom Deluxe costs from £112.50 after a 25 per cent reduction

The price of the kingsize is £75, down from £150.

Happy to splurge? Then prices for Marks & Spencer’s Luxury Siberian goosedown duvet start at £192, down 40 per cent.

Should you dream of snuggling up under a British wool-filled duvet, the Woolroom Deluxe costs from £112.50 after a 25 per cent reduction. 

The kingsize is £157.50 down from £210.

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One winner claims €19m Lotto jackpot in first ‘will be won’ draw

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After more than 60 draws over seven months the €19.06 million National Lottery jackpot was finally won tonight by one person who matched all six numbers.

The jackpot had remained capped at €19.06 million since October 2nd and had not been won since June last year. It is the biggest National Lottery jackpot win in in the State.

The jackpot numbers drawn were: 2, 9, 16, 30, 37, 40 while the bonus number was 23.

Tonight had been the first “will be won” National Lottery draw which could have seen the prize shared among those who matched five numbers and a bonus number, or, if still no winners, those who matched five numbers, in the absence of an overall winner.

However, this process was not required as one lucky person matched all six numbers.

Almost €5.5 million was shared by 149 players who matched five numbers and the bonus number.

The National Lottery said it would will reveal details on where the winning ticket was sold in the coming days.

A spokesman for the National Lottery advised everyone who played to check their tickets.

“If they are the lucky winner, we encourage them to sign the back of the ticket immediately and contact our prize claims team on 1800 666 222 or email claims@lottery.ie , and we will make arrangements for you to collect your prize.”

Earlier the Lotto app and website came under severe strain ahead of the first “will be won” jackpot draw.

Some users of the Lotto App were confronted with this message in the minutes shortly before the cut-off to buy tickets.
Some users of the Lotto App were confronted with this message in the minutes shortly before the cut-off to buy tickets.

Some players seeking to play via the Lotto app shortly before the 7.45pm cut-off were told that “due to high traffic volumes we are experiencing technical difficulties”.

The National Lottery website was also displaying a “currently unavailable” message shortly before the draw at 8pm.

Sales of tickets for tonight’s draw were reported to have been significantly higher than a standard draw.

The succession of jackpot rollovers had prompted the operator of the National Lottery, Premier Lotteries Ireland, to seek the addition of the “will be won” draw.

In future lottery jackpots will only rollover five times once the prize cap has been reached.

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