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Anniversary of 1965 War: Pakistan PM Slams India for Refusing a Peaceful Co-Existence

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Islamabad says it will not resume its peace process with New Delhi until Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government walks back its decision to abrogate the semi-autonomous status of Jammu and Kashmir. The Indian Parliament’s 2019 decision was also rejected by China, as Beijing has its own designs on the region.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan on Monday accused India of being “against the idea of peaceful co-existence” since the founding of the Islamic democracy in 1947, and blamed his southern neighbor of “imposing” one war after another on Islamabad.

“Whether it was during the War on Terror spanning two decades or the wars in 1948, 1965 or 1971, subversive activities inside Pakistan or propaganda through cyber warfare, the enemy has been carrying out operations against us,” Khan said in a statement in Urdu, posted on his Facebook page.

The statement was made to commemorate the 1965 India-Pakistan War, a conflict in which Islamabad believes it got the better of India.

“…we are not only fully capable of defending the homeland, but are always ready to deal with any kind of aggression,” stated Khan, hailing his nation’s forces for repelling “Indian aggressors” during the 1965 war, as well as the other wars including a 1948 war and the 1971 Bangladesh War of Liberation.

The 1948 India-Pakistan War occurred after Islamabad-backed Islamist militias and army regulars invaded the predominantly Muslim state of Jammu and Kashmir, in the wake of its then-Hindu king acceding to India after the subcontinent’s independence from Great Britain in 1947. By the time Delhi mounted a counter-offensive, Pakistan-backed forces had overrun large parts of Kashmir. Since then, parts of Jammu and Kashmir are separately administered by both New Delhi and Islamabad.


©
AP Photo / Mukhtar Khan

An Indian paramilitary soldier stands guard at a check point during restrictions in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Aug 30, 2019. India on Thursday said it has information that Pakistan is trying to infiltrate terrorists into the country to carry out attacks amid rising tensions over New Delhi’s decision to abrogate the autonomy of Indian-administered Kashmir

The 1971 Bangladesh War of Liberation saw Delhi stepping in to militarily help erstwhile East Pakistan (present-day Bangladesh), after a bloody crackdown by Islamabad on Bengali-speaking Muslims in the region led to a mass exodus of refugees into India’s eastern states. Ultimately, the Indian military intervention led to a bifurcation of Pakistan and the creation of a separate nation, Bangladesh, which was under Pakistan’s control from 1947 until 1971.

Khan further credited Islamabad’s “successful foreign policy” for “exposing India’s real face” in Jammu and Kashmir, as he predicted that Delhi would have to roll back its 2019 decision to rescind the semi-autonomous status of the region.

“The international community acknowledges that the only way to peace in the region is to resolve the Kashmir issue in accordance with UN Security Council resolutions,” Khan said, calling on the UN to hold India “accountable” for the latter’s policies in the region.

India has repeatedly rejected what it characterizes as Pakistan’s interference in Jammu and Kashmir, dismissing the instability as an “internal matter”.

The Pakistan prime minister used the occasion to again target India for attempting to create “instability” in the country through Afghanistan during the administration of fugitive president Ashraf Ghani.

Before last month’s takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban*, Islamabad claimed it had “irrefutable evidence” that India was operating over 65 terrorist training camps inside Afghanistan for Pakistan-focused violent jihadi groups such as the Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP) and the Balochistan Liberation Army (BLA). 

In November 2020, Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi claimed that Indian agencies were targeting infrastructure projects under the control of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), the flagship initiative of the Beijing-funded ‘One Belt One Road’ trade route. 

Who ‘Won’ the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War?

Both India and Pakistan claim that they emerged victorious in a war that, according to neutral reports, some 7,500 people were killed.

Per historical accounts reported by Indian news website The Quint, Pakistani forces tried to push nearly 30,000 soldiers and other militants into the erstwhile Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir (India withdrew its statehood in 2019) as part of ‘Operation Gibraltar’, an act Pakistani generals at the time admitted was meant to trigger a popular anti-India uprising in the Kashmir region. The assault failed to produce the desired results, according to General Muhammad Musa Khan, the head of the Pakistani Army at the time.

In another invasion against India days after Operation Gibraltar, Pakistani forces attacked the city of Akhnoor in Jammu and Kashmir. In retaliation for Pakistan’s second attack, India’s then Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri ordered Indian troops to cross into Pakistan, with Indian forces reaching the doorstep of Lahore, according to a BBC report dated 6 September 1965.

The war was resolved with the signing of the Tashkent Declaration on 10 January 1966. The Moscow-brokered treaty, signed in Uzbekistan’s capital city, saw both governments agree to give up on each other’s territories occupied during the war.


*The Taliban is a terrorist organization banned in Russia and many other states.



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[Ticker] US to lift Covid travel-ban on EU tourists

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Fully vaccinated travellers from the EU and the UK will be let back into the US from “early November” onward, the White House said on Monday, ending an 18-month ban and prompting airline firms’ shares to climb. “This new international travel system follows the science to keep Americans … safe,” a US spokesman said. The EU recently recommended increased restrictions on US visitors, amid anger at lack of US reciprocity.

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Ten women and girls killed every day in Mexico, Amnesty report says | Global development

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At least 10 women and girls are murdered every day in Mexico, according to a new report that says victims’ families are often left to carry out their own homicide investigations.

The scathing report, released on Monday by Amnesty International, documents both the scale of the violence and the disturbing lack of interest on the part of Mexican authorities to prevent or solve the murders.

“Mexico is continuing to fail to fulfil its duty to investigate and, therefore, its duty to guarantee the rights to life and personal integrity of the victims as well as to prevent violence against women,” says the report, Justice on Trial.

“Feminicidal violence and the failings in investigation and prevention in northern Mexico are not anecdotal, but rather form part of a broader reality in the country,” the report adds.

Femicide has been rife in Mexico for decades – most notoriously in an epidemic of murders which claimed the life of some 400 women in the border city Ciudad Juárez during the 1990s. In recent years, a growing feminist movement has held massive street protests against the violence, but authorities have proved unwilling to take action to stop the killing.

“It’s always a question of political will,” said Maricruz Ocampo, a women’s activist in the state of Querétaro.

Ocampo has been part of teams lobbying state governors to issue an alert when femicides reach scandalously high levels – a move to raise awareness and mobilise resources. But officials often resist such moves, she said, as governors worry about their states’ images and investment.

“They refuse to recognise there is a problem,” she said.

The president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, has also downplayed the problem. He branded the women protesting on 8 March, International Women’s Day, as “conservatives” and alleged a dark hand manipulating the demonstrations.

When asked last year about rising violence against women, he responded, “Tell all the women of Mexico that they are protected and represented, that we’re doing everything possible to guarantee peace and quiet and that I understand that our adversaries are looking for ways to confront us.”

Mexico recorded the murders of 3,723 women in 2020. Some 940 of those murders were investigated as femicides.

The Amnesty report focused on Mexico state, a vast collection of gritty suburbs surrounding Mexico City on three sides. It has become notorious for femicides over the past decade – and for the way the former president, Enrique Peña Nieto, a former Mexico state governor, ignored the problem.

The report found cases of families carrying out their own detective work, which were ignored by investigators. In many cases, authorities contaminated crime scenes or mishandled evidence. They often did not even pursue leads such as geolocation information from victims’ mobile phones.

In the case of Julia Sosa, whose children believe she was killed by her partner, two daughters found her body buried on the suspect’s property – but had to wait hours for police to arrive and process the crime scene. One of her daughters recalled the subsequent interview process, in which “the police officer was falling asleep”.

Sosa’s partner hanged himself, prompting police to close the case, even though family members said there were more leads to pursue.

In states rife with drug cartel violence, activists say cases of femicides go uninvestigated as impunity is commonplace.

“The authorities say it’s organised crime and that’s it,” said Yolotzin Jaimes, a women’s rights campaigner in the southern state of Guerrero. “Many of these aggressors find protection under the excuse of organised crime.”

The persistence of femicides is a stark contrast to recent gains by the women’s movement in Mexico. The country’s supreme court decriminalised abortion earlier this month. A new congress recently sworn in has gender parity and seven female governors will be installed by the end of year – up from just two before last June’s election’s

The decriminalisation of abortion “let off some steam” from the pressure driving the protests “because part of the demands was over the right to choose,” Ocampo said. “But when it comes to violence, we still see it everywhere.”

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US official urges EU to speed up enlargement

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Gabriel Escobar, the US’ newly-appointed acting deputy secretary of state for South Central Europe, has urged Europe to speed up Western Balkans enlargement. “To return 20 years later and see that there hasn’t been much progress on that front was a little disappointing,” he told the RFE/RL news agency Friday, referring to his last post in Europe in 2001. “We would like to see a more rapid integration,” he said.

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