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What does the base rate rise to 0.75% mean for you?

The Bank of England has upped the base rate for the third time since December as it attempts to keep a lid on soaring inflation.

The base rate has risen from 0.5 per cent to 0.75 per cent, having been previously upped from 0.1 per cent to 0.25 per cent in December and 0.25 per cent to 0.5 per cent last month.

The decision taken by the Monetary Policy Committee today was made due to inflationary pressures, although economists suggest it will do little to stem cost of living rises triggered by energy, petrol and food prices.

Savers will be hoping that the base rate rise will mean they get better interest rates on their savings accounts. 

Most homeowners who have fixed rate mortgage deals won’t be affected immediately, but are likely to find remortgaging in future more expensive.

Those with variable rate mortgages are likely to see monthly costs rise imminently. 

The Bank of England has upped the base rate for the third time in three months as it attempts to keep a lid on soaring inflation.

The Bank of England has upped the base rate for the third time in three months as it attempts to keep a lid on soaring inflation.

Why raise interest rates?

With inflation at 5.5 per cent as of January and expected to peak over the coming months, the government’s 2 per cent inflation target is far from being met.

The base rate determines the interest rate the Bank of England pays to banks that hold money with it and influences the rates those banks charge people to borrow money.

By raising the cost of borrowing, monetary policy seeks to lower demand for it, which dampens the economy and the amount of money banks create in new loans.

A better return on savings also encourages people to put more money aside, but with rates near rock bottom the effect is negligible. 

Savers will be hoping that the base rate will inject some much needed stimulus into the savings market, particularly given that rates have not risen by as much as some might have hoped, following the previous two base rate decisions.

Mortgage borrowers will be preparing for further rate hikes, with the Bank of England’s decision likely to drive up the cost of borrowing. Mortgage rates have already risen substantially over the past months from the record lows they were at.

What does the base rate rise mean for savers? 

Only one in ten banks and building societies have passed on February’s Bank of England base rate rise to Britain’s long-suffering savers, according to analysis by Defaqto.

In fact, it revealed that only 42 out of 99 savings providers have boosted rates for savers in the past six weeks, with many easy access accounts with top banks still sitting at 0.01 per cent.

After today’s announcement, Yorkshire Building Society announced that it would increase the interest rates on 96 per cent of its variable savings accounts, with the rates going up as much as 0.65 per cent.  

Those keeping an eye on the top of the savings best buy tables will have noticed some positive changes

Those keeping an eye on the top of the savings best buy tables will have noticed some positive changes

Unrestricted access accounts will rise to a minimum of 0.85 per cent, and restricted accounts to 0.90 per cent.  

The average easy access account has only risen by 0.05 per cent since December, according to Moneyfacts, from 0.2 to 0.25 per cent.

However, whilst the situation has barely improved for many savers, those who keep their cash with building societies and challenger banks will likely have seen some positive uplift.

All the major building societies barring Nationwide have passed on most if not all of the previous base rate rises to easy access savers.

Challenger banks, competing with one another at the top of the savings league tables have also kept the top deals ticking upwards.

Prior to the first base rate rise in December, the best paying easy access deal was with Investec paying 0.71 per cent, closely followed by Cynergy Bank paying 0.7 per cent.

Today, Cynergy Bank is paying 0.84 per cent, whilst 11 other providers are paying 0.7 per cent or more.

For those considering putting their money in a fixed rate savings deal, upwards movement has been more noticeable.

The average one year fixed rate has risen from 0.84 per cent to 0.97 per cent since 16 December, according to Moneyfacts.

Those keeping an eye on the savings best buy tables will have noticed some positive changes.

Prior to the December base rate rise, Gatehouse Bank was offering the best one-year deal paying 1.41 per cent, whilst Zopa Bank offered the best two-year deal paying 1.61 per cent.

Today, the best one-year deal has risen by 0.2 per cent, paying 1.61 per cent, whilst the best two-year deal has risen by 0.3 per cent, now paying 1.91 per cent.

So whilst a 0.25 per cent base rate rise is unlikely to send rates soaring, savers can expect to see more of the same over the coming weeks and months.

James Blower, founder of The Savings Guru said: ‘This will feed through to the savings market in a similar way as before – building societies will pass on a good chunk of this to savers, although I doubt Nationwide will.

‘Small banks competing with one another will nudge up best buy rates towards 0.9 per cent on easy access accounts.

‘Sadly I think we are a little way from a 1 per cent best buy, but I do think we will get to that point in the second half of 2022.’

Savers should seek out better deals

With the vast majority of savers seemingly unconcerned about whether their money is earning the best rate, the hope will be that as rates rise, people will become increasingly tempted to move their cash away from the big banks.

Nearly three quarters of the money in easy-access accounts earns a rate of 0.1 per cent or less, according to research by Paragon Bank

Furthermore, a huge £455billion is also sat in UK current accounts, with the typical balance of £5,600 generating an average interest rate of 0.06 per cent.

For savers fed up with a rock bottom rate, there is only one solution. Abandon ship and move your money elsewhere.

‘I can’t see the big clearing banks doing anything other than passing on the rate rise to mortgage borrowers in full and little or nothing to savers,’ said Blower.

‘It is imperative that savers with savings in these big banks switch to make the most of their money, rather than hope their bank will pass it on to them.’

Anna Bowes, co-founder of Savings Champion agreed with Blower.

‘Unfortunately savers can’t depend on their savings providers to pass these on if recent behaviour is anything to go by,’ she said. 

‘The good news is that there is still some competition among providers who are looking to attract new business by paying market leading rates, so it would be good to see rates climb back to levels seen before the pandemic at the very least.

‘So savers need to ditch those providers who are treating them badly and move their money into accounts paying the best rates.’ 

The average two year fixed rate deal has increased by 0.42 per cent since the first base rate rise in December, according to Moneyfacts

The average two year fixed rate deal has increased by 0.42 per cent since the first base rate rise in December, according to Moneyfacts

What does the rate rise mean for mortgage borrowers? 

The Bank of England’s decision will undoubtedly continue to drive up the cost of borrowing across the mortgage market.

Those on their lender’s standard variable rate, discount deals, or a base rate tracker mortgage are the only borrowers that will see their payments increase immediately.

They represents around 20 to 25 per cent of existing mortgage holders, depending on which estimate you look at.

Those with fixed rate deals will be protected for now, but will face the prospect of higher rates when they come to remortgage.

‘Mortgage rates are lower than they were before the financial crisis, but the rate they are rising at is quite dramatic 

Simon Gammon, Knight Frank Finance 

David Hollingworth, associate director at L&C Mortgages said: ‘Although lenders don’t necessarily have to lift their standard variable rate by any base rate rise, borrowers should assume that is likely and many of the main lenders have followed the last two base rate hikes.

‘With living costs climbing there’s still a great opportunity for borrowers to take control of their biggest outgoing and lock down their mortgage rate.

‘ I expect that fixed rates will only grow in popularity as borrowers look to protect against further rises, especially in light of rising costs that they can do little about.’  

Simon Gammon, managing partner at Knight Frank Finance, said that some borrowers who had fixed their mortgage on a two-year deal last year, could see the interest they pay more than double by the time they came to remortgage. 

‘Lenders don’t need much of an excuse to put their rates up,’ he said. ‘There will probably be another round of mortgage products being withdrawn from the market, and then replaced with ones on higher rates. 

Monthly rise in SVR mortgage costs following further base rate rises 
Mortgage amount BoE rise to 0.75 BoE rise to 1.00 BoE rise to 1.25   BoE rise to 1.50  
£150,000 £21  £42 £63  £85   
£200,000  £28  £56  £85  £113   
£300,000  £42  £84  £127  £170   
£450,000  £63  £126  £190  £255   
Based on repayment mortgage over 25 years showing payment increases based on a current SVR of 3.99% that lifts in line with Base Rate. Credit L&C Mortgages.          

‘Mortgage rates are lower than they were before the financial crisis, but the rate they are rising at is quite dramatic.

‘Six months ago, you could get a five-year fixed mortgage at around 1 per cent – now the best deal is just under 2 per cent.

‘If I was a first-time buyer and I’d bought my first home a year ago, and completely maxed out how much I could borrow, I could be looking at the interest I am paying now doubling in a year’s time.

‘It is a big jump. It will have much more of an impact on many people’s lives than, say, fuel costs going up.’

What has happened to mortgage rates so far? 

Fixed rate mortgages, however, are on the rise so borrowers may be wise to fix in as soon as they can. 

The average two year fixed rate deal has increased by 0.42 per cent since the first base rate rise in December, according to Moneyfacts, from 2.38 per cent to 2.8 per cent.

The average two-year deal for those requiring a mortgage covering 90 per cent of a property’s value has risen by 0.34 per cent from 2.55 per cent to 2.89 per cent during that time.

For equity rich homeowners the difference will be more noticeable. The average two-year deal for someone with 40 per cent equity or more in their property has risen by 0.55 per cent since 16 December, from 1.72 per cent to 2.27 per cent.

At the time of the first base rate rise on 16 December 2021, the cheapest two-year fixed rate deal for someone with either a 40 per cent deposit or equity was offered by Barclays paying 1.11 per cent with a £999 product fee.

As of today, the cheapest two year fixed rate deal for a mortgage covering 60 per cent of a property’s value is offered by Coventry paying 1.75 per cent with a £999 product fee.

This means someone with a 25-year £180,000 repayment mortgage on a £300,000 property eligible for the cheapest rate will be paying £741 a month today compared to £688 a month before the first base rate rise.

Interest Rate Rise / Fall Calculator

Work out how much extra or less you would pay on your mortgage if your lender changes the rate you are paying. Enter a negative value eg (-0.25) for a rate cut.

Those needing to remortgage this year are being advised to plan ahead and lock in a rate as soon as possible.

Those needing to remortgage this year are being advised to plan ahead and lock in a rate as soon as possible.

What should you do if you need to fix your mortgage? 

With further base rate rises expected as the Bank of England attempts to stem the inflationary surge, mortgage borrowers can expect mortgage rates to continue in an upward direction this year.

Those looking to buy over the coming months are being encouraged to lock in to longer fixed rate deals. You can check the best mortgage rates you could apply for and see monthly costs  with our L&C-powered calculator.

Longer term deals have on average seen less extreme rate hikes since the first base rate hike.

The average 5-year deal has increased by 0.31 per cent from 2.66 per cent to 2.97 per cent according to Moneyfacts. 

In fact, those prepared to lock in for up to 10 years will typically be able to secure a cheaper deal than they would back in December.

The average 10-year fixed rate has actually dropped from 2.97 per cent to 2.9 per cent.

Swen Nicolaus, chief capital officer at Molo said: ‘For people who are looking to buy a house and are worried about how inflation will impact mortgage rates, we’d recommend exploring longer term fixed rate mortgage options. 

‘While it’s difficult to predict when, where and how the impact of rising interest will set in for mortgage rates, a long term fixed rate can mitigate some of the risks and provide stability.’ 

Those needing to remortgage this year are being advised to plan ahead and lock in a rate as soon as possible.

Hollingworth said: ‘Anyone that is already in a fixed rate will have the benefit of being protected from the market movement and from the decisions around base rate. 

With some lender offers being valid for up to six months there is an opportunity for borrowers to start the process sooner than they think 

‘That’s a positive but it makes sense for them to consider how long that fixed rate lasts for so they can diarise an appropriate time to review. 

‘With some lender offers being valid for up to six months there is an opportunity for borrowers to start the process sooner than they think, which could prove beneficial if rates continue to push up. 

‘In any case it is generally advisable to start at least three months before the end of the current deal as it allows time to not only get the mortgage offer but for the legal work to be conducted allowing for a smooth switch across and avoiding a period of reverting to the lender’s standard variable rate.’ 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

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The 15 best and worst places to live in the UK to stay healthy, live a long life… and get a GP appointment, revealed by health and data experts. So is your town on the list?

It’s not just thriving high streets, affordable housing and being in the catchment area of a good school that sways many home buyers.

Living in a healthy area and having access to excellent hospitals with low waiting times for treatment and easily accessible GP appointments is another very strong consideration for house hunters.

Indeed, where you live can have a profound effect on your health and life expectancy. According to the charity The People’s Health Trust, women born in the most disadvantaged areas of Scotland, on average, live 25 fewer years in good health than those born in affluent areas, while men die 9.7 years earlier.

We’ve consulted health experts and analysed a range of surveys, university studies and data to reveal the best and worst places to live in the UK for access to good healthcare.

Where you live can have a profound effect on your health and life expectancy

Where you live can have a profound effect on your health and life expectancy

THE BEST

Leeds, Yorkshire

Three of this northern city’s nine hospitals are in the UK’s top 50, according to a recent study by Newsweek.

 The city, home to 455,000 people, has almost two hospitals per 100,000 people, as well as 1.32 sexual health clinics per 100,000. 

The Care Quality Commission (CQC), in its latest inspection, said Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust was ‘safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led’, and gave it an overall rating of ‘Good’, while sexual health services were rated ‘Outstanding’ overall.

Great Torrington, Devon

This market town in North Devon is the healthiest place to live in the UK (joint with Appleby-in-Westmorland, below), according to a Access To Healthy Assets And Hazards study by the University of Liverpool. 

It has low levels of pollution, access to parks and green space, few retail outlets that may encourage poor health-related behaviours and good access to health services. Both Torrington Hospital and Torrington Health Centre enjoy very good ratings overall.

Inner London

While inner London suffers from relatively high air pollution, lots of fast food joints and limited green space, this is offset by having, overwhelmingly, the best healthcare provision in the country. 

In Newsweek’s annual survey of the UK’s top 125 hospitals, St Thomas’ in Westminster came first, while five of the top eight were located in inner London. Conversely, just seven are in Scotland and one in Wales. 

A MailOnline analysis of NHS data in 2023 found that London was only beaten for ambulance response times by the Isle of Wight in the four categories of urgency for 11 regions of England.

Appleby-in-Westmorland, Cumbria

Nestled in the picturesque Eden Valley, this charming market town on the banks of the River Eden was considered to be the healthiest place to live in England by the Geographic Data Science Lab’s Access To Healthy Assets And Hazards data resource compilation. 

There’s plenty of evidence out there to confirm this: for example, the CQC has rated Appleby Medical Practice as ‘Good’ for some years, while 78 per cent of patients who arrived at A&E at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (which includes Westmorland General Hospital) last month were seen within four hours.

Edinburgh, Scotland

The Scottish capital came second in the NowPatient study of cities and towns offering the best healthcare.

It offers very accessible services, with 1.72 hospitals and 1.29 sexual health clinics per 100,000 people. Edinburgh also offers a quick turnaround, with all Scottish hospitals completing an 18-week standard waiting time from GP to treatment. 

The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh was rated as the 33rd best hospital in the UK by Newsweek.

South Tyneside, Tyne and Wear,

After a major and comprehensive inspection, the CQC rated South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust’s community-based health services as ‘Outstanding’, and acute hospital care as ‘Good’. 

It highlighted many areas of outstanding practice, including its end-of-life care services at St Benedict’s Hospice in Ryhope, and community sexual health services. 

The hospital provides state-of-the-art regional vascular services and laser imaging equipment, the first of its kind in the UK and one of only a few worldwide. 

The Trust’s waiting times for outpatient appointments were consistently better than the England average. 

The 2022 Healthcare Transformers study of the UK’s top healthcare hotspots found this county to be the third best place to live for healthcare in the country, with 97 per cent having confidence in their GPs.

Penarth and Barry, Vale of Glamorgan

Close to Cardiff in the Vale of Glamorgan, Penarth and Barry were considered to be great places to live on the basis of access to healthcare, according to a study by the University of Liverpool. 

With Penarth being just three miles from Cardiff, and Barry nine, they benefit from the Welsh capital’s healthcare provision, including the University Hospital Of Wales, which is considered the best hospital in Wales and came 42nd in Newsweek’s top UK hospitals.

THE WORST

St Davids, Pembrokeshire

Currently all aspects of healthcare are challenged in Britain’s smallest city. Its closest hospital, Withybush in Haverfordwest, recently closed several wards due to crumbling concrete, resulting in patients having to travel for 90 minutes to access care. 

Although they have reopened now, significant disruption due to continuing repair work continues. 

An independent inspection at Glangwili Hospital in Carmarthen, an hour away, uncovered overcrowding, with patients sleeping on the floor in A&E and not always receiving consistently safe care. 

Ambulance waiting times in the area are generally bad, and there’s currently a fight to save St Davids’ only GP surgery, which is due to close.

Southend-on-Sea, Essex

The resort town’s Southend University Hospital received a CQC rating of ‘Requires improvement’ in 2022, due to staff shortages and them not completing mandatory training, among other issues. 

In 2023, one in five people were on an NHS waiting list, the highest rate in the country, while Recent NHS figures revealed more than a third of A&E patients at Mid and South Essex hospitals were not seen within the four-hour target

Some 21 per cent of the city’s children are living in poverty, compared with 15 per cent in the rest of England. 

Between the most and least deprived wards, there is a life expectancy gap of nine years for men and ten for women. The town received one of the lowest scores for access to healthcare in NowPatient’s analysis of NHS, Allianz Worldwide Care and Newsweek data. 

There are just 0.34 hospitals per 100,000 people, compared to more than four per 100,000 in London and Manchester. It has poor sexual health coverage and waits for general surgery are high.

Newtown, Powys

Rural areas around the country often have bigger problems accessing healthcare. And Newtown, like Holyhead on Anglesey and Tonna in Neath Port Talbot, was seen by the University of Liverpool’s study to be an area of Wales where healthcare provision was not particularly good. 

Employment website Indeed has numerous highly critical reviews of working for Powys Teaching Health Board, with a former employee criticising its ‘dreadful management, old fashioned ways’, while another said ‘management is all over the place’.

Gloucester

If you want to see a GP in Gloucestershire, you’re likely to be in for a long wait. An analysis of NHS data by Claims.co.uk found that, out of England’s 42 integrated care boards, NHS Gloucestershire came out worst, with nearly 600,000 appointments, or 12 per cent, taking longer than 22 days from booking to consultation

Maternity units covered by NHS Gloucestershire are among 10 per cent of maternity units in England that were rated this year as ‘Inadequate’ for safety by the CQC

In January, the BBC’s Panorama revealed serious concerns about maternity services in Gloucestershire, with midwives saying that a poor work culture and staff shortages led to baby deaths that could have been avoided.

Thurrock, Essex

NHS Thurrock came second to last in the Healthcare Transformers study of the UK’s top healthcare hotspots. Just 60 per cent of people described the process of booking a GP appointment as ‘good’, and 72 per cent described their GP experience as ‘good’ or ‘very good’. 

Thurrock has only 4.22 GPs per 10,000 people. The NHS website has numerous woeful reviews for Thurrock Health Centre, and councillors at one Thurrock health and wellbeing board meeting heard patients were waiting for hours to get through to surgeries by phone, while a patient survey showed that Thurrock had the lowest overall experience rating in Mid and South Essex. 

Out of 7,905 patients ill enough to be admitted to three Mid and South Essex hospitals in February, 2,700 — almost a third — had to wait 12 hours or more from arrival to treatment.

Ashford and Margate, Kent

NHS Kent and Medway came third to last in the Healthcare Transformers study of the UK’s top healthcare hotspots. 

Just 66 per cent of people described the process of booking a GP appointment as ‘good’, and 80 per cent described their GP experience as ‘good’ or ‘very good’. There are just 4.71 GPs per 10,000 people. 

There have been a number of concerns about the standard of care offered at the Trust’s hospitals, including issues concerning security staff and adult safeguarding. In October 2022, an independent review into neighbouring East Kent NHS Hospitals Trust found that up to 45 babies who died may have survived had their received better care.

Bradford, West Yorkshire

This West Yorkshire city had just 0.33 hospitals and sexual health clinics per 100,000 people, and no hospitals in the area are on Newsweek’s top hospitals list. 

In 2022, it was revealed that 104 compensation claims totalling nearly £18 million were made to Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which covers Bradford Royal Infirmary and St Luke’s Hospital. 

More than £17 million was paid to patients and their families who had received insufficient care. 

A further £900,000 was paid out in compensation by Bradford District Care Trust, which is responsible for running community care, including dementia and mental health services.

Portsmouth, Hampshire

NHS Portsmouth came last in the Healthcare Transformers study of the UK’s top healthcare hotspots. 

Just 59 per cent of people described the process of booking a GP appointment as ‘good’, and 79 per cent described their GP experience as ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Portsmouth has 4.38 GPs per 10,000 people — while Northumberland, which came first in the rankings, has 6.95 GPs per 10,000.

Meanwhile, in March, a University of Portsmouth study called Healthwatch Portsmouth found that ‘accessing primary care and specialist services was difficult for Portsmouth residents, mental health services were often inaccessible and did not provide appropriate, ongoing care and dental care was not accessible for many’.

 

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Britain HAS become more anti-social! Complaints data shows huge spike in fines for serial noise polluters

The London borough of Southwark and North Lankarkshire in Scotland received the highest number of noise complaints last year, exclusive research for This is Money reveals. 

A Freedom of Information Act request by Churchill Home Insurance revealed local authorities received more than 203,000 complaints from residents about noisy neighbours in 2023. 

Fines for breached Noise Abatement Orders (NAOs) also surged by 56 per cent last year compared to the previous year.  

Noise complaints: Southwark and North Lankarkshire councils received the highest number of noise complaints last year, according to data

Noise complaints: Southwark and North Lankarkshire councils received the highest number of noise complaints last year, according to data

In Southwark, there were 10.069 noise complaints received by the local council in 2023, while in North Lankarkshire there were 9,099, Churchill Home Insurance said. 

Redbridge, Kensington and Chelsea and Birmingham councils had the third, fourth and fifth highest number of noise complaints received last year, the findings added. 

Nuisance noise from neighbours is an even bigger problem this year. 

In the first quarter of 2024, councils made 59 per cent more revenue from fines for breached NAOs than during the whole of last year. 

Despite persistent neighbourhood noise issues being endured by many, only 6 per cent of people support a move to Swiss-style ‘quiet hours’, according to the research. 

In many parts of Switzerland there are designated ‘quiet hours’ from 10pm to 6am. 

While Southwark and North Lankarkshire were the worst locations for noise complaints last year, Westminster, Falkirk and Wandsworth also made it to the ten worst locations for noise in 2023. 

Keep it down: Of the top 10 worst areas for noise complaints last year, half were London boroughs, Churchill Home Insurance said

Keep it down: Of the top 10 worst areas for noise complaints last year, half were London boroughs, Churchill Home Insurance said 

Of the top 10 worst areas for noise complaints last year, half were London boroughs, while Scotland made the top ten three times. 

The local authorities which issued the most fines for breaches of NAOs did not receive the highest number of complaints. 

Calderdale, Gateshead and Burnley accounted for over 50 per cent of all NAO fines issued last year, according to the research.

An NAO tells a person what they must do to stop making a noise nuisance, or face further legal action. 

Anyone who breaches an NRO can be fined up to £5,000. 

Sarah Khan, head of Churchill Home Insurance, told This is Money: ‘Too many people think they are above the law and intimidating neighbours with excess noise even when they have been banned from doing so previously.

‘High levels of noise can be extremely distressing, especially if people are trying to get young children to sleep and want windows open to avoid them getting too hot on a warm night.’

She added: ‘Some noise pollution is completely accidental, as the summer is a fantastic time to get outside and entertain and complete much needed garden maintenance. 

‘However, noise can travel incredibly far without people realising. 

‘Chatting to your neighbours, letting them know if there may be a special event that may be noisier or unusual or completing DIY during the day, can really help avoid issues arising.’

Most intrusive noise from neighbours 
Type of noise Percentage of people negatively affected
1. Frequent dog barking 51%
2. Having parties/entertaining  37% 
3. Using DIY equipment/power tools  33% 
4. Trampolining  24% 
5. Kids playing in the garden  21% 
6. Jet washing  19% 
7.  Other gardening like hedge trimming 14% 
8. Mowing the lawn   11% 
Churchill Home Insurance    

What sort of noise causes problems? 

Barking dogs, parties and entertaining and DIY tools are the the three biggest offenders on the noise nuisance front, Churchill Home Insurance said. 

More than half of people said barking dogs had had a ‘negative impact’ on them, compared to 37 per cent who said the same about nearby parties. 

One in seven adults have also been affected by neighbours using noisy DIY tools, according to the research. 

Trampolining, children playing in gardens, jet washing, gardening work like hedge trimming and mowing the lawn also made it to the list of the eight worst noise problems. 

Nearly a quarter of people said people on trampoline noise had had a negative impact on them, while 19 per cent had trouble with noise from people jet washing nearby.  

The majority of Britons think parties and entertaining should be wrapped up by 10pm on a weekday and 11pm on weekends. 

Meanwhile, most people think noisy jobs outside should stop at 8pm during the week and at weekends. 

Nightmare neighbour story? Get in touch: editor@thisismoney.co.uk 

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So why did a football-loving Scot put their £220,000 house full of football memorabilia and Saltire cushions up for sale? Maybe it’s because of what the neighbours have been up to next door!

House hunting hopefuls have been left in hysterics after a home packed out with Scottish football memorabilia was put on the market.

But it wasn’t their unique Tartan Army-themed décor that had viewers chuckling – it was the contrast with the neighbouring home.

You would most likely see the famed blue and white flags clashing against those of the English at football matches or in a scene of Braveheart. 

However, these neighbours have managed to hilariously illustrate the long-standing cross-border rivalry between the two nations with their homes.

The semi-detached three-bed, listed at £220,000 in Belgrave, Leicestershire, has been decked out in blue and white, the colours of Scotland’s Saltire flag.

House hunters have been left chuckling after spotting a proudly Scottish home next to a property drowned in English flags

House hunters have been left chuckling after spotting a proudly Scottish home next to a property drowned in English flags

The property up for sale next to home donning English flags is kitted out with Saltire cushions and Scottish football memorabilia (pictured)

The property up for sale next to home donning English flags is kitted out with Saltire cushions and Scottish football memorabilia (pictured)  

But the neighbouring owner’s are giving them a run for their money in the patriotism category, draping their property with English flags. 

Although not obvious, the Scottish home is decked out with a blue mat as well as a copious amount of football memorabilia and Saltire cushions.

Even in their white-walled study, a bright blue laptop as well as a blue documents folder can be spotted.

But the owner’s aren’t all about the Highlands, with subtle nods to English football teams in the home such as a large picture of Birmingham City FC’s logo.

Estate agents Taylor Cole described the property as ‘the most attractive semi-detached family home’ nestled in a ‘delightful cul-de-sac.

They added: ‘[The] home boasts spacious internal dimensions, offering a wealth of opportunities to create your perfect haven.

‘Stepping inside, you are greeted by a warm and welcoming reception hallway, complete with stairs leading to the first-floor landing.

The property also has a ‘cosy family lounge’ with a bright bay window, allowing natural light and warmth to spill into the home. 

‘Toward the rear of the home, an open-plan kitchen/diner provides a wonderful reception space, perfect for both entertaining and day-to-day functionality.’ they added.

‘The kitchen is well-equipped, and the dining area offers ample space for family meals and gatherings.’

Taking to Reddit, hundreds of people were quick to joke about the contrasting neighbours.

One jibbed: ‘Why am I moving? I don’t get on with the neighbours. Like, really don’t get on with them.”

The home has themes of white and blue running throughout the property packed with Scottish momentos

The home has themes of white and blue running throughout the property packed with Scottish momentos

When you step into the home you are immediately greeted by a bright blue welcome mat (pictured)

When you step into the home you are immediately greeted by a bright blue welcome mat (pictured)

Upstairs in the white office, the bright blue theme reminiscent of the Scottish flag can be seen in the laptop and document folder

Upstairs in the white office, the bright blue theme reminiscent of the Scottish flag can be seen in the laptop and document folder

However there is a nod to English football with a large Birmingham City FC logo mounted on the wall

However there is a nod to English football with a large Birmingham City FC logo mounted on the wall

Those online found the contrast between the two homes hilarious, with one suggesting the neighbours had a 'cross-border rivalry'

Those online found the contrast between the two homes hilarious, with one suggesting the neighbours had a ‘cross-border rivalry’

‘I love the audacity of the agent to not crop next door out of the thumbnail,’ a second penned.

A third added: ‘OMG. I was laughing straight off seeing the house covered in England flags, but when we got to the interior shots with the wee Scottish bun cushions I straight-up had a coughing fit.’

‘With those Saltire cushions, I’d suggest a bit of cross-border rivalry,’ one quipped.

A fifth joked: ‘Getting up on the roof to put a flag there is hardcore insanity.’

MailOnline has approached Taylor Cole Estate Agents for comment.

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