Connect with us

Global Affairs

TV Host Seth Meyers Spots Staffer Crawling on the Floor During Interview With Deb Haaland

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Viral

Get short URL

Deb Haaland became the first Native American woman to be confirmed as US Secretary of the Interior. Tapped by Biden on December 17, 2020, to hold the position, Haaland was confirmed on 15 March.

As US Interior Secretary Deb Haaland was speaking to TV host Seth Meyers for his “Late Night with Seth Meyers” show, some ‘sneakery’ was happening behind her back.

While Haaland was speaking about her experience as the first Native American woman on her post and her emotions whilwe Vice President Kamala Harris swore her in to office, her staffer could be seen crawling on the floor in an attempt not to disrupt the interview. Meyers, however, was quick to notice him.

“You have a staffer who fully crawled on the carpet behind you — and it is the greatest thing I have ever seen”, Meyers added with a grin, immediately adding: “Sir, we know you’re behind the desk.”

As Meyer’s was saying that, the man – who appears to be Haaland’s photographer – proceeded to hide behind the desk on his knees with a camera in his hands. He then exited the frame, leaving Meyers and Haaland giggling.

“Now, Secretary, be honest,”  Meyers went on. “Do you know who that man is and are those someone else’s glasses he’s wearing?”. Laughing, Haaland responded: “We don’t have people sort of sneaking around, so, yes, I know who that is.”

She then thanked Meyers for “making light of it”. The host argued that he should be thanking her, instead, for a potentially viral comedic moment that the photographer appeared to create for the show.

The “sneakery”, as Meyers put it later in his tweet, prompted some giggles online, with netizens suggesting that the awkward cameraman might soon discover himself memeficated.

​Apparently, they were not wrong.

​Others suggested ways Haaland could have made it funnier.

​Deb Haaland, the first Native American woman to hold the position of US Secretary of the Interior, was confirmed on 15 March.



Source link

Global Affairs

US official urges EU to speed up enlargement

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Gabriel Escobar, the US’ newly-appointed acting deputy secretary of state for South Central Europe, has urged Europe to speed up Western Balkans enlargement. “To return 20 years later and see that there hasn’t been much progress on that front was a little disappointing,” he told the RFE/RL news agency Friday, referring to his last post in Europe in 2001. “We would like to see a more rapid integration,” he said.

Source link

Continue Reading

Global Affairs

Climate crisis leaving ‘millions at risk of trafficking and slavery’ | Global development

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Millions of people forced to leave their homes because of severe drought and powerful cyclones are at risk of modern slavery and human trafficking over the coming decades, a new report warns.

The climate crisis and the increasing frequency of extreme weather disasters including floods, droughts and megafires are having a devastating effect on the livelihoods of people already living in poverty and making them more vulnerable to slavery, according to the report, published today.

Researchers from the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and Anti-Slavery International found that drought in northern Ghana had led young men and women to migrate to major cities. Many women begin working as porters and are at risk of trafficking, sexual exploitation and debt bondage – a form of modern slavery in which workers are trapped in work and exploited to pay off a huge debt.

Boys at lathes turning aluminium pots
Children working in an aluminium pot factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Up to 85 million children work in hazardous jobs around the world. Photograph: NurPhoto/Getty

One woman, who migrated to Accra from northern Ghana, used to farm until the land was ruined by flooding and she was forced to move. For seven years she has worked as a porter (kayayie), carrying items on her head.

She said: “Working as a kayayie has not been easy for me. When I came here, I did not know anything about the work. I was told that the woman providing our pans will also feed us and give us accommodation. However, all my earnings go to her and only sometimes will she give me a small part of the money I’ve earned.”

She dropped a customer’s items once and had to pay for the damage, which she could not afford. The woman in charge paid up on condition that she repay her. She added: “I have been working endlessly and have not been able to repay.”

A woman from Bangladesh
A woman from the Sundarbans in Bangladesh, who moved to Kolkata after a cyclone to support her family. Now she cannot return to home without her employer’s permission. Photograph: Somnath Hazra

In the Sundarbans, on the border between India and Bangladesh, severe cyclones have caused flooding in the delta, reducing the land available for farming. With countries in the region tightening immigration restrictions, researchers found that smugglers and traffickers operating in the disaster-prone region were targeting widows and men desperate to cross the border to India to find employment and income. Trafficking victims were often forced into hard labour and prostitution, with some working in sweatshops along the border.

Fran Witt, a climate change and modern slavery adviser at Anti-Slavery International, said: “Our research shows the domino effect of climate change on millions of people’s lives. Extreme weather events contribute to environmental destruction, forcing people to leave their homes and leaving them vulnerable to trafficking, exploitation and slavery.”

The World Bank estimates that, by 2050, the impact of the climate crisis, such as poor crop yields, a lack of water and rising sea levels, will force more than 216 million people across six regions, including sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia and Latin America, from their homes.

The report is a stark warning to world leaders in advance of the Cop26 UN climate summit in Glasgow in November and calls on them to make sure efforts to address the climate emergency also tackle modern slavery. The report says labour and migrant rights abuses are disregardedin the interests of rapid economic growth and development.

Ritu Bharadwaj, a researcher for the IIED, said: “The world cannot continue to turn a blind eye to the forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking that’s being fuelled by climate change. Addressing these issues needs to be part and parcel of global plans to tackle climate change.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Global Affairs

Putin faces test of popularity in Russian election

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Russians head to the polls on Friday for parliamentary elections in a test of authority for president Vladimir Putin, whose United Russia party is polling at a near-historic low of just 30 percent. There are few legitimate international observers, after the ODIHR, a Warsaw-based European monitoring body, declined to go because authorities refused to give them proper access. But some pro-Russian MEPs, such as France’s Thierry Mariani, are going anyway.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!