Connect with us

Current

The homes competing to be RIBA’s House of the Year

Voice Of EU

Published

on

From a black timber-clad eco-pad to a former parchment factory: The homes competing to win RIBA’s House of the Year and star on Grand Designs

  • Modern homes are competing to be named Britain’s House of the Year
  • Twenty properties have made the Royal Institute of British Architects’ long list
  • A special series of Grand Designs later this year will announce the winner

A black timber-clad eco-home inspired by the designs of Scottish architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh and a remodelled house from the ruins of a 17th century parchment factory and old cattle shed are competing to be named Britain’s House of the Year.

The properties are among the 20 contemporary builds that have made the Royal Institute of British Architects’ long list.

A special series of Grand Designs later this year will announce the shortlist and eventual winner of the RIBA House of the Year 2022.

A special series of Grand Designs later this year will announce the shortlist and eventual winner of the RIBA House of the Year 2022 (scroll down for more details of house pictured)

A special series of Grand Designs later this year will announce the shortlist and eventual winner of the RIBA House of the Year 2022 (scroll down for more details of house pictured)

RIBA’s Simon Allford, said: ‘These architects’ visions push boundaries to realise the dreams of their clients.

‘Through expert design and technologies, they delightfully interpret complex briefs that vary from the near-impossible to the truly extraordinary.

‘They stand testament to the benefits of engaged collaboration. I look forward to seeing each in more detail during this year’s series of Grand Designs: House of the Year.’

Here, we take a look at the some of the properties features in the RIBA longlist.

Ostro Passivhaus

This striking black timber-clad eco-home is in Scotland's rural setting of Stirlingshire

This striking black timber-clad eco-home is in Scotland’s rural setting of Stirlingshire

The house was inspired by the designs of Scottish architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh

The house was inspired by the designs of Scottish architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh

This striking black timber-clad eco-home was inspired by the designs of revered Scottish architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh in rural Stirlingshire.

The Parchment Works

This remodelled house rises from the ruins of a 17th Century parchment factory and old cattle shed

This remodelled house rises from the ruins of a 17th Century parchment factory and old cattle shed

The property is in Northampton and combines exposed brickwork and modern fittings in the interior

The property is in Northampton and combines exposed brickwork and modern fittings in the interior

This remodelled house rises from the ruins of a 17th Century parchment factory and old cattle shed in Northampton.

Leyton House

This four-storey townhouse was added to the end of a 1960's terrace in Waltham Forest, North East London.

This four-storey townhouse was added to the end of a 1960’s terrace in Waltham Forest, North East London.

The interior has a light and airy feel, and is flooded with plenty of sunlight from outdoors

The interior has a light and airy feel, and is flooded with plenty of sunlight from outdoors

This four-storey townhouse was added to the end of a 1960’s terrace, in Waltham Forest, North East London.

Derwent Valley Villa

Another property in the shortlist is this playful red-brick family home is nestled in Derbyshire's suburbs

Another property in the shortlist is this playful red-brick family home is nestled in Derbyshire’s suburbs

One side of the living room has a wall of windows that stretch from the floor to the ceiling

One side of the living room has a wall of windows that stretch from the floor to the ceiling

This playful red-brick family home is nestled in Derbyshire’s suburbs.

The long list for RIBA House of the Year 2022

The 20 longlisted homes are:

· Derwent Valley Villa (Derbyshire) by Blee Halligan

· House at Lough Beg (Northern Ireland) by McGonigle McGrath

· Leyton House (London) by McMahon Architecture Ltd

· Mere House (Cambridgeshire) by Mole Architects

· Mews House Deep Retrofit (London) by Prewett Bizley Architects

· Mountain View (London) by CAN

· Norfolk Barn (Norfolk) by 31/44 Architects and Taylor Made Space

· Ostro Passivhaus (Scotland) by Paper Igloo

· Peeking house (London) by Fletcher Crane Architects

· Ravine House (Derbyshire) by Chiles Evans + Care Architects Ltd

· Seabreeze (East Sussex) by RX Architects

· Suffolk Cottage (Suffolk) by Haysom Ward Miller Architects

· Surbiton Springs (London) by Surman Weston

· The Cowshed (Dorset) by Crawshaw Architects LLP

· The Den (Scotland) by Technique Architecture and Design in collaboration with Stallan-Brand

· The Dutch Barn (West Sussex) by Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd

· The Garden Studio (Norfolk) by Brisco Loran and James Alder Architect

· The Library House (London) by Macdonald Wright Architects

· The Parchment Works (Suffolk) by Will Gamble Architects

· The Red House (Dorset) by David Kohn Architects

Advertisement



Source link

Current

Author with immaculate house offers ten tips for a clean home

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Is this the secret to NEVER having to clean? Houseproud author claims she saves hours by sticking to a ten-step mantra – including banning chairs in bedrooms, wiping as you cook and only ironing shirts and dresses

  • UK writer Natali Juste Simmonds says she’s cracked keeping a home clean, by sticking to a few simple ground rules – and making sure family members comply
  • She shared top ten tips for keeping a home spotless with her 20,000 followers
  • Among them are ditching a toilet brush in the bathroom, not having a chair in the bedroom and cleaning  the kitchen while you cook

A houseproud author has revealed her ten essential tips for keeping a house spotless – saying simple ground rules for family members and cleaning as you go means never wasting time on dull chores. 

Writer Natali Juste Simmonds, who was born in the UK but now lives in the Netherlands, penned her top ways to keep on top of cleaning on Twitter, saying she has time to focus on her writing because she follows her own advice about dodging ‘thankless’ cleaning tasks. 

The author of a series of paranormal romance novels told her 20,000 followers on Twitter: ‘I know so many people who spend hours cleaning up after their family every day, but I refuse to. 

Scroll down for video 

UK writer Natali Juste Simmonds says she's cracked keeping a home clean, by sticking to a few simple ground rules - and making sure family members comply

UK writer Natali Juste Simmonds says she’s cracked keeping a home clean, by sticking to a few simple ground rules – and making sure family members comply

‘It’s boring and thankless. I prefer to write. Yet my house is spotless. Here are 10 ways to keep on top of s*** so you don’t have to clean for hours.’ 

Sharing her ‘tough love’ mantra, she said that the key to keeping a home clean is making sure every family member is engaged, saying learning how to tidy is a lifeskill that everyone needs – and no-one should get away with not doing it. 

Natali wrote: ‘Train everyone in the house to do the following (cats are the exception). After a while these habits will become routine, but you MUST stick to them and make sure no one is let off the hook.’ 

Among the tips are filling a bag with things that are in the wrong place at the end of every day and placing them back where they belong. 

Tidy home, tidy mind: The Netherlands-based writer shared her top ten tips for keeping a home spotless with her 20,000 followers on Twitter - saying that making sure everyone in the house pulls their weight is key (Pictured: An office area in Simmonds' home)

Tidy home, tidy mind: The Netherlands-based writer shared her top ten tips for keeping a home spotless with her 20,000 followers on Twitter – saying that making sure everyone in the house pulls their weight is key (Pictured: An office area in Simmonds’ home)

The writer also claims having a toilet brush doesn’t help keep a loo clean and dousing it with bleach instead is a more reliable way to ensure it’s sparkling. 

And getting used to wiping down mirrors after using a sink also helps, she claims, writing: ‘Keep a dry cloth next to the bathroom sink. Every time someone uses the taps or brushes their teeth, wipe down the counter and mirror. Takes literally 2 seconds. No cleaning toothpaste stains off counters.’

Teaching kids to pull their weight around the house is key to success, and equality reigns supreme in the Simmonds house. 

Among her top tips are ditching a toilet brush in the bathroom - using just bleach instead; not having a chair in the bedroom - to prevent people leaving clothes on them - and cleaning the kitchen while you cook (Pictured: Simmonds' very tidy office)

Among her top tips are ditching a toilet brush in the bathroom – using just bleach instead; not having a chair in the bedroom – to prevent people leaving clothes on them – and cleaning the kitchen while you cook (Pictured: Simmonds’ very tidy office)

‘If one kid lays the table, the other clears. If one hangs out the washing, the other collects. I don’t say “I need help with dinner” I say “who will chop the veg and who will wash up?” Its called a presumed close. I have no option, why should others in my house?’

The author, who has written books including the Indigo Chronicles trilogy and the Blood Web series, admits that having a cleaner is still useful…because they can help keep on top of areas where grime quickly builds, including fridges and ovens – but she suggests ditching a takeaway a week to cover the cost. 

Advertisement

Source link

Continue Reading

Current

DIA Group closes 25 Minipreco stores in Portugal

Voice Of EU

Published

on

DIA Group has closed 25 Minipreco stores in Portugal, resulting in the loss of approximately 159 jobs. The retailer said the closures are the result of ‘the effort to adapt, modernise and balance the operations of DIA Portugal, with the aim of better preparing the company for current and future challenges arising from the current economic situation in the country,’ according to media reports. In the last two years, the multinational company operating in Spain, Portugal, Brazil, and Argentina, accumulated losses of over €620m.

 

In Portugal, net sales reached €283.1m in the first half, 4.5% below the €296.3m generated in the same period last year, due to the reduction of stores and mobility restrictions. DIA Group confirmed its intention to continue to invest in Portugal. The company hopes to adjust its operation to the current reality in order to ensure the future success of the company.

Source link

Continue Reading

Current

Clifftop mansion once owned by holiday camp king Billy Butlin hits the market for £2.7million

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Billy Butlin's (pictured) holiday empire was sold to an American company in 1972 for £40million

Billy Butlin’s (pictured) holiday empire was sold to an American company in 1972 for £40million

Billy Butlin, a Canadian born in 1899 in South Africa, first had the idea for his holiday camps between the wars. 

He noticed that in Britain it always rained, and yet families were locked out of their dismal boarding houses during the day and had absolutely nothing to do. 

‘Everyone has a right to leisure’, he insisted, not only the idle rich, who anyway could always escape the downpours by travelling abroad.

With a fortune made from being the exclusive European agent for the newly invented funfair dodgems, Billy invested £18 million (in today’s money) in a 48-acre camp site in Skegness. 

The resort opened in 1936, and the season was fully booked — just as well, as Billy had purchased 16,000 pairs of roller skates. 

Advertisements promised ‘the diversions of the wealthy man’s vacation at a price within reach of the ordinary individual’s purse’ — and Billy aimed his all-inclusive package holidays at clerical workers, shop assistants, factory under-managers and, had he but known it, freelance literary journalists of modest means. 

A contemporary brochure announced that, ‘You can just quietly sit on your own veranda smoking your evening pipe’.  

What distinguished Butlin’s was the sense of community created by Bathing Belle pageants, Knobbly Knees contests, and prizes for the Loudest Snorer, Shiniest Bald Head and Bonniest Baby. Having made the final of the Glamorous Grandmother competition no fewer than 23 times, 76-year-old Alice Matthews ‘became a local celebrity in her home town of Leeds’.

Merriment was maintained by the famous Redcoats, in their smart jackets and white flannels. 

The Redcoats, among whom were numbered Roy Hudd, Des O’Connor and Dave Allen, though not Frankie Howerd who was advised by Billy to ‘find a different job’, also shifted pianos and marked out football pitches.

Iconic: The Butlins camp in Bognor Regis, West Sussex

Iconic: The Butlins camp in Bognor Regis, West Sussex 

The success of Skegness led, in 1938, to a resort at Clacton, which boasted vast heated pools and cascades.

The camps were requisitioned during the war to become Pioneer Corps training depots. A sign went up: ‘Will re-open when finished with Hitler.’ Pwllheli was developed by the Admiralty following the evacuation of Dunkirk. Altogether 250,000 men trained at Butlin’s, and the armed forces saved a mint not having to construct their own barracks.

The holiday trade resumed in 1947, but the North Welsh were sceptical about Pwllheli. They thought ‘people who go to holiday camps will drop orange peel and play the ukulele all over quiet mountains’.

When Billy wanted to open a camp at Mosney, near Dublin, the Catholic clergy complained, denouncing Butlin’s as ‘alien and undesirable’.

The postwar period was perhaps Butlin’s heyday. 

Resorts uniquely provided ramps for disabled ex-servicemen and the civilians injured in bombing raids. The chalets were popular with newly-weds and courting couples, who could at last get away from living on top of their parents. Honeymooners were given an alarm clock as a wedding present. Billy was personally invited to around 200 weddings a year. A telegram was always sent instead.

By 1948, 200,000 families were failing to get a booking, so six further camps were opened, and there were nine by 1960, including those at Bognor, Barry Island, Ayr and Minehead, which was built on 165 acres of marsh. The plan was that there’d be a Butlin’s camp within a hundred miles of ‘every major urban centre’.

The entertainment was always lavish. Gracie Fields drew a crowd of 10,000 fans when she performed at Skegness. 

Laurel and Hardy in person judged a beauty pageant. Ringo Starr did two seasons at Pwllheli, where he was visited by Lennon and McCartney. ‘He went straight from Butlin’s to the Beatles.’ Julie Andrews, when aged 13, ‘brought the house down’ at Clacton, and in 1979, Catherine Zeta-Jones ‘was a finalist in the Junior Star Trail’. 

The Queen visited Pwllheli in 1963, and Billy was knighted the following year. In 1965, however, bookings fell. People now owned cars and could take the ferry to the Continent, where there were duvets, bidets and garlic. 

By 1972 and the beginning of cheap air package tours to the Balearics, Butlin’s was sold off to the Rank Organisation. Sir Billy retired to Jersey. He died in 1980 and ‘his holiday empire was gradually dismantled’.

In 2000, Bourne Leisure purchased the business and saw that ‘short breaks were the key to attracting middle-income visitors’.

Skegness, Bognor and Minehead had ‘a major facelift’, and consultations were held with Mumsnet to see what modern families wanted. The Redcoats’ red coats were re-designed by Zandra Rhodes and Jeff Banks.

Butlin’s is now the antidote to airport security checks and frustrations. Sir Billy’s original motto was Shakespearean: ‘Our true intent is all for your delight.’

  • By Roger Lewis for the Daily Mail. Taken from THE NATION’S HOST by Kathryn Ferry (Viking £20)

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!