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The happiest time of my life… by Sarah McInerney, John Boyne, Marian Keyes and more

From long walks on the beach to waking up on match day, here are some people’s happiest memories

Sharing happy memories may seem glib in a time of war and sorrow, but it is also the time when many of us feel the need to reach for the warmth and joy of the past, those moments when the world seemed a little less ugly. On the eve of World Happiness Day, we asked a range of people to share their happiest memories (they were not allowed to mention babies or weddings). Here is what they said…

Paul Howard, author

Author Paul Howard. Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill
Author Paul Howard. Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill

I got thrown out of the Gaeltacht when I was 13 for speaking English. I did not speak Irish at the time because I had been in England until the age of 9. You got kicked out if you spoke Irish more than twice and it was a miracle I lasted two weeks. One day I was at the table in the bean an tí’s house and I asked someone “could you pass the bread”. An older boy called Fionnan grassed me up. I was shaken awake at 7am the next day and told “tá tú ag dul abhaile”. I was put in a car and driven from Muirioch on the Dingle Peninsula to Tralee. I was sitting in the back of this gaelgeoir’s car, a tough, unsmiling woman who apparently loved Irish so much she did not have a word of consolation for the kid crying his eyes out in the back seat of her car. I cried all the whole way to the train station. We did not have a phone in the house, so I had no way of knowing how my mother and father were feeling about what had happened – they’d spent a lot of money to send me there. Just before I got on the train, the woman who had driven me said: “Your dad left a message, he said to tell you not to worry, they love you very much and they are really looking forward to having you home.” Ever since, I have measured all my happiness against how I felt in that moment.

Ivana Bacik, Labour TD

Labour TD Ivana Bacik. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw
Labour TD Ivana Bacik. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

The happiest times for me are the times when I am swimming in the sea – anywhere in the world, at any time of the year, but in particular every week when I experience immense joy in stepping or jumping off the ladder at the Half Moon club on the South Wall in Poolbeg, Dublin, immersing myself in the clear cold water and floating with my toes in the air, ideally while basking in the sunshine. Pure Bliss!

Jennifer O’Connell, journalist

Lots of words have been written about how an icy dip in the salty grey sea is the key to happiness – most of them by newly-minted DryRobe owners. But for me, avoiding the dip is the point. My happiest hours are those spent alone on the water in my Laser 4.7 dinghy, when nothing exists in the world but the relationship between wind and sail, waves and keel. I rediscovered sailing in my 40s, and could not care less about the races I will not win or how ridiculous I look in my wetsuit. I am too busy feeling alive.

John Boyne, author

Author John Boyne. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw
Author John Boyne. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

In July 1996 I began the only full-time job I would ever hold, at Waterstone’s Bookshop on Dawson Street. Twenty-five, just graduated from UEA Norwich, and flat broke, I was hired by Anne Griffin, who would go on to be a bestselling novelist in her own right. She often recalls the dashing young man who arrived for the interview in a red sports jacket and carrying a briefcase. I guess they worked, because I got the job. I spent seven years there but the first was the best. I loved working with books and interacting with customers. The staff were young, and many had ambitions in the arts. I woke every morning at 5am to write for two hours and was convinced, through a mixture of arrogance and self-belief, that I was destined to become a great writer. The days were fun, the nights in the Duke were epic, and I snogged, or tried to snog, every unfortunate boy who crossed my path. I do not think I’ve ever been as happy.

Joanne O’Riordan, sports columnist

Joanne O’Riordan, sports columnist. Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill
Joanne O’Riordan, sports columnist. Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill

When I wake up every morning on the weekend, I have a huge smile on my face because I know what day it is – it is game day. Game day is not just about the designated few hours standing on a pitch, letting 30 people dictate your mood for the rest of the week. Game day is about camaraderie, friendships, the socialising along the way. Every game day is different. Every day I meet someone new, hear different stories, and every experience is extraordinary. Game day is a metaphor for how everyone’s week has gone. If you’re frustrated, let it out. If you’re happy, sit with a smile on your face. More importantly, it’s a metaphor for how your upcoming week will go. Because like the athletes, you must leave it all out there, except for hope and the ability to do your best. Happiness to me is game day.

Marian Keyes, author

Author Marian Keyes. Photograph: Dean Chalkley
Author Marian Keyes. Photograph: Dean Chalkley

I remember being really happy on Easter Sunday 2021. It was my brother Niall’s birthday, some restrictions had eased, and the whole family were gathered in my back garden to celebrate. My mother was there, and that was made more special by the fact that she had not been touched, or barely even seen, by us over those brutal months of the third lockdown. And while we knew The Awfulness was far from over, that day was joyous with nieces and nephews everywhere; we had an Easter egg hunt and at one point my little niece Hannah decided to go for a swim in the water feature. We siblings were all sort of healing from my dad’s death and had come to that point where we could talk about him easily. I just remember the utter delight of saying “feck this” and hugging each other and eating sweets and pizza and birthday cake and not wearing masks. Even the weather played ball. My mother, who doesn’t have much stamina, sat outside in the sunshine for hours. I just remember feeling so grateful and yes, completely happy.

Patrick Freyne, journalist and author

One of the times I was happiest was when I was struggling as a freelance journalist, and I won an award. Some people say that awards are not important and that it is the taking part that counts. Frankly that is loser talk from people who do not have an award. My wife Anna noted that though I was happy for the few days after I won the award, I quickly returned to my usual sulky self a few days later. She suggested that I would probably be happy if she made a big deal of presenting me with the award every morning at breakfast, possibly with a speech. I thought this was a great idea. It turns out she was “joking”.

Kit de Waal, author

Author Kit de Waal. Photograph: Justine Stoddart
Author Kit de Waal. Photograph: Justine Stoddart

I was standing by the shore near the sand dunes in Kilmore quay in Wexford. I had been really struggling with a character and a scene in my second novel and all of a sudden with the waves over my feet and the blue horizon stretching ahead of me I understood what happened next in the book. I felt like all the pieces of me came together, me as a writer, me as a lover of the sea, me as an Irish woman and just for a brief moment, I felt totally happy and at peace.

Senator Lynn Ruane

I have been happiest each and every morning when sat in an open top landrover, with the sun rising in Mozambique. A handmade poncho over me, holding a hot chocolate in a tin cup. Waiting to see if the day would bring lions or leopards. The stillness. The sounds. The skies. And sometimes the wild would unfold in front me in a way that meant I felt part of something bigger.

Simon Harris, Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science

Minister for Higher Education Simon Harris. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA Wire
Minister for Higher Education Simon Harris. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

I am probably at my happiest when I am on a long walk on the beach or in the woods with my family. But if I was to choose a time I was happiest – excluding all the important family occasions and milestones in life – I am thinking back to growing up in Greystones and the carefree summer holidays. Football mini-league, Greystones Summer Project, community fun days: such simple happy times where we all came together, had the craic and enjoyed hanging out. Things we probably took for granted at the time but things that helped shape and mould us as all we grew up and created happy memories and friendships that stay with you for life.

Zainab Boladale, journalist and presenter

Zainab Boladale, journalist and presenter
Zainab Boladale, journalist and presenter

My “most happiest” moment so far has to have been on holiday in Cyprus with my best friend, in September. It was our first sun holiday in two years, so naturally we were excited. I have a huge fear of heights which I wanted to challenge, so I did something I had never done before, which was to jump from the side of a large boat into the sea. Being able to conquer that fear before my 25th birthday felt like an amazing achievement, and every time I think about that moment, it brings a smile to my face.

Kathleen MacMahon, author

I am generally at my happiest sitting in my kitchen on an ordinary Saturday morning. My family are asleep upstairs – when they appear there will be eggs and newspapers, and plans will be made for the day ahead – but for now it is me and the dog and the radio and a cup of coffee. I like to sit in the wash of sunlight from the window, surrounded by the peace of my own house. It is terrible to think how many people in Ukraine have lost that.

David McCullagh, journalist and presenter

It may sound too good to be true, but I’m happiest right now. Everyone close to me is healthy. I spend time with those I love. Now that socialising is allowed again I can see family and friends on a regular basis. My job is interesting and varied. I am starting to crack this work-life balance thing. My dog takes me for walks to keep me exercised. I am reading a good book. All it would take to make my happiness complete would be a Springsteen concert.

Rosita Boland, journalist

I ran up the gangway of the ship, joy propelling me forwards, fuelled by expectations, and a state of the purest of happiness. It was November 2007 and I was in Ushuaia in Argentina, several weeks into a backpacking trip around South America. The previous day I had bought a reduced-price ticket for a 10-day expedition to Antarctica. This ship was going to bring me to a place defined by ice, that I knew I would never again see in all my life. I had never been more ecstatic. As the Antarctic Dream pulled out of harbour, I could see these words, in Spanish and English, painted metres high on the harbour walls. Ushuaia. End of the world. Beginning of everything.

Ellen Keane, Paralympic swimmer and gold medal winner

There have been the big moments in my competitive Paralympic swimming career that have brought me real joy and a sense of accomplishment, but I am at my happiest enjoying the simple everyday moments like chilling on the couch with my boyfriend Gav and Denny our dog, after a busy day. That is when my heart feels most full of happiness.

Fintan O’Toole, author and journalist

Journalist and author Fintan O’Toole. Photograph: Barry Cronin
Journalist and author Fintan O’Toole. Photograph: Barry Cronin

If you leave out births, marriages and first kisses, the only thing that remains for anyone who writes is the thrill of seeing your name in print and knowing you’re getting paid. It was just a piece in In Dublin magazine about the 1979 local elections, and the money, as I recall, was about enough for five pints of Guinness. But it still felt like a great trick to pull off – getting someone to give you money for doing something you would do for free. It still does – but do not tell the Irish Times that.

Sarah McInerney, presenter of Prime Time and Drivetime on RTÉ Radio 1

Sarah McInerney, RTÉ radio and television presenter. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill
Sarah McInerney, RTÉ radio and television presenter. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

On a tiny island in the Gulf of Thailand, there is a little dive resort that serves bad food, warm beer and has few modern conveniences. It is the best place on earth. Happiness, there, is delivered in the silence. It is in not wearing shoes for 10 days, in a secret spot on earth that can only be reached by boat. It is in diving in the clearest waters around a frantic, kaleidoscopic underwater city. It is in knowing that, though it will all be over soon, you will have the memories, tucked safely way, for when you need them.

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Culture

Top 10 Urban Property Hotspots

Bradford And Blackpool Lead The Pack

Bradford is the top urban property hotspot for the second consecutive quarter, exclusive data from OnTheMarket reveals.

A combination of affordable house prices and growing number of buyers being priced out of nearby Leeds is helping lift Bradford’s property market, OnTheMarket said.

Speaking to This is Money, Robert McCarthy, manager of Hunters estate agency in Bradford, said buyers were attracted to the area because properties are ‘dirt cheap.’

Hotspots: Bradford is the top urban property hotspot for the second consecutive quarter, data reveals
Hotspots: Bradford is the top urban property hotspot for the second consecutive quarter, data reveals

He said: ‘Bradford is seeing a high increase in first time buyers and investors, with properties ranging from around £70,000 for a two bedroomed terrace, £110,000-£130,000 for a three to four bedroom terrace and £120,000 to £240,000 for a three bedroom semi-detached or detached property.

‘This gives a buyer much more for their money, while keeping the mortgage payments lower.’

He added: ‘This week we had a three bedroom semi-detached property go on the market needing some work at £100,000.

‘We we had over 90 requests to view, with some buyers offering before a viewing at well over the asking price.

‘I personally bought a three bedroom semi-detached renovation project in the area with a large garden for £51,000 a few years ago.

‘Now fully renovated, if I was selling to put it on the market it would be around £180,000 to £190,000.’

Mr McCarthy told This is Money that it was possible to buy a one or two bedroom flat in the centre of Bradford for between £20,000 to £60,000.

Urban property hotspots

Blackpool, Rochdale and Plymouth came in second, third and fourth place respectively in OnTheMarket’s latest rankings, with Rochdale climbing from 23rd to third place.

As cities like Manchester become increasingly expensive, Rochdale has ballooned in popularity with buyers.

Andrew Cardwell, manging director of Cardwells Estate Agents, said he wasn’t surprised about Rochdale’s colossal climb in the rankings.

Ample space: The property in Bradford is link detached and perfect for families
Ample space: The property in Bradford is link detached and perfect for families
Time to eat: The dining room in this Bradford property is chic and modern

Time to eat: The dining room in this Bradford property is chic and modern

Outdoor space: the property has a low maintenance garden perfect for entertaining
Outdoor space: the property has a low maintenance garden perfect for entertaining

He said: ‘Earlier this year Rochdale was recognised as one of the most affordable places to buy a property, with an average house price of around £206,000.

‘As well as offering excellent value for money, it’s within easy reach of Manchester city centre and has beautiful countryside.’

Plymouth jumped from 22nd to fourth place in the rankings. It is the only southern location to make it to the top five, OnTheMarket said.

Plymouth is home to HMNB Devonport, the largest naval base in western Europe and the city is brimming with shops and restaurants.

Jacob Tebb, president of OnTheMarket, told This is Money: ‘Property buying decisions continue to be heavily influenced by affordability, according to our latest hotspots index, which reveals that some of the most active or “hottest” areas also offer buyers the best value.”

He added: ‘Overall, the north/south divide is holding firm, with some of the most vibrant and cheapest locations in the north seeing the most heat in terms of housing market activity and only one southern location making it into the top ten.’

Leicester, Stoke-on-Trent, Swindon, Sunderland, Wakefield and Derby also made it to the top ten, while Middlesborough, Burnley and Coventry were just outside the top 10.

Wakefield rose from thirtieth to ninth place, while Birmingham climbed from forty-third to twenty-third place.

Where is the market cooling? Urban property hotspots

OnTheMarket added: ‘Moving in the other direction, demand in Wigan cooled significantly, dropping from second to fifteenth place in our rankings, while Liverpool has fallen from eleventh place in the first quarter to thirtieth.

‘Worthing, one of the few southern locations to be considered a hotspot, fell from twentieth to fifty-third place. The “coolest” hotspot on our list is Brighton.’

The average price of a house in Brighton and Hove was £422,000 in April, according to the Office for National Statistics. Its coastal location and proximity to London makes it popular but expensive with buyers.

Activity in Gloucester, Norwich and Warrington is also cooling, OnTheMarket said.

How is the London property market faring?

OnTheMarket crunched separate data for the London property market. The data suggested there has been ‘less fluctuation nationally and very little movement’, On The Market said.

Within the London-focused rankings, Barking and Dagenham, Havering, Sutton, Redbridge and Newham comprised the top five, followed by Bexley, Hillingdon and Enfield. Hounslow and Croydon also made it to the top 10.

However, Hounslow dropped out of the top five London hotspots in the quarter, while Lambeth, Southwark and Merton all fell four places.

In the last few years, higher mortgage rates have put a dampener on the property market. However, the Bank of England is expected to cut interest rates this summer and some banks and building societies have already started trimming rates on their mortgage deals.

Barclays recently upped the ante in the mortgage price war currently playing out between banks and building societies.

The mortgage lender cut rates by up to 0.33 percentage points across a wide range of deals for both homebuyers and those remortgaging, resulting in several new best-buys.

Halifax also announced it was cutting mortgage rates by up to 0.13 percentage points on selected deals.

What’s on sale now?

1. Three-bed semi-detached house, Bradford, £190,000

This three-bedroom semi-detached house at Hopefield Way, Bierley in Bradford, is on sale via Hunters estate agency for £190,000.

It has a light and airy living room and a spacious kitchen-diner. The property has gardens at the front and rear and comes with one driveway parking space.

Bargain: This three-bed semi-detached home on sale via Hunters could be yours for £190,000
Bargain: This three-bed semi-detached home on sale via Hunters could be yours for £190,000
Chill time: The semi-detached house in Hopefield Way, Bierley, is light and airy inside
Chill time: The semi-detached house in Hopefield Way, Bierley, is light and airy inside
Culinary delights: The Bradford property comes equipped with a spacious kitchen-diner
Culinary delights: The Bradford property comes equipped with a spacious kitchen-diner
Relax: One of the three bedrooms on offer at the property in Bradford
Relax: One of the three bedrooms on offer at the property in Bradford

2. Two-bed flat, Plymouth, £220,000

Plush: This spacious two-bed flat in Plymouth is on sale via Julian Marks for £220,000
Plush: This spacious two-bed flat in Plymouth is on sale via Julian Marks for £220,000
Features: The period features at the two-bed flat in Plymouth are clear to see
Features: The period features at the two-bed flat in Plymouth are clear to see
All the mod cons: The Plymouth flat comes equipped with a newly fitted pristine kitchen
All the mod cons: The Plymouth flat comes equipped with a newly fitted pristine kitchen
Space: The Plymouth flat has a small private garden and communal grounds
Space: The Plymouth flat has a small private garden and communal grounds

This two-bedroom ground floor flat on sale via Julian Marks is set in a substantial end of terrace late Victorian-era property and is listed for £220,000.

The newly fitted kitchen is modern and stylish, and elsewhere charming period features have been retained.

The property has been owned by the same people since 1994 and comes with use of a small private garden, as well as a communal garden.

3. Four-bed house, Rochdale, £325,000

Ideal: This four-bed detached house on sale via Hunters could be yours for £325,000
Ideal: This four-bed detached house on sale via Hunters could be yours for £325,000
Family hub: The living room in this Rochdale property is spacious and calming
Family hub: The living room in this Rochdale property is spacious and calming
Ready to go: The property in Milnrow, Rochdale, is in turn key condition
Ready to go: The property in Milnrow, Rochdale, is in turn key condition

This four-bedroom detached property located in Milnrow, Rochdale, is on sale via Hunters for £325,000.

The house is in mint condition throughout with light and airy rooms. A family could move straight into this home without needing to lift a finger. There’s off-road parking, a single garage and gardens to the front and rear.

It’s an ideal property for a growing family.


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Culture

Assessing Property Size: What Square Footage Can You Get With The Average UK House Price In Your Area?

Assessing Property Size In The UK

In the United Kingdom, there is a prevailing tendency to gauge the size of residences based on the number of bedrooms rather than square footage. In fact, research indicates that three out of five individuals are unaware of the square footage of their property.

However, a comprehensive analysis conducted by ‘Savills’ reveals significant variations in property sizes throughout the country. For instance, with the average property price standing at £340,837, this amount would typically afford a studio flat spanning 551 square feet in London, according to the prominent estate agency.

Conversely, in the North East region, the same sum would secure a spacious five-bedroom house measuring 1,955 square feet, nearly four times the size of a comparable property in London.

Best value: Heading to the North East of England is where buyers will get the most from their money

In Scotland, the median house price equates to a sizable investment capable of procuring a generous four-bedroom residence spanning 1,743 square feet. Conversely, in Wales, Yorkshire & The Humber, and the North West, this sum affords a slightly smaller four-bedroom dwelling of approximately 1,500 square feet, while in the East and West Midlands, it accommodates a 1,300 square foot home. In stark contrast, within the South West, £340,837 secures a modest 1,000 square foot property, and in the East, an even more confined 928 square feet.

London presents the most challenging market, where this budget offers the least purchasing power. Following closely, the South East allows for 825 square feet of space or a medium-sized two-bedroom dwelling. Lucian Cook, head of residential research at Savills, emphasizes the profound disparity in purchasing potential across Britain, ranging from compact studio flats in London to spacious four or five-bedroom residences in parts of North East England.

While square footage serves as a critical metric, with a significant portion of Britons unfamiliar with their property’s dimensions, the number of bedrooms remains a traditional indicator of size. Personal preferences, such as a preference for larger kitchens, may influence property selection. For those prioritizing ample space, Easington, County Durham, offers a substantial 2,858 square foot, five-bedroom home, while Rhondda, Wales, and Na h-Eileanan an Iar, Scotland, provide 2,625 and 2,551 square feet, respectively. Conversely, in St Albans, Hertfordshire, £340,837 secures a mere 547 square feet, equivalent to a one-bedroom flat.

The disparity continues in central London, where purchasing power diminishes considerably. In Kensington, the budget accommodates a mere 220 square feet, contrasting with the slightly more spacious 236 square feet in Westminster. Conversely, in Dagenham, the same investment translates to 770 square feet. Three properties currently listed on Rightmove exemplify the diversity within this price range across the UK market.

South of the river: This semi-detached house is located near to three different train stations

South of the river: This semi-detached house is located near to three different train stations

2. Lewisham: One-bed house, £345,000

This one-bedroom property in Lewisham, South London, is on the market for £345,000.

The semi-detached house is set over two floors, and has a private patio.

The property is located near to bus links and amenities, as well as Catford train station.

Edinburgh fringe: This three-bed property is located on the edge of the city, near to the town of Musselburgh

Edinburgh fringe: This three-bed property is located on the edge of the city, near to the town of Musselburgh

3. Edinburgh: Three-bed house, £350,000

This three-bedroom detached house in Edinburgh could be yours for £350,000.

The house, which has a two-car driveway, boasts a large kitchen diner, and is within easy reach of Newcriaghall train station.


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Culture

Top 10 Florida Cities Dominate The Business Startup Landscape In The U.S.

Top 10 Florida Cities And Business Startup Landscape In The U.S.

The Voice Of EU | Florida emerges as a hub for entrepreneurial endeavors, with its vibrant business landscape and conducive environment for startups. Renowned for its low corporate tax rates and a high concentration of investors, the Sunshine State beckons aspiring entrepreneurs seeking fertile grounds to launch and grow their businesses.

In a recent report by WalletHub, Florida cities dominate the list of the top 10 best destinations for business startups, showcasing their resilience and economic vitality amidst challenging times.

From Orlando’s thriving market to Miami’s dynamic ecosystem, each city offers unique advantages and opportunities for entrepreneurial success. Let’s delve into the chronologically listed cities that exemplify Florida’s prominence in the business startup arena.

1. Orlando Leads the Way: Orlando emerges as the most attractive market in the U.S. for business startups, with a remarkable surge in small business establishments. WalletHub’s latest report highlights Orlando’s robust ecosystem, fostering the survival and growth of startups, buoyed by a high concentration of investors per capita.

2. Tampa Takes Second Place: Securing the second spot among large cities for business startups, Tampa boasts a favorable business environment attributed to its low corporate tax rates. The city’s ample investor presence further fortifies startups, providing essential resources for navigating the initial years of business operations.

3. Charlotte’s Diverse Industries: Claiming the third position, Charlotte stands out for its diverse industrial landscape and exceptionally low corporate taxes, enticing companies to reinvest capital. This conducive environment propels entrepreneurial endeavors, contributing to sustained economic growth.

4. Jacksonville’s Rising Profile: Jacksonville emerges as a promising destination for startups, bolstered by its favorable business climate. The city’s strategic positioning fosters entrepreneurial ventures, attracting aspiring business owners seeking growth opportunities.

5. Miami’s Entrepreneurial Hub: Miami solidifies its position as a thriving entrepreneurial hub, attracting businesses with its dynamic ecosystem and strategic location. The city’s vibrant startup culture and supportive infrastructure make it an appealing destination for ventures of all sizes.

6. Atlanta’s Economic Momentum: Atlanta’s ascent in the business startup landscape underscores its economic momentum and favorable business conditions. The city’s strategic advantages and conducive policies provide a fertile ground for entrepreneurial ventures to flourish.

7. Fort Worth’s Business-Friendly Environment: Fort Worth emerges as a prime destination for startups, offering a business-friendly environment characterized by low corporate taxes. The city’s supportive ecosystem and strategic initiatives facilitate the growth and success of new ventures.

8. Austin’s Innovation Hub: Austin cements its status as an innovation hub, attracting startups with its vibrant entrepreneurial community and progressive policies. The city’s robust infrastructure and access to capital foster a conducive environment for business growth and innovation.

9. Durham’s Emerging Entrepreneurship Scene: Durham’s burgeoning entrepreneurship scene positions it as a promising destination for startups, fueled by its supportive ecosystem and strategic initiatives. The city’s collaborative culture and access to resources contribute to the success of new ventures.

10. St. Petersburg’s Thriving Business Community: St. Petersburg rounds off the top 10 with its thriving business community and supportive ecosystem for startups. The city’s strategic advantages and favorable business climate make it an attractive destination for entrepreneurial endeavors.

Despite unprecedented challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Great Resignation, and high inflation, these top Florida cities remain resilient and well-equipped to overcome obstacles, offering promising opportunities for business owners and entrepreneurs alike.


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