Connect with us

Real Estate

TCD speakers awarded top spots in semi-final

Published

on

Speakers from Trinity College Dublin were named the winners of the Irish Times semi-final on Saturday and will progress to the final event in June.

Megan O’Driscoll and Kate Maher of Trinity College Dublin’s Philosophical Society (the Phil) society took the top team spot and Gabrielle Fullam of the College Historical Society (the Hist) was awarded the top speaker spot.

The motion debated at this semi-final was: “This house believes justice movements must reclaim forgiveness”.

Arguing against the motion, Megan O’Driscoll said that “movements of people owe nothing to the systems or people who do them harm.”

“Forgiveness absolves oppressors of the responsibility to do any amount of work before claiming the title of ‘ally’… Forgiveness helps people move on but you can’t move on if you are still being oppressed,” she said.

“When forgiveness is offered as a default olive branch and there’s no prior restorative or rehabilitative work required, people increase the mass of your movement, but are they really helpful?” Ms O’Driscoll asked.

The pair scattered humour throughout their speeches and argued that forgiveness is “the status quo”.

Speaking for the opposition, Kate Maher said “Reclaiming forgiveness does not help justice movements achieve their goal because institutions of oppression use forgiveness against them.”

‘Weaponised’ forgiveness

Ms Maher used the example of the Catholic Church, which she argued “weaponised” forgiveness against people of Catholic faith. “If you don’t want to be a sinner, then you forgive what was done to you and what you saw being done… When finally they had to acknowledge the movement, they did what Jesus would have done, they asked forgiveness,” she said.

Ms Maher said refusing to grant forgiveness on behalf of movements and “active non-forgiveness” looked like moving back from the Church, and like affirmative action in South Africa and Northern Ireland.

“Active non-forgiveness is demanding reparations and not stopping even after you get them,” she said.

Held through an online Zoom call on Saturday, the black-tie event was one of 4 semi-final debates held throughout April. The Irish Times Debate final is scheduled for June.

The event was chaired by Conor Houston, who is a previous finalist of the debate and is now on the board of the Irish Times Trust. Mr Houston has been heavily involved in advocacy and work on peace and reconciliation. Speaking after the debate, Mr Houston commended those who cited forgiveness in the context of the peace process in Northern Ireland and the Good Friday Agreement.

Reconciliation should be “the absolute overriding objective”, Mr Houston said, adding “the responsibility of this generation, if we’re really going to affect change, is going to be to constantly figure out how we can better engage and understand those with whom we disagree.”

Source link

Real Estate

Extending grace period on checks in North would be ‘problematic’ – Taoiseach

Published

on

Taoiseach Micheál Martin has said it will be “very problematic” if the UK again extends unilaterally the grace period for Northern Ireland Protocol checks.

But speaking on the Trevor Phillips on Sunday programme on Sky News, Mr Martin also insisted a breakthrough between the EU and UK was still possible “if there’s a will there on both sides”.

His comments came after Boris Johnson escalated his dispute with the European Union by warning he will do whatever it takes to keep goods flowing from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

Following talks with the EU’s key figures on Saturday, the British prime minister said he would not hesitate to take unilateral action to protect the position of Northern Ireland in the increasingly bitter row over post-Brexit trading arrangements.

The row – dubbed the “sausage war” – could mean chilled meats will not be shipped across the Irish Sea because of EU rules after the end of the month.

The UK is considering extending the current grace period without the consent of Brussels to ensure that sausages and mince can continue to reach Northern Ireland’s shops.

But Mr Martin told Sky News that the “channels do exist to get this resolved”.

He added: “In particular, the Sefcovic/Frost process should be fully explored and optimised to get an agreement and I think the prospects, in my view, if there’s a will there on both sides, and there is a will there from the European Union side I know that, I detect from the British prime minister Boris Johnson that the British government is anxious to get a resolution of this, so I think we should work at it.”

Mr Martin said he believed an SPS agreement (on plant and animal health measures) could remove 80 per cent of protocol checks.

When asked about the possibility of the UK unilaterally extending the grace period for checks, Mr Martin said: “I think it will be very problematic because it’s not about sausages per se, it really is about the fact that an agreement had been entered into, not too long ago, signed off by the British government with the European Union.

“If there’s consistent, unilateral deviation from that agreement, that clearly undermines the broader relationship between the European Union and the United Kingdom, which is in nobody’s interest and therefore that’s why the UK with the EU have to work very hard now in the coming weeks.

“I know the European Union are anxious to resolve this and want to resolve it but they need to see a similar reciprocity from the UK side.”

When asked if the protocol is undermining Northern Ireland’s place within the UK, Mr Martin said: “We’ve never seen the Protocol as a constitutional issue, it doesn’t in any way interfere with the constitutional status of Northern Ireland as defined and articulated in the Good Friday [Belfast] Agreement.

“We’re very clear from the Irish Government perspective on that, but we do believe in seamless trade on the island of Ireland, it makes sense. We believe in seamless trade insofar as we possibly can between the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland.”

‘A bit of respect’

British foreign secretary Dominic Raab accused EU leaders of trying to undermine the status of Northern Ireland as part of the United Kingdom.

After talks at the G7 summit in Cornwall between Boris Johnson and key EU figures failed to achieve a breakthrough in the dispute over the implementation of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement in Northern Ireland, Mr Raab said the EU was showing a lack of respect.

“What we cannot have is the continuing disruption of trade and effectively try to change the status of Northern Ireland, contrary to the consent and wishes of the people, which is not just contrary to the Northern Ireland Protocol but also to the Belfast Agreement,” he told Mr Phillips on Sky News.

“We have serially seen senior EU figures talk about Northern Ireland as if it was some kind of different country to the UK. It is not only offensive, it has real-world effects on the communities in Northern Ireland, creates great concern, great consternation.

“Could you imagine if we talked about Catalonia, the Flemish part of Belgium, one of the lander in Germany, northern Italy, Corsica in France as different countries. We need a bit of respect here.– PA

Source link

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Aviva Investors acquires Dutch logistics portfolio

Published

on

Union Investment has sold a logistics portfolio comprising two assets in the Netherlands for an undisclosed sum. In Nijmegen, a 35,000m² distribution centre located at Bijsterhuizen 1127 was sold to its tenant while in Eindhoven, a 64,000m² warehouse was sold to Aviva Investors.

 

The contemporary warehouse property in Nijmegen was designed by local architect firm Schreven BV, constructed between 1997 and 2000, and features 10 – 14.5 meters clear height and up to 5,000 kg/m² floor load capacity. It is fully leased to a worldwide courier, who purchased the property for its own use.

 

The Eindhoven facility is located within the logistics distribution centre ‘Acht’ in Eindhoven, situated close to both the A2 and A67 motorways and the city’s international airport, whilst also being adjacent to one of the main railroad arteries which provides direct access to the Rotterdam harbour.

 

Stephan Riechers, Head of Investment Management Logistics & Light Industrial at Union Investment, said: “The transaction follows our recent acquisition of a Pan-European logistics portfolio that contained these assets. They were sold as they did not align with the strategy of our open-ended real estate fund UniImmo: Europa. We typically focus on new developments, new builds and existing properties built in the last 10 years. The transaction was a good opportunity to optimize the fund’s portfolio.”

 

Douglas van Oers, Director and Co-Head Logistics & Industrial at Savills in the Netherlands, said: “The logistics real estate stock in the Netherlands grew by 3 million m² in 2020, while the vacancy rate fell from 6.1% to 5.6%, indicating continued interest in logistics real estate. In 2020, over 2.6 million m² of logistics real estate was leased and this ongoing demand is causing rents in many regions to rise. The Eindhoven asset aligned perfectly with Aviva Investors’ desire to invest in strategically important locations for their European logistics portfolio, and the asset management opportunities of this particular property caught their interest.”

 

Source link

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Where are the most expensive streets in England and Wales?

Published

on

The most expensive street in the country has been revealed as Avenue Road in London, where the average house price is £30.5million.

Avenue Road is in the affluent area of St John’s Wood in north west London, and it is lined with multi-million pound mansions.

The road is a main corridor into central London, leading into Regent’s Park. It has caught the eyes of wealthy buyers in recent years and is dubbed one of the city’s ‘most desirable destinations’.

This six-bed detached house is in the most expensive street in England and Wales - Avenue Road in St John's Wood, London - and is for sale for £27.5m

This six-bed detached house is in the most expensive street in England and Wales – Avenue Road in St John’s Wood, London – and is for sale for £27.5m

The most expensive streets in the country have been revealed by Lloyds Bank

The most expensive streets in the country have been revealed by Lloyds Bank

Avenue Road has good access to transport links and local amenities, but it has managed to escape the traffic congestion that makes other expensive roads in the capital less appealing.

But perhaps more importantly is that Avenue Road has been one of the few thoroughfare’s in the area where wealthy buyers can still snap up substantial plots of land in recent years – up to an acre – that are big enough to accommodate the ‘trophy homes’ they desire.

It means that even relatively ‘small’ and outdated properties on Avenue Road are seen as premium purchases, as buyers are often able to knock them down to make room for even bigger – and more valuable – homes in their place.

Buying agent Henry Pryor said: ‘Homes on Avenue Road go for mega bucks. Why? Because this is where one-upmanship is practiced at Olympic levels. 

‘The people here never settle for second best so the homes that are currently for sale are more expensive than the ones that have been sold – but they in turn will be eclipsed by the homes that are now being planned.’ 

Avenue Road replaces last year’s top spot, Ilchester Place in London’s Holland Park, where homebuyers last year could pay around £17million for the luxury address.

This eight-bed detached house in Avenue Road, London, is for sale for £25m via estate agents Glentree

This eight-bed detached house in Avenue Road, London, is for sale for £25m via estate agents Glentree

One of the most expensive streets is Ilchester Place in London's Holland Park (pictured)

One of the most expensive streets is Ilchester Place in London’s Holland Park (pictured)

The second most expensive is Tite Street in Chelsea, with an average house price of £28,902,000

The second most expensive is Tite Street in Chelsea, with an average house price of £28,902,000

Avenue Road’s impressive new entry, along with others in this year’s list by Lloyds Bank have reached the top following only a few lucrative transactions on these sought-after streets.

The second most expensive is Tite Street in Chelsea, and has an average house price of £28,902,000.

It is followed by South Audley Street where a home among the Mayfair Christmas lights will set you back £22.85million on average.

Holland Park’s Ilchester Place at £16,583,000 and Holland Villas Road at £15,815,000, are in fourth and fifth place respectively.

Pictured: Grosvenor Crescent in London's Belgravia is one of the most expensive streets

Pictured: Grosvenor Crescent in London’s Belgravia is one of the most expensive streets

All of the top 10 most expensive places to live are in London, with the prestigious areas of Kensington and Chelsea and the City of Westminster dominating the list.

However, the capital is being challenged by the South East in the rest of the top 20 most expensive streets in England and Wales.

The priciest properties in the South East are now an average of £5.6million, up from £4.4million in 2019, according to Lloyds Bank.

Seaside location Christchurch Road in Bournemouth has entered at number 16 this year, with properties in the area costing £6,264,000 on average.

Andrew Mason, of Lloyds Bank, said: ‘It comes as no surprise that London continues to rule the roost of the country’s prime property market, however we are seeing a marked growth in prices in the south east and across other UK regions. 

‘The average house price, in the most expensive streets in the South East has risen by over a staggering £1million in the past year.

‘Elsewhere your typical home on Wales’s most expensive street this year is just shy of £2million, compared to last year’s top average of £900,000. 

‘Meanwhile the new priciest street in the North is located in Windermere, where your average home will also cost you north of £2million, up from last year’s mean price of just over £1.5million.’

This six-bed detached house on St George's Hill, Weybridge, Surrey is for sale with a guide price of £14.5m

This six-bed detached house on St George’s Hill, Weybridge, Surrey is for sale with a guide price of £14.5m

The most expensive streets in each region…

North 

The top two most expensive streets in the North are in Windermere – Old Hall Road, which has an average house price of £2,508,000, followed by Newby Bridge Road at £1,533,000.

Five of the top 10 most expensive streets are based in Newcastle Upon Tyne – with Montagu Avenue being the most expensive at £1,225,000, four in Windermere and one in Durham.

North West

In the North West, all the expensive streets are in Altrincham, Macclesfield, Knutsford and Alderley Edge.

Barrow Lane in Altrincham is the most expensive street with homes selling, on average, for £3,706,000 followed by Green Walk at £2,763,000 and East Downs Road at £2,475,000 – all in Altrincham.

Bradford Lane at £2,375,000 and Withinlee Road at £2,336,000 are both in Macclesfield, and complete the top five.

Yorkshire and the Humber

The most expensive street in Yorkshire and the Humber is Linton Lane in Whetherby at £1,906,000, followed by St. Georges Place in York at £1,645,000, and Fulwith Mill Lane in Harrogate at £1,644,000.

Ling Lane in Leeds at £1,425,000 and Driffield Terrace in York at £1,375,000 make up the top five most expensive streets in the region.

West Midlands

In the West Midlands, Old Warwick Road with an average house price of £2,278,000 and Rising Lane at £1,868,000 – which are both in Solihull – and Cherry Hill Road at £1,850,000 in Birmingham, are the three priciest addresses.

These are followed by Temple Road in Solihull at £1,817,000, Ladywood Road in Sutton Coldfield at £1,694,000 and Liveridge Hill in Henley-In-Arden at £1,629,000.

East Midlands

Benscliffe Road in Leicester is the most expensive street in the East Midlands with an average price of £3,288,000, followed by Ulverscroft Land, also in Leicester but at half the price, with typical values at £1,644,000.

Cour D’Honneur in Oakham at £1,588,000, Wollaton Road in Nottingham at £1.57million and Warren Hill in Leicester at £1,547,000 complete the top five.

East Anglia

Streets of Cambridge dominate the 10 most expensive in East Anglia. Most of these streets are close to the main university area in the CB2 and CB3 postal districts.

Chaucer Road is the most expensive street at £3,610,000 followed by Clarkson Road at £2.93million, Storeys Way at £2,585,000, Millington Rad at £2,351,000 and then Cranmer Road at £2,233,000.

South East

The region’s most desirable addresses are in the towns of Weybridge and Leatherhead. South Ridge in Weybridge is the most expensive with an average price of £7,125,000, followed by East Road, also in Weybridge at £6,643,000.

In third place is Montrose Gardens in Leatherhead at an average price of £6,272,000 and completing the south east top five are Birds Hill Drive in Leatherhead at £5,313,000 and Camp End Road in, Weybridge at £5,237,000.

South West

The most expensive streets in the south west are found in Bath, Bournemouth, and Poole. Christchurch Road in Bournemouth is the most expensive with an average house price of £6,264,000, followed by Bath’s The Circus at £3,117,000 and Kelston Road at £3,079,000.

Streets in Poole make up six out of the 10 most expensive streets, with Panaorama Road at £2,982,000 and Pearce Avenue at £28million completing the top five.

Wales

Benar Headland in Pwllheli is Wales’s most expensive street with an average price of £1,928,000. The most expensive street in the Welsh capital of Cardiff is Llandennis Avenue, where the average house price will set buyers back £1,803,000.

Most expensive streets in England and Wales 2020 
Street Name Posttown Region Postcode Average House Price £
2015-2020*
Avenue Road London Greater London NW8 30,500,000
Tite Street London Greater London SW3 28,902,000
South Audley Street London Greater London W1K 22,850,000
Ilchester Place London Greater London W14 16,583,000
Holland Villas Road London Greater London W14 15,815,000
Manresa Road London Greater London SW3 15,518,000
Tregunter Road London Greater London SW10 15,510,000
Grosvenor Crescent London Greater London SW1X 15,440,000
Chester Square London Greater London SW1W 15,400,000
Knightsbridge London Greater London SW1X 14,954,000
South Ridge Weybridge South East KT13 7,125,000
East Road Weybridge South East KT13 6,643,000
Montrose Gardens Leatherhead South East KT22 6,272,000
Christchurch Road Bournemouth South West BH1 6,264,000
Birds Hill Drive Leatherhead South East KT22 5,313,000
Camp End Road Weybridge South East KT13 5,237,000
Brooks Close Weybridge South East KT13 5,100,000
Virginia Avenue Virginia Water South East GU25 5,083,000
Hatton Hill Windlesham South East GU20 5,009,000
Fishers Wood Ascot South East Sl5 4,996,000
Source: Lloyds Bank         

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!