Connect with us

Technology

South-east Ireland to get its first university with opening of SETU

Voice Of EU

Published

on

SETU is formed by the amalgamation of Waterford and Carlow ITs. It has campuses in Wicklow, Wexford, Carlow, Kilkenny and Waterford.

A new technological university is opening in the south-east of Ireland. The Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris ratified the establishment of South East Technological University (SETU) on (May 1).

The new university involves the amalgamation of Waterford and Carlow ITs. It has campuses across the south east in Wicklow, Wexford, Carlow, Kilkenny and Waterford.

Future Human

SETU will celebrate its official launch this September when it begins its first intake of students for the academic year.

SETU currently serves more than 18,000 students and employs around 1,500 staff. It aims to grow its student numbers to 25,000 and its staff numbers to 2,000 in the next 10 years.

The new university brings together more than 550 research active staff, nine research centres,  and one research institute. It will also be home to four of Technology Gateways, which are part of a nationwide group of networks run by Enterprise Ireland and Irish ITs. The four Technology Gateways are located across Waterford and Carlow.

Signing the university into existence, Harris said, “This really is a red letter day for the south-east. Now for the first time a university stands in the south-east. This new university can build on the enormous strengths of both institutes and really put a mark on the quality of higher education, employment, enterprise and skills creation, expanded research, socio-economic and regional development in the vibrant south east. The new university will be building on and with very firm foundations.”

Harris acknowledged the hard work put in to the ITs and the programme to establish SETU by its stakeholders across the region. He said their work would be matched by State investment in infrastructure and new buildings, education and research.

He also appointed SETU’s first president, Prof Veronica Campbell.

Campbell said: “We are ambitious for our new university and for our region. We want to become a leading European technological university, transforming lives, and driving growth through excellence in learning, research, collaboration and innovation. SETU will play a pivotal role in regional development, attracting talent, inward investment and research opportunities to the south east.”

Campbell has previously held several senior leadership roles in Trinity College Dublin, including Dean of graduate studies and bursar and director of strategic innovation. She currently serves on the board of the Atlantic Institute, based in Oxford University. She is a former president of the biomedical sciences section of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland.

Plans for SETU’s establishment were initially announced last November.

10 things you need to know direct to your inbox every weekday. Sign up for the Daily Brief, Silicon Republic’s digest of essential sci-tech news.

Source link

Technology

Kids’ tech: the best children’s gadgets for summer holidays | Gadgets

Voice Of EU

Published

on

With the long school summer holiday well under way, you may need a bit of help keeping the kids entertained. From walkie-talkies and cameras to tablets, robot toys and fitness trackers, here are some of the best kid-aimed tech to keep the little (and not-so-little) ones occupied.

Robot toys

Sphero Mini – about £50

Sphero Mini robotic ball.
Sphero Mini robotic ball. Photograph: Bryan Rowe/Sphero

Lots of tech toys are fads but my longtime favourite has stood the test of time as a modern update to remote control fun. Sphero is a ball you control using a smartphone or tablet, and has hidden depths, with games and educational elements also available.

The mini Sphero ball is a lot of fun to drive around and small enough that overexuberant indoor excursions won’t result in broken furniture and scuffed-up paintwork. The Sphero Play app has games, while the Sphero Edu app is great at fostering creative learning.

Kids or big kids can learn to program, follow examples, get the robot to do all sorts of things, or go deeper and write some code for it in JavaScript. Higher-end versions such as the £190 BOLT take the educational elements to the next level, too.

Tablets

Amazon Fire 7 Kids – about £110

Amazon Fire 7 Kids edition tablet.
Amazon Fire 7 Kids edition tablet. Photograph: Amazon

If you would rather not lend your precious breakable phone or iPad to your little ones, Amazon’s practically indestructible Kids edition tablets could be just the ticket.

The cheapest and smallest Fire 7 has just been updated and is available in a range of bright-coloured cases with a pop-out stand. If your offspring do manage to break it, Amazon will replace it for free under its two-year “worry-free” guarantee.

It does all the standard tablet things such as movies, apps, games, a web browser if you want it, and parental controls to lock it, set time limits and age filters. There’s even an option restricting access to curated child-safe sites and videos but it doesn’t have access to the Google Play store, only Amazon’s app store.

The Kids edition comes with a one-year subscription to Amazon Kids+ (£3 to £7 a month afterwards), which is a curated collection of child-friendly text and audio books, movies, TV shows and educational apps.

The larger £140 Fire HD 8 and £200 Fire HD 10 are available in Kids versions, too, if you want something bigger, or Amazon’s new Kids Pro tablets start at £100 with additional features aimed at school-age children.

Alternatives include LeapFrog’s various educational tablets, which are fine for younger children, or hand-me-down or refurbished iPads (from £150) in robust cases, which can be locked down with some parental controls.

Cameras

VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 – about £39

VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 kids’ camera in pink.
VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 kids’ camera in pink. Photograph: VTech

Before the advent of smartphones, standalone cameras were the way we visually documented our lives, and they still can be a bit of creative fun and inspiration for kids.

The VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 is a “my first digital camera” of sorts made of rugged plastic and simple in operation, which VTech reckons is suitable for three- to nine-year-olds. It captures 5MP photos of reasonable quality and can shoot from the back for selfies, too, all viewable on a 2.4in screen.

The optical viewfinder helps them line up the shot, which they can transform with fun filters and effects. It even shoots video, too. The kid-centric nature of it might turn off older children but every award-winning photographer has to start somewhere before the smartphone takes over.

It needs an SD card for storage and takes four AA batteries at a time, and chews through them fast, so buy some rechargeables to help save money and the planet.

For older children, rugged and waterproof action cams could be the way to go, shooting video and photos. Budget no-brand cams cost from about £80 but secondhand or refurbished models from the big boys such as GoPro and DJI go for about £100 and on eBay and elsewhere.

Fitness trackers

Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 – from about £55

Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 Star Wars edition.
Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 Star Wars edition. Photograph: Garmin

Your child may not need any encouragement to tear about the place but if you are after a gadget to “gamify” and reward their activity – as well as giving them a smartwatch-esque gadget to play with – the Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 could be a winner for ages four and up.

Its watch-like form comes in various themes and designs, including with various Star Wars, Marvel and Disney characters, with custom watchfaces to choose from. The user-replaceable coin-cell battery lasts a year, so you don’t have to worry about charging it. Water-resistance to 50 metres means swimming should be no problem either.

It tracks steps, activity and sleep with motivational messaging. It has mini games to play once your child has hit their goals, and can all be managed from a parent’s phone or tablet, so you can keep an eye on their data. Parents can even set goals, competitions with their own activity levels, chore reminders and tasks that can earn virtual coins for them to trade for rewards with you.

It is button-operated rather than touchscreen, and the backlight doesn’t stay on long to preserve the battery.

If you are a user of Google’s Fitbit trackers yourself, then the firm’s Ace 3 (£50) means you can compete on activity, but it needs charging every seven or so days. Other cheaper adult-focused fitness trackers such as the Xiaomi Mi Smart Band 6 (about £29) may be better for older children.

Walkie-talkies

Motorola T42 Talkabout – about £35 for three

Motorola Talkabout T42 two-way radios.
Motorola Talkabout T42 two-way radios. Photograph: Motorola Solutions

Walkie-talkies are a great replacement for phones, allowing kids and big kids to keep in touch without fear of fees or smashed screens.

There are plenty of child-centric options available with various character themes but basic units usually work better. Motorola’s T42 Talkabout comes in various colours and multipacks.

They are simple to set up, with a pairing button and multiple channel selection to find a clear one. Once going, just push to talk, even over long distances. Their quoted 4km range might be a bit ambitious but they should be good for at least 500 metres in urban environments, or much further in the open air.

They take three AAA batteries each, which last about 18 hours of talking or roughly three to four days in active use, so you might need a small army of rechargeable batteries.

They have a belt clip and loop for hooking to a carabiner (metal loop) or similar, and are fairly rugged, too, so should survive being launched across a room or two.

Nestling’s camouflage walkie-talkies (about £26) are also a popular choice but there are lots of choices under £30 available on the high street.

Source link

Continue Reading

Technology

India’s latest rocket flies but payloads don’t prosper • The Register

Voice Of EU

Published

on

India’s small satellite launch vehicle (SSLV) made a spectacular debut launch on Sunday, but the mission fell short of overall success when two satellites were inserted into the incorrect orbit, rendering them space junk.

The SSLV was developed to carry payloads of up to 500 kg to low earth orbits on an “on-demand basis”. India hopes the craft will let its space agency target commercial launches.

Although it is capable of achieving 500 km orbits, SSLV’s Saunday payload was an 135 kg earth observation satellite called EOS-2 and student-designed 8 kg 8U cubesat AzaadiSAT. Both were intended for a 356 km orbit at an inclination of about 37 degrees.

That rocket missed that target.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) identified the root cause of the failure Sunday night: a failure of logic to identify a sensor failure during the rocket stage.

ISRO further tweeted a committee would analyse the situation and provide recommendations as the org prepared for SSLV-D2.

ISRO Chairman S Somanath further explained the scenario in a video statement, before vowing to become completely successful in the second development flight of SSLV. “The vehicle took off majestically,” said Somanath who categorized the three rocket stages and launch as a success.

“However, we subsequently noticed an anomaly in the placement of the satellites in the orbit. The satellites were placed in an elliptical orbit in place of a circular orbit,” caveated the chairman.

Somanath said the satellites could not withstand the atmospheric drag in the elliptical orbit and had already fallen and become “no longer usable.” The sensor isolation principle is to be corrected before SSLV’s second launch to occur “very soon.”

Although ISRO has put on a brave face, its hard to imagine the emotions of the school children who designed AzaadiSat. According to the space org, the satellite was built by female students in rural regions across the country, with guidance and integrated by the student team of of student space-enthusiast org Space Kidz India.

EOS-2 was designed by ISRO and was slated to offer advanced optical remote sensing in infra-red band with high spatial resolution. ®



Source link

Continue Reading

Technology

The top languages you need for app development

Voice Of EU

Published

on

Code Institute’s Daragh Ó Tuama explains what budding app developers need to know when it comes to programming languages.

App development is the intricate process of designing, implementing and developing mobile applications. The applications are either developed by independent professional freelancers or by a team of skilled developers belonging to a giant firm.

There are countless aspects to consider when it comes to application development, such as the size of the app, the design, the concept and many more. To obtain optimum results, a proficient developer should be knowledgeable in all of these areas.

Is it, however, simple to create an application? The answer is up to you. It is really simple to develop an app if you understand and practise adequately.

The first thing, even before choosing a programming language, one should decide on which platform they are writing the program for. As we all know, there are two major platforms for mobile applications: iOS and Android. So, to begin, choose one of the two options.

You can choose one or both, but you must be familiar with two concepts: native development and cross-platform programming.

With native development, developers choose one platform and produce programs exclusively for that platform. If you’re a native Android developer, you create native Android apps that only run on Android; similarly, if you’re an iOS developer, you build native iOS apps that only work on iOS.

Cross-platform development is the term used to describe applications that are created once and can operate on any platform, including Android and iOS.

After choosing the above options, one should learn the related programming languages.

Python

Whether it is software, website or app development, there is no way Python is not used in it.

The increasingly popular programming language, which is recognised for its simple syntax and robust features, has garnered a reputation among novices and professionals alike.

Python is used to programme the back-ends of several prominent applications that we use on a daily basis, such as YouTube, Instagram and Pinterest. We can see Python’s power by looking at the above apps, which are noted for their popularity, efficiency and security.

Other reasons to learn Python:

  • Easy to read, learn and write codes
  • It is an interpreted language
  • Free and open source
  • Has extensive library support
  • Python is flexible

Python is also widely used in various technology fields, including machine learning, data analytics and many more.

JavaScript

When it comes to creating applications for the web, there are some programming languages you must know to be considered a professional, and top of the list of must-know programming languages is JavaScript.

JavaScript is required for the distinctive features you put in your program to perform tasks seamlessly on any device or platform.

Also, it is a full-stack language, which means with JavaScript you can build an interactive and visually appealing front-end and an efficient and powerful back-end too.

Other reasons to learn JavaScript:

  • Since it is an interpreted language, the speed of execution is immaculate
  • The structure of the syntax is simple and easy to grasp
  • JavaScript works smoothly along with other languages
  • With JavaScript, developers can add rich features to their applications
  • It has multiple valuable frameworks such as jQuery, Angular, Vue and Svelte

Along with JavaScript frameworks, developers can develop platform-independent applications.

Java

Java is an approved language for developing Android apps. Therefore, to commence your app developer journey, studying Java will most likely not only help you master app development rapidly, but will also assist you in quickly understanding other relevant languages.

Java has its own set of open-source libraries, including a wealth of functionalities and APIs that developers may easily integrate into their coding.

Other reasons to learn Java:

  • Java is an object-oriented language
  • Java can execute in various settings, including virtual machines and browsers
  • Code reusability and portability
  • Strong memory management

Another upside of mastering Java is its omnipresence. Since Java is a versatile programming language, it is also employed in website and software development. By learning it, you can learn more than just app development and may be handy in the long run if you need to change careers.

Kotlin

Kotlin is yet another official language of Android development. This is thanks to its roots in Java. So yes, Kotlin is very similar to Java and may be thought of as a more advanced version of Java programming.

Kotlin allows developers to create more robust and complex mobile applications.

Other reasons to learn Kotlin:

  • Writing programs in Kotlin means less robust code
  • It’s fully compatible with Java
  • Developers can use Kotlin to construct platform-independent applications
  • It features a simple and straightforward syntax
  • Includes Android and SDK toolkit

Kotlin might be a wonderful and accessible alternative for novices who find Java difficult.

Dart

Dart is a relatively new programming language when compared to other languages that have been around for a long time.

It may be used on both the front-end and the back-end. The syntax is comparable to C, making it simple to pick up.

Another distinctive aspect of Dart is that it is a programming language created especially for Android development by Google.

Other reasons to learn Dart:

  • It has a clean syntax
  • It has a set of versatile tools to help in programming
  • Dart is portable
  • It is used by Flutter
  • Can write and run the code anywhere

Dart also allows developers to create web-based applications in addition to mobile apps.

Swift

Swift is a programming language built specifically for designing and developing mobile applications, but only for iOS.

Created by tech giant Apple, Swift is a multi-paradigm, general-purpose compiled programming language.

Prior to the introduction of Swift, the preferred and customary programming language for iOS app development was Objective C. Swift’s versatility and durability has supplanted the necessity for Objective C.

Other reasons to learn Swift:

  • It has a concise code structure
  • It has efficient memory management
  • Swift is fast to execute
  • It supports dynamic libraries
  • It is compatible with objective C

As one of the most popular programming languages for iOS app developers, Swift allows users to learn and develop applications quickly and easily.

C++

Although not exactly a preferred programming language for app development, with C++ developers can expect to create robust applications.

C++ is used to create Android apps and native app development. Mainly, using this programming language, games, cloud and banking applications are created.

Other reasons to learn C++:

  • C++ is a multi-paradigm programming language
  • C++ is an object-oriented programming language and includes classes, inheritance, polymorphism, data abstraction and encapsulation
  • Supports dynamic memory allocation
  • C++ codes run faster
  • It is a platform-independent language

Because C++ applications can run on any platform, developers can use it to create cross-platform apps for Android, iOS and Windows.

Learn core concepts

Having a solid grasp of fundamentals is necessary to become a versatile app developer. Without mastering them, building complex applications will become tedious.

The following are some fundamental notions in every programming language:

  • Variables
  • Data structures
  • Syntax
  • Control structures
  • Tools

Choose a good programming course

One needs a mentor to grasp and understand the intricacies of a programming language or a related profession.

Before choosing a course, make sure that course is for you. For example, if you are a beginner, choose courses that are created for beginners that can give you a generous tech stack. On the other hand, if you already have adequate programming knowledge, you can either choose the beginner ones or go for intermediate ones.

Join the community

Each and every programming language has a dedicated community that is active with a vast number of skilled developers. Joining such communities will help you keep up to date about the latest features and tactics of the particular language.

Some of the popular platforms for programming communities are:

  • Stack Overflow
  • Reddit subreddits
  • GitHub

For instance, if you are learning Python, join the Python community on any of the above platforms. The same goes for other programming languages.

Also, if you have any queries regarding any errors of concepts, you can find answers in these communities since most doubts you face are not new.

Build mini applications

While learning app development, try putting your knowledge into work during the learning period instead of waiting for the course to end.

Try building mini applications at first. It can be as simple as a Hello World app that displays ‘hello world’. Then try upgrading to the calculator, memo, weather forecast and many more.

Since programming is a skill that grows only through practise, it is essential to practise while learning.

While developing mini projects, it is also customary to face errors. Instead of relying on communities, try resolving the mistakes on your own. Doing so will enhance your problem-solving ability, which is a great skill that every recruiter looks for in a developer.

By Daragh Ó Tuama

Daragh Ó Tuama is the digital content and production manager of Code Institute. A version of this article previously appeared on the Code Institute blog.

10 things you need to know direct to your inbox every weekday. Sign up for the Daily Brief, Silicon Republic’s digest of essential sci-tech news.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!