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Pandemic boom sends house prices soaring 20%, says Nationwide

House prices have rocketed 20 per cent in the two years since the coronavirus pandemic began and the average home is up £29,000 over the past year alone, figures revealed today.

Britain’s biggest building society Nationwide said the pandemic property boom continues apace, with the average house price rising almost another £5,000 or 1.7 per cent last month to breach £260,000 for the first time.

House price inflation climbed to 12.6 per cent in February, with the average home costing £260,320 – £44,138 higher than in February 2020.

Up and away: House prices dipped slightly as the pandemic hit and then soared as a boom took hold, Nationwide's index shows

Up and away: House prices dipped slightly as the pandemic hit and then soared as a boom took hold, Nationwide’s index shows

After a brief fall after the initial Covid lockdown arrived in the UK in March 2020 and the property market frozen until later than spring, house prices then began to surge later that year.

This has created a fresh affordability crisis in the UK’s property market, driving the cost of a home relative to wages up from already elevated levels to the highs seen just before the financial crisis.

Analysts expect the cost of living crisis to crimp the market, but the crunch for household budgets has failed to make much of a dent yet.

Nationwide’s chief economist, Robert Gardner, said: ‘Housing market activity has remained robust in recent months, with mortgage approvals continuing to run above pre-pandemic levels at the start of the year. A combination of robust demand and limited stock of homes on the market has kept upward pressure on prices.

‘The continued buoyancy of the housing market is a little surprising, given the mounting pressure on household budgets from rising inflation, which reached a 30-year high of 5.5 per cent in January, and since borrowing costs have started to move up from all-time lows in recent months.

‘The strength is particularly noteworthy since the squeeze on household incomes has led to a significant weakening of consumer confidence.

‘Indeed, consumers’ view of the general economic outlook and prospects for their own financial circumstances over the next 12 months have plunged towards levels prevailing at the start of the pandemic.’

Inflation pain: The pandemic boom has delivered an affordability crisis, with house prices rising to record levels compared to wages - similar to just before the financial crisis

Inflation pain: The pandemic boom has delivered an affordability crisis, with house prices rising to record levels compared to wages – similar to just before the financial crisis

An acute shortage of homes being listed for sale is said to be behind the price increases, as this increases competition for those which do become available. 

On average there are currently 19 homes for sale per estate agency office compared to an average of 552 registered house hunters, according to Propertymark, the membership body for estate agents.

This means that a typical estate agent has 29 potential buyers for every available property.

On the market: This three-bed home near Great Missenden in Buckinghamshire is listed on Rightmove with a guide price of £1.25million

On the market: This three-bed home near Great Missenden in Buckinghamshire is listed on Rightmove with a guide price of £1.25million

This three-bed home in Blockley in the Cotswolds is on the market for £390,000 and has three bedrooms and one bathroom

This three-bed home in Blockley in the Cotswolds is on the market for £390,000 and has three bedrooms and one bathroom

In Radcliffe near Bury in Greater Manchester, buyers can snap up this four-bed detached home with views over a golf course for £700,000

In Radcliffe near Bury in Greater Manchester, buyers can snap up this four-bed detached home with views over a golf course for £700,000

A three-bed bungalow on the outskirts of Perth in Scotland is on the market for £185,000

A three-bed bungalow on the outskirts of Perth in Scotland is on the market for £185,000

Jonathan Hopper, CEO of Garrington Property Finders, said: ‘Competition remains extremely stiff for homes in the most desirable areas.

‘The most sought-after properties are selling in days, if not hours, and some sellers are still subjecting would-be buyers to a beauty pageant, dispensing with the usual niceties of offers and counteroffers, and instead jumping straight to “best and finals”. 

‘This means many buyers are still having to be very tactical.’

But despite the record growth, some experts predict that rising interest rates and the increasing cost of living could dampen house price rises in months to come. 

Andrew Montlake, managing director of the UK-wide mortgage broker, Coreco, said: ‘The Herculean performance of the property market in February is being driven by still rampant demand and an unprecedented lack of homes for sale.

‘Don’t expect this pace of growth to continue, though, as there are countless headwinds ahead.

‘Interest rates are set to rise further to contain spiralling inflation, tax hikes are getting ever closer and energy and grocery bills are skyrocketing.

‘Moving forward, it’s likely that people’s borrowing power will wane as lenders take into account these extra costs and that will cause the market to cool down.’

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Culture

European Startup Ecosystems Awash With Gulf Investment – Here Are Some Of The Top Investors

European Startup Ecosystem Getting Flooded With Gulf Investments

The Voice Of EU | In recent years, European entrepreneurs seeking capital infusion have widened their horizons beyond the traditional American investors, increasingly turning their gaze towards the lucrative investment landscape of the Gulf region. With substantial capital reservoirs nestled within sovereign wealth funds and corporate venture capital entities, Gulf nations have emerged as compelling investors for European startups and scaleups.

According to comprehensive data from Dealroom, the influx of investment from Gulf countries into European startups soared to a staggering $3 billion in 2023, marking a remarkable 5x surge from the $627 million recorded in 2018.

This substantial injection of capital, accounting for approximately 5% of the total funding raised in the region, underscores the growing prominence of Gulf investors in European markets.

Particularly noteworthy is the significant support extended to growth-stage companies, with over two-thirds of Gulf investments in 2023 being directed towards funding rounds exceeding $100 million. This influx of capital provides a welcome boost to European companies grappling with the challenge of securing well-capitalized investors locally.

Delving deeper into the landscape, Sifted has identified the most active Gulf investors in European startups over the past two years.

Leading the pack is Aramco Ventures, headquartered in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Bolstered by a substantial commitment, Aramco Ventures boasts a $1.5 billion sustainability fund, alongside an additional $4 billion allocated to its venture capital arm, positioning it as a formidable player with a total investment capacity of $7 billion by 2027. With a notable presence in 17 funding rounds, Aramco Ventures has strategically invested in ventures such as Carbon Clean Solutions and ANYbotics, aligning with its focus on businesses that offer strategic value.

Following closely is Mubadala Capital, headquartered in Abu Dhabi, UAE, with an impressive tally of 13 investments in European startups over the past two years. Backed by the sovereign wealth fund Mubadala Investment Company, Mubadala Capital’s diverse investment portfolio spans private equity, venture capital, and alternative solutions. Notable investments include Klarna, TIER, and Juni, reflecting its global investment strategy across various sectors.

Ventura Capital, based in Dubai, UAE, secured its position as a key player with nine investments in European startups. With a presence in Dubai, London, and Tokyo, Ventura Capital boasts an international network of limited partners and a sector-agnostic investment approach, contributing to its noteworthy investments in companies such as Coursera and Spotify.

Qatar Investment Authority, headquartered in Doha, Qatar, has made significant inroads into the European startup ecosystem with six notable investments. As the sovereign wealth fund of Qatar, QIA’s diversified portfolio spans private and public equity, infrastructure, and real estate, with strategic investments in tech startups across healthcare, consumer, and industrial sectors.

MetaVision Dubai, a newcomer to the scene, has swiftly garnered attention with six investments in European startups. Focusing on seed to Series A startups in the metaverse and Web3 space, MetaVision raised an undisclosed fund in 2022, affirming its commitment to emerging technologies and innovative ventures.

Investcorp, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain, has solidified its presence with six investments in European startups. With a focus on mid-sized B2B businesses, Investcorp’s diverse investment strategies encompass private equity, real estate, infrastructure, and credit management, contributing to its notable investments in companies such as Terra Quantum and TruKKer.

Chimera Capital, based in Abu Dhabi, UAE, rounds off the list with four strategic investments in European startups. As part of a prominent business conglomerate, Chimera Capital leverages its global reach and sector-agnostic approach to drive investments in ventures such as CMR Surgical and Neat Burger.

In conclusion, the burgeoning influx of capital from Gulf investors into European startups underscores the region’s growing appeal as a vibrant hub for innovation and entrepreneurship. With key players such as Aramco Ventures, Mubadala Capital, and Ventura Capital leading the charge, European startups are poised to benefit from the strategic investments and partnerships forged with Gulf investors, propelling them towards sustained growth and success in the global market landscape.


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Culture

Can’t Afford A House In UK? Move To Germany!

Grand Designs star Kevin McCloud has told first time buyers if they can’t afford to buy a house ‘move to Germany’.

The TV presenter advised young people looking to get on the property ladder to abandon their hopes of buying a house in the UK and instead ‘move to another country where the housing market is healthy’.

He told the news website JOE that almost every other North European country and Canada have got ‘really healthy markets, lots of diverse opportunities, lots of diverse offers and it isn’t hugely expensive’.

The 64-year-old said: ‘My advice is move to Germany, maybe that’s the way forward.’

McCloud also took aim at ‘immoral’ housing developers, who he claims now make on average £68,000 profit per house or per flat, compared to 2009, when the figure was ten times less.

Have YOU moved to Germany? Email chris.matthews@mailonline.co.uk

Houses in Germany costs just £232,941 on average. Meanwhile, a pint of beer costs just £2.14 in Germany, while on average in England a pint is £4.21

Houses in Germany costs just £232,941 on average. Meanwhile, a pint of beer costs just £2.14 in Germany, while on average in England a pint is £4.21

Grand Designs star Kevin McCloud who has told first time buyers if they can't afford to buy a house 'move to Germany'

Grand Designs star Kevin McCloud who has told first time buyers if they can’t afford to buy a house ‘move to Germany’

The TV presenter (pictured) advised young people looking to 'move to another country where the housing market is healthy'

The TV presenter (pictured) advised young people looking to ‘move to another country where the housing market is healthy’

First-time buyers purchased 33% of homes sold in the UK so far this year, marking an all-time high

First-time buyers purchased 33% of homes sold in the UK so far this year, marking an all-time high

Houses of a residential area are seen from above in Frankfurt, Germany (File image)

Houses of a residential area are seen from above in Frankfurt, Germany (File image)

McCloud also took aim at 'immoral' housing developers, who he claims now make on average £68,000 profit per house or per flat, compared to 2009, when the figure was ten times less. Pictured: Homes along a street in London (File image)

McCloud also took aim at ‘immoral’ housing developers, who he claims now make on average £68,000 profit per house or per flat, compared to 2009, when the figure was ten times less. Pictured: Homes along a street in London (File image)

He claimed the average profit ‘big housing developers’ now make every time they sell a house or flat was ‘about £68,000’, ten times what it was in 2009.

McCloud added: ‘They’ve shifted their focus from volume and meeting government targets to the profit they deliver to their shareholders.

‘Persimmon, the year before last made £1.1 billion of profit for their shareholders, 25 per cent of their turnover.

‘I’ve only got one word for it and I think it’s immoral.’

Speaking about the state of the UK housing market, McCloud said: ‘I look at the UK market and I see nothing good here.

‘I look at what’s happening in Germany, Holland, Netherlands, Denmark, Scandinavia, I look at other, almost every other North European country and Canada – they’ve got really healthy markets, lots of diverse opportunities, lots of diverse offers and it isn’t hugely expensive.’

Foreigners can buy properties in Germany with relative ease.

Even since Brexit, people from non-EU countries can borrow up to 60 per cent mortgages.

Not all banks offer expats mortgages. DKB and Santander are two that do but having even a temporary residence may improve a person’s chances.

An extensive report by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) concluded that Britain’s development sector is ‘warped by decades of housing market volatility, the departure of local authorities from the housebuilding sphere, and cuts to capital grant that collectively could have insulated the development market from significant shocks’.

The report claims that ‘the UK has both a pro-cyclical housing and development marke’.

The IPPR said: 'Germany has traditionally kept much tighter controls on mortgage lending, meaning that in order to access home ownership, German households have had to save up for longer periods of time than their British counterparts'

The IPPR said: ‘Germany has traditionally kept much tighter controls on mortgage lending, meaning that in order to access home ownership, German households have had to save up for longer periods of time than their British counterparts’

House prices in Germany have historically been far more stable than those in Britain

House prices in Germany have historically been far more stable than those in Britain

England's trend of ownership is in stark contrast to Germany, where many more people rent

England’s trend of ownership is in stark contrast to Germany, where many more people rent

In Germany, the professional sector of people and companies that own property to let it out, is much more invested in the market (37 per cent) than in the UK (18 per cent)

In Germany, the professional sector of people and companies that own property to let it out, is much more invested in the market (37 per cent) than in the UK (18 per cent)

Traditionally, Germany has a much higher rate of housebuilding compared to the UK

Traditionally, Germany has a much higher rate of housebuilding compared to the UK

It added: ‘By contrast, Germany is in a stronger position: its mortgage market has been more tightly regulated and consequently its market (and economy) is less vulnerable to economic downturns; and housing construction is undertaken by a far greater number of actors, including large housebuilders but also, crucially, many smaller, regionally based actors and a significant not-for-profit sector (both within and outside public ownership).

‘The two countries utilise the powers of government in quite different ways. In Germany, although private enterprise is crucial in housing finance, housing development and management of stock, the state, locally and nationally, plays a far more ‘interventionist’ role – in regulation (for instance, of rents and of the mortgage market), in land assembly, and in housing development itself (albeit often through locally owned companies).

‘However, in the UK, although the parameters of policy are set by government, the trend is towards stepping back the role of the state in housing provision, and then becoming active when markets cannot achieve satisfactory outcomes (for instance by providing mortgage guarantees, or through the provision of housing benefit to households unable to afford their rent).’

The latest Nationwide house price index showed house prices fell slightly in March, with a 0.2 per cent decline in the average property value.

The monthly decline was down to seasonal adjustment – which aims to smooth out months that are typically more and less active – whereas the non-adjusted average house price actually rose slightly from £260,420 in February to £261,14 in March.

It means the typical home, according to Nationwide’s data, has edged up 1.6 per cent annually, with headline figures dragged back by southern England’s stuttering property market.

On the same day, Halifax also reported property prices fell in March, reflecting the first monthly fall since September 2023.

The major mortgage lender revealed the average home price fell 1 per cent last month, following five consecutive months of rises.

Despite reports’ focus on headline house price figures, the UK housing market doesn’t just move as one.

A graph showing the average percentage growth in in house prices across the UK

A graph showing the average percentage growth in in house prices across the UK

This map of annual house price changes across the UK shows the North-South divide. House prices are rising in the north and falling in the south

This map of annual house price changes across the UK shows the North-South divide. House prices are rising in the north and falling in the south

It is made up of thousands of local markets that will all be performing differently from one another.

These differences can even be seen at a regional level where there is evidence of a North-South divide opening up. Prices are generally rising in the North and falling in the South.

The average house price during the first three months of 2024 in Northern Ireland, for example, is up 4.6 per cent year-on-year, according to Nationwide.

Prices in Scotland are 3.7 per cent higher over the past three months than they were during the same period in 2023.

And in the North of England the average home is up 4 per cent in the first three months of this year compared to the same period last year.

Prices in the South West are down 1.7 per cent compared to this time last year and prices in East Anglia are 1.3 per cent lower.

Housing experts have claimed that ‘predatory’ investment funds are taking advantage of the British housing market, keeping families paying rent for longer.

There was £1.3billion of private investment in British new builds last year and almost two fifths came from American funds.

Housing expert David Hall told MailOnline: ‘It’s no surprise at all that it’s a business model for a lot of the funds and pension funds and gives them some semblance of certainty and assurance.

‘It is going to price people out of the market. These are investment forums that are essentially vultures. They’re not social housing buddies. They’re not charities. They’re predators.

‘They’re doing nothing wrong. They’re allowed to do it. The market is wide open for predators to come in, wide open for the market to be manipulated.

Housing charity Acorn’s chief Nick Ballard told MailOnline: ‘Britain’s housing crisis should be a source of national shame.

‘Rising homelessness, 1.3 million families on council housing waiting lists and millions condemned to living in poor quality, insecure and expensive private rented accommodation are problems having a very real negative impact on people’s lives, health and on society as a whole.

‘House prices are out of reach for many and have been for years. Rising rents and the cost of living crisis mean people are finding it harder and harder to save to put down a deposit.

‘Policies of successive Governments have led to 1.5 million council houses sold or demolished and not replaced, so these are no longer a viable option for most.

‘House building alone, particularly build-to-rent properties which will siphon money to US investment companies, will not solve the housing crisis.

‘The Government must embark on a serious building programme for social homes, to address the shortage of housing, to bring down rental prices and to provide safe, secure and stable homes that can become the foundation of happy and healthy lives.’

As the average price of a London home nears the £1million mark, thousands of homeowners are ditching the capital.

Have YOU moved to Germany?

Instead of buying in London, homeowners are flocking to more affordable towns that are often in the north of Britain, MailOnline previously revealed.

Schemes like the Help To Buy ISA may have worked a decade ago but since savers can only receive a government bonus if they buy under £450,001, resources such as this have also been priced out.

The average house in the capital costs £733,000 but the average London salary is only £44,000 and most mortgages are capped at 4.5 times that, amounting to just £198,000.

The cheapest place to buy a home is in Middlehaven (TS2), in North Yorkshire, where an average house costs just £49,833.

In fact, Yorkshire postcodes make up the top four cheapest places to buy, with Bradford (BD1), Middlesbrough (TS1) and Brambles Farm (TS3) all coming in with prices under £85,000.

Shildon (DL4), in County Durham is the fifth cheapest, with homes selling for an average of just £86,993.

Linz Darlington, the boss of leasehold extension experts Homehold, told MailOnline: ‘You can seek a better and more affordable quality of life elsewhere.

‘Greater flexibility around working from home has made making a cross-country move more accessible for many.’

Yet while many people are considering leaving the capital, not all postcodes outside of London are as affordable.

In fact, some are even approaching London property prices.

Cobham (KT11), in Surrey, was the most dear, with the average home selling for a shopping £1.4million.

Close behind was Beaconsfield (HP9), in Buckinghamshire, where homes go for £1.3million.

Mr Darlington added: ‘Increasingly buyers are looking for property outside of London and the South East — and so they should be.

‘While these areas may be the preference of many, as a proposition they are clearly overpriced.

‘Leasehold flats have historically been the ”first rung on the ladder” for many house-buyers in London and the South East, but constant woes from cladding issues, outrageous service charges and spiralling ground rents make these an ever less attractive proposition.

‘Issues with flat ownership are compounded by the fact the age of first time buyers has been increasing, which means people are needing for larger, family friendly properties for their first homes.’


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We’re looking at buying a home with a swimming pool – how much would it cost to run?

We’re house hunting in our local area and have found a four-bedroom home with a pool in the garden which is roughly 20ft x 13ft, with a deep end of 6ft.

This £700,000 house ticks many boxes for us, but a swimming pool wasn’t a box to be ticked.

We have two young children, so a swimming pool might be a good feature – but we’re worried about running costs.

Money pit? A This is Money reader wants to know how much a swimming pool costs to maintain (file image)

Money pit? A This is Money reader wants to know how much a swimming pool costs to maintain (file image)

How much would it roughly cost to run all year round in terms of heating and regular maintenance, such as being chlorinated and cleaned?

It also doesn’t currently have a cover. How much roughly would it cost to have a top-of-the-range automatic cover so we could use it all year round?

The other option would be simply to fill it. Would that be a wise move, or would it instantly devalue the home?

We’re also not sure what that entails or how much it would cost to do. Any advice would be appreciated.

Jane Denton replies: You have shown me the house you are looking to buy in Essex and it does look rather fabulous for the price. 

However, taking on a house with a sizeable pool, particularly when you have two young children, is not to be taken lightly. 

If you plan to buy the property and keep the pool, as you rightly point out, there are multiple maintenance costs to consider. Swimming pools can be money pits. 

Taking just some examples, an appropriate pH and chlorine level has to be maintained, the floor of the pool will need vacuuming and the filtration system needs to be checked and serviced regularly. 

Skimming would become part of your daily vocabulary. 

There’s also the additional energy and water costs of running a swimming pool to factor in, which can be substantial.

Safety will be paramount, so it’s sensible that you don’t plan to scrimp on a decent automatic cover.

Another possibility would be, as you state, to get the pool filled in. 

You’ll need to carefully assess how much the pool would realistically be used all year round and consider whether or not the benefits would outweigh the costs and hassle involved. 

Fill in time? Filling in a pool can be expensive, but help save costs in the long run

Fill in time? Filling in a pool can be expensive, but help save costs in the long run 

Pete Simpson, of Pete The Poolman in Surrey, says: Buying a property with a swimming pool can be an exciting prospect. They are appealing and, in theory, make a great addition to a home. 

However, once you’ve moved in and lived with a swimming pool for a while, the reality isn’t always quite as good. 

As a starting point, before you buy the house it would be a good idea, if the seller agrees to it, for you to get an expert to take a look at the swimming pool. 

Pool expert Pete Simpson

Pool expert Pete Simpson

They will be able to tell you whether, for instance, there are any leaks, if the electrics comply with required standards and the condition and type of heating equipment on site. 

Getting problems like this sorted out can be expensive. 

Finding and repairing leaks can cost thousands of pounds. It’s worth knowing what you are buying before taking the plunge. 

In terms of future costs potentially involved, having a swimming pool is like owning a boat, only the water is on the inside.

Heating a pool of the size you are looking at with a modern gas heater for a season without a cover would cost approximately £100 per week, but this would be considerably less with a cover fitted. 

Heating costs vary depending on the outside temperature and the required pool temperature.

Getting a heat pump is another option. These can be pricey and cost thousands of pounds to purchase. 

They require the pool to be covered and ideally need an ambient air temperature of 12 degrees or more to work effectively and reach a comfortable swimming temperature. 

On top of heating costs, running the electric pool circulation pump for a summer season would cost approximately £1,000. 

Some pool owners choose to run the circulation pump for limited spells of time. However, I don’t think this is a good idea. It’s false economy. 

First, the heating can only operate with the pump running, so you lose precious heat during the pump’s downtime. Second, the pool would require more help from chemicals to retain water quality. 

The swimming pool that comes with the house you are considering buying doesn’t come with a cover. 

A good quality ‘walk on’ hydraulic automatic pool cover could potentially set you back as much as £25,000 for a top-of-the-range one, though some less expensive alternatives are available. 

A manual roller or blanket cover could cost a mere £2,000 or so, with the latter offering good heat retention, but, in my view, no safety for children or pets. 

Pools need chlorinating and cleaning regularly. 

Depending on your choice of sanitiser, you should allow at least £100 a month for this. 

The pool would also need to be closed up professionally for the cold winter months and opened in the spring in the same manner. 

If you choose to keep the pool, a good weekly routine service and maintenance schedule would be the best way forward, and maybe a a pay as you enter turnstile for all the new friends you acquire when the mercury rises.

Weekly service charges vary from company to company, but anything from say £55 to £75 per week, excluding chemicals, would be reasonable.

You may decide that the best option for your family would be to get the pool filled in. Prices vary, but getting this done can cost thousands. 

For a start, the pool would have to be broken up at the bottom and along the sides. 

The walls would have to be taken down over a metre to allow for landscaping. A rough guide for the pool with the home you are looking to buy would be around £20,000 and possibility a lot more if there isn’t access for machinery.

In essence, a pool is an expensive toy that will be enjoyed for a handful of days in the summer and is a wonderful garden ornament which will impress any guests.  

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