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New York’s Steinway Tower is the newest and skinniest skyscraper, writes TOM LEONARD 

It was Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, who ordained ‘you can never be too rich or too thin’. She was talking about women, but it increasingly seems she might have been referring to skyscrapers.

A battle of multi-millionaire one-upmanship created Manhattan’s skyline and its new addition once again takes the breath away. More than a quarter of a mile high but no more than 60 ft wide, the Steinway Tower, which has opened for residents, isn’t just exceptionally tall, it is almost painfully thin.

And to live there you have to have the sums that even the Duchess probably never imagined. 

It’s not only one of the tallest buildings in the western world; with a height-to-width ratio of 24:1 (that is, 24 times taller than it is wide), it is the world’s skinniest skyscraper. ‘These are not the proportions of a classical column but of a coffee stirrer,’ a critic sniped.

Here, Tom Leonard offers a bird’s eye view of the latest must-have for those living the high life . . . 

More than a quarter of a mile high but no more than 60 ft wide, the Steinway Tower, which has opened for residents, isn’t just exceptionally tall, it is almost painfully thin

More than a quarter of a mile high but no more than 60 ft wide, the Steinway Tower, which has opened for residents, isn’t just exceptionally tall, it is almost painfully thin

It’s not only one of the tallest buildings in the western world; with a height-to-width ratio of 24:1 (that is, 24 times taller than it is wide), it is the world’s skinniest skyscraper

It’s not only one of the tallest buildings in the western world; with a height-to-width ratio of 24:1 (that is, 24 times taller than it is wide), it is the world’s skinniest skyscraper

Pictured: Interior views of a luxury unit at Steinway Towers, 111 West 57th Street, New York. The pool inside the tower's luxe amenity suite

Pictured: Interior views of a luxury unit at Steinway Towers, 111 West 57th Street, New York. The pool inside the tower’s luxe amenity suite

Pictured: A view of the New York cityscape from inside the skyscraper, which overlooks Central Park

Pictured: A view of the New York cityscape from inside the skyscraper, which overlooks Central Park

View from the Gods   

To the casual eye, the 1,428-foot, 84-floor condominium may look like a deathtrap, liable with the first high wind to come crashing into Central Park or at least wobble so violently that if you weren’t already suffering from altitude sickness, you would almost certainly soon be feeling seasick.

But these ‘pencil towers’ are the new ultra-prestige dwelling for the world’s richest people.

The Steinway (named after the 1925 headquarters of the Steinway & Sons piano company at its base) is particularly desirable — or so its owners hope — in being so narrow that each apartment covers at least one floor and so affords all-round panoramic views. In fact, there are 84 floors but only 46 apartments.

These ‘pencil towers’ are the new ultra-prestige dwelling for the world’s richest people

These ‘pencil towers’ are the new ultra-prestige dwelling for the world’s richest people

The tower stands at 1,428 feet (435 meters) tall, making it one of the largest buildings in the western hemisphere, and the third tallest in New York City

The tower stands at 1,428 feet (435 meters) tall, making it one of the largest buildings in the western hemisphere, and the third tallest in New York City

The Steinway, which reportedly cost £1.5 billion ($2 billion) to build, sits almost midway along the southern border of Central Park on a stretch so full of high-rise residential blocks with sky-scraping price tags that it’s been dubbed Billionaires’ Row

The Steinway, which reportedly cost £1.5 billion ($2 billion) to build, sits almost midway along the southern border of Central Park on a stretch so full of high-rise residential blocks with sky-scraping price tags that it’s been dubbed Billionaires’ Row

And those views — impressive near the bottom, heart-stopping at the top — could hardly be bettered from the sort of building that needs to be cleared with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Steinway, which reportedly cost £1.5 billion ($2 billion) to build, sits almost midway along the southern border of Central Park on a stretch so full of high-rise residential blocks with sky-scraping price tags that it’s been dubbed Billionaires’ Row. Look north and you have the famous park, south and you can see the length of high-rise Manhattan.

Manhattan’s Slim Pickings 

New York’s skyscrapers — including the Empire State Building and One World Trade Center (the replacement for the Twin Towers destroyed in the 9/11 attacks) — usually catch the eye because of their design. But, nowadays, the defining characteristic of the new pretenders is slimness.

The trend for super-thin skyscrapers started in 1970s Hong Kong, an island short of space, and took hold in New York after the millennium.

The Steinway Tower has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it the 'most slender skyscraper in the world' and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

The Steinway Tower has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it the ‘most slender skyscraper in the world’ and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

Pictured: The Steinway Tower is seen in the background as bikers and a horse and carriage make their way through Central Park on April 8

Pictured: The Steinway Tower is seen in the background as bikers and a horse and carriage make their way through Central Park on April 8

Steinway Tower, the world's skinniest skyscraper is seen on April 8, 2022 which has opened to residents in New York City, United States (pictured)

Steinway Tower, the world’s skinniest skyscraper is seen on April 8, 2022 which has opened to residents in New York City, United States (pictured)

Pictured: The sun reflects off the windows of Central Park Tower next to One 57 and the Steinway Tower and 220 Central Park South on Billionaires' Row

Pictured: The sun reflects off the windows of Central Park Tower next to One 57 and the Steinway Tower and 220 Central Park South on Billionaires’ Row

Slenderness is an engineering term and is generally applied to skyscrapers with a minimum width-to-height ratio of 1:10. However, a building’s ‘slenderness ratio’ is often difficult to calculate because the bases and towers are often different widths as the buildings rise.

In New York, their design is partly a response to planning laws. These restrict the amount of land that can be built on in an area and also the height — or ‘air rights’ — of any building.

But a loophole in the rules means developers can buy a parcel of land, then buy unused air rights from adjacent plots — including from buildings shorter than their allowed maximum — and stack these to build a tall but thin tower.

Technological advances have contributed to the rise of the ‘skinnies’, as has the fact that, in a crowded market, for good or ill they tend to get noticed. 

Pictured: The skyline is seen, featuring the Steinway Tower which has opened for residents in New York

Pictured: The skyline is seen, featuring the Steinway Tower which has opened for residents in New York

Naughty Neighbours?  

Who buys these apartments? Well, often very rich people who live abroad and are looking for investment opportunities. 

The tragedy of many recently built New York skyscrapers in a city where millions struggle to find affordable housing is that so many apartments aren’t occupied, their owners — many in China — buying them as speculative investments.

In Billionaires’ Row (where the New York Times estimated in 2019 that 40 per cent of apartments remained unsold) oligarchs have been especially well-represented.

The trend for super-thin skyscrapers started in 1970s Hong Kong, an island short of space, and took hold in New York after the millennium. Pictured:  The outside architecture of Steinway Towers

The trend for super-thin skyscrapers started in 1970s Hong Kong, an island short of space, and took hold in New York after the millennium. Pictured:  The outside architecture of Steinway Towers

But rich Russians are nowadays as welcome in New York as vodka at a Temperance Society meeting. Which is a pity given that, if anyone welcomed the Steinway Tower’s 360-degree views, it would be the sort of dodgy businessman who wants as much warning as possible of anyone coming to arrest him.

Hollywood star Jennifer Lopez bought a home at another similarly obtrusive pencil tower at 432 Park Avenue, but the identity of other buyers continues to be hidden in shell companies registered in tax havens.

In five years, new developments on 57th Street have registered 41 residential transactions over $25 million, at an average sales price of $38.5 million. 

In five years, new developments on 57th Street have registered 41 residential transactions over $25 million, at an average sales price of $38.5 million. Pictured: The New York Skyscrapers, featuring The Steinway Tower

In five years, new developments on 57th Street have registered 41 residential transactions over $25 million, at an average sales price of $38.5 million. Pictured: The New York Skyscrapers, featuring The Steinway Tower 

High-life Horrors 

Studies have suggested there’s a glut in the market for these homes, with many remaining unsold for long periods of time.

For the view from the top of a pencil tower isn’t entirely cloud-free — they don’t have the greatest customer satisfaction record.

It’s long been accepted that super-tall, super-skinny skyscrapers will move significantly in a brisk wind (experiencing this for the first time can be unnerving and even nausea-inducing, although you tend to get used to it).

Pictured: Vertical view of Manhattan's westside, featuring the Steinway Tower and Central Park Tower at sunset

Pictured: Vertical view of Manhattan’s westside, featuring the Steinway Tower and Central Park Tower at sunset

Experts say problems arise when, for reasons of cost, time or incompetence, architects and builders don’t factor this movement into their calculations on everything from walls to plumbing. If hit by high winds, tall skyscrapers can bend by as much as 3 ft.

The developers of 432 Park Avenue, which is 1,396 ft tall, have been accused of failing in this regard by residents who are suing for $125 million, citing 1,500 construction and design defects, many of them allegedly potentially lethal.

Visitors to the penthouse reported feeling ‘super-nauseated’ because of the swaying, and the building has suffered flooding, reportedly due to faulty plumbing, while the wails from its multi-millionaire occupants make clear they weren’t ready for a home that creaks ‘like the galley of a ship’. Experts are concerned other pencil towers will face the same nightmares.

The fact is, life at the top isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

At the bottom of the tower, the first five floors are taken up by expensive shops and recreation spaces including an 82 ft swimming pool, private dining room and double-height fitness centre. Amenities include a 24-hour concierge and doorman (which sadly still doesn’t beat a smaller downtown rival that offers residents a concierge private jet service). Pictured: The Steinway Tower in the New York skyline

At the bottom of the tower, the first five floors are taken up by expensive shops and recreation spaces including an 82 ft swimming pool, private dining room and double-height fitness centre. Amenities include a 24-hour concierge and doorman (which sadly still doesn’t beat a smaller downtown rival that offers residents a concierge private jet service). Pictured: The Steinway Tower in the New York skyline 

Nuisance to normal New Yorkers  

At the Steinway, the ‘cheapest’ studio flat costs £6 million ($7.75 million) and the prices soar up to more than £50.7 million ($66 million) for the penthouse. The latter — stretching over three floors connected by an oval staircase — provides 7,130 sq ft of interior space.

It includes four bedrooms, five bathrooms, 14 ft high ceilings, a private lift and a hand-made nickel bathtub created by British designer William Holland. The penthouse was bought by an international buyer who snapped it up after only taking a virtual tour.

At the bottom of the tower, the first five floors are taken up by expensive shops and recreation spaces including an 82 ft swimming pool, private dining room and double-height fitness centre. Amenities include a 24-hour concierge and doorman (which sadly still doesn’t beat a smaller downtown rival that offers residents a concierge private jet service).

The Steinway building’s mainly glass facade includes blocks of bronzed terracotta so the tower will change colour at different times and from different angles. Pictured: Billionaire's Row in the background including the Steinway Tower as people sunbathe on August 23

The Steinway building’s mainly glass facade includes blocks of bronzed terracotta so the tower will change colour at different times and from different angles. Pictured: Billionaire’s Row in the background including the Steinway Tower as people sunbathe on August 23 

The Steinway building’s mainly glass facade includes blocks of bronzed terracotta so the tower will change colour at different times and from different angles.

The tower, which tapers strikingly up to its tip, was designed by New York architecture firm SHoP Architects to evoke the Art Deco age during which so many of the city’s greatest skyscrapers went up, and took from 2013 to 2021 to build. Its designers hail it as ‘a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur’. 

Other New Yorkers are more likely to hail it as yet another hideous monument to the vanity, arrogance and general excess of the world’s super-rich. The Steinway and Billionaires’ Row cast a lengthening shadow over the southern end of Central Park, which for many Manhattanites is their only recreational outdoor space.

Not content to look down on everyone, the pencil tower brigade wants everyone to notice that they’re looking down on them. Or so it might seem to poorer New Yorkers squinting up from down below.    

The tower, which tapers strikingly up to its tip, was designed by New York architecture firm SHoP Architects to evoke the Art Deco age during which so many of the city’s greatest skyscrapers went up, and took from 2013 to 2021 to build. Its designers hail it as ‘a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur’

The tower, which tapers strikingly up to its tip, was designed by New York architecture firm SHoP Architects to evoke the Art Deco age during which so many of the city’s greatest skyscrapers went up, and took from 2013 to 2021 to build. Its designers hail it as ‘a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur’

Steinway Hall: Centre of the piano universe 

German-American piano company Steinway & Sons was founded in New York City in 1853 by German piano builder Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg.

The company, which has factories in both New York City and Hamburg, Germany, has been manufacturing and showcasing pianos in the city – and around the world – ever since.

Steinway & Sons opened their piano showroom at Steinway Hall, once known as the ‘center of the piano universe,’ on West 57th Street in 1925.

The building, designed by the architects responsible for Grand Central Terminal, sat across from Carnegie Hall.

The building – which featured a reception room, salesrooms, and a recital hall seating 240, as well as executive offices and music studios – served as a beacon in the art world. Some of the greatest known pianists in the world performed at the facility. 

Steinway & Sons sold the location in 2015, resulting in the development of the luxury apartment complex that several Manhattan residents now call home. 

 

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We need to replace our uPVC double-glazing – should we opt for grey?

Our double-glazing needs replacing in our three-bedroom semi-detached home due to its age. 

We’ve had two quotes for uPVC windows, and have been offered the option of grey anthracite.

On both quotes, grey comes out at around 15 per cent more expensive.

However, I’ve noticed in our local area that many people seem to have gone grey in recent years, rather than the typical white.

Going grey: A This is Money reader wants to know about the pros and cons of grey windows

Going grey: A This is Money reader wants to know about the pros and cons of grey windows 

I do wonder if there is any benefit to going grey, other than them not showing up dirt as much?

Would it add extra value to our home when we come to sell? Or is it simply just an aesthetic choice? 

Jane Denton replies: The ‘greyification’ of home interiors, cars and now windows has been hard to miss in the last few years. 

New-build homes with grey windows can be found springing up all over Britain. 

Plus, buyers purchasing homes which need a fair amount of work doing to them are, in ever growing numbers, opting for grey windows. Some people view grey as chic and contemporary. 

Send us your property question 

We’d love to hear from you if you have a property question and want to find out what the experts have to say on the matter. 

Whether you have neighbour woes, are looking to update or move home, or perhaps you can’t decide how to sort out an extension or make a room look bigger, we want to hear from you.

If you are a prospective first-time buyer or already on the housing ladder and have a property quandary, get in touch.

Email editor@thisismoney.co.uk

Please put PROPERTY in the subject line. 

As you suggest, your decision will boil down to personal choice and key factors like price, durability and aesthetics. 

While grey can hide dirt better than white, grey can sometimes look somewhat dull. 

Perhaps it’s also worth considering is grey is just a passing fad and will look dated in a decade or so – though that won’t bother you if you have moved house by that point.

Grey windows still aren’t the norm, meaning they are generally more expensive than white ones. 

The same goes, for example, for black or sage green windows. 

The exact costs involved will vary depending on the supplier used, the material you go for, the size of window required and whether the windows are double or triple glazed. 

Depending what you plump for, you could expect to pay around 10 to 20 per cent more for grey windows than conventional white uPVC ones. 

Timber and aluminum options can be pricier. 

In most circumstances, you wouldn’t need planning permission to change the windows in the manner you suggest. 

Permitted development rights are likely to apply. However, for a listed building, planning permission would be required.

In terms of what it means for property price and whether they are worth the investment in general, I turned to a property expert.  

Alex Harvey, managing director of Alex Harvey Estate Agents, said: I have seen various trends in windows come and go, however the ones that have always stood out from the crowd are the coloured and textured varieties. 

They seem to add an additional dimension to the look and feel of a property. uPVC windows of any colour can be a good low-maintenance choice. 

Grey windows can also be very practical. They do not show the dirt as much and make more of a statement than conventional white windows. 

It is not just the windows themselves you need to consider. 

Estate agency boss Alex Harvey believes grey windows can add value to a property

Estate agency boss Alex Harvey believes grey windows can add value to a property

It’s essential to have the right furniture and handles on them to compliment the age and style of the property. 

An example of this is where people have chosen black wrought iron monkey tail handles, in place of the usual chrome or even white plastic in an older style property.

In newer style homes, anthracite works really well to frame the windows and tie them into the structure of the home, while using chrome handles to help the rest of the framing stand out.

Windows are not just a way to bring natural light into a home these days, they are an opportunity to frame the view from inside the property by having a textured and coloured surround. 

However, there are mistakes that can occur, the main one can being that there can be too much beading in the window itself, which can take away from the view.

We tell clients considering coming to market about the importance of having their windows free of blown panes or any broken elements. 

Buyers notice these things when looking out of windows to understand the views and the surroundings of the property. 

In terms of whether grey windows add value to a property, it all depends on the quality of the windows and doors and the warranty that’s offered. 

We have had clients who have invested more for windows and doors that have had longer warranties for both their peace of mind and as a selling feature for future owners. 

Without doubt, newly installed windows and doors will improve an Energy Performance Certificate rating and will therefore appeal to a wider range of buyers.

It is not easy to assign an uplift value, over what the windows would cost to install. 

However, I can certainly say that for properties that urgently require new windows and doors to be replaced, buyers often have an understanding of the investment required and can be put off from buying a property that requires this level of improvement.

My gut feel would be a circa 10 per cent uplift if the windows and doors have a good balance of the above, based on the initial investment of the installation.

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Five climb the property ladder! Famous Five-style 17th century manor house with secret room, spyhole and fascinating history goes up for sale for £3.2m

A Famous Five-style manor house with a secret 17th Century ‘panic room’ and tiny spy-hole built into the staircase has gone on sale for £3.2million.

The historic seven-bedroom house started life as a coaching inn just after the English Civil War, but has also been visited by royalty and appeared in a children’s novel.

Among its quirkier features is a secret hiding space dating from more than 300 years ago, which can be accessed via a hidden panel under the stairs, leading to a tiny room beneath. 

Owners could monitor who came to their front door through a tiny spy-hole built into the staircase.

The property at Peppard Common, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, has four reception rooms, more than three acres of wraparound gardens and paddocks and is on the edge of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

A Famous Five-style manor house at Peppard Common, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, with a secret 17th Century 'panic room' and spyhole in the staircase has gone on sale for £3.2million

A Famous Five-style manor house at Peppard Common, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, with a secret 17th Century ‘panic room’ and spyhole in the staircase has gone on sale for £3.2million

One of two dining rooms in the property, which was visited in the early 1900s by the future King Edward VII and his wife, Queen Alexandra

One of two dining rooms in the property, which was visited in the early 1900s by the future King Edward VII and his wife, Queen Alexandra

During the early 1900s it was visited by the future King Edward VII with his wife, Queen Alexandra, when they were the Prince and Princess of Wales

The then owner was a lady-in-waiting to the royal family.

It also featured in The White Witch, a 1958 novel by acclaimed children’s writer Elizabeth Goudge. 

In it she describes her character looking out of the house’s south and east windows saying ‘she could see far over the fields to the sunrise’.

The new owners will still have stunning views, which take in local countryside, as well as the village cricket pitch.

Inside, the house is filled with original features, including wooden panelling in the entrance hall, beamed ceilings, flint walls and leaded light windows.

The property has an entrance hall, kitchen, two dining rooms, family room, lounge, utility and laundry room and boot room on the ground floor with a cellar below.

Upstairs is an open-plan study area, seven bedrooms and two bathrooms.

Outside, the property has around 3.2 acres of wraparound gardens and paddocks and a triple garage with courtyard parking area and a gravel drive.

The owner said: ‘The house itself is steeped in history as it originally dates back to 1688, just a few decades after the Civil War, and interestingly it has a 17th century panic room hidden behind a section of the original wood panelling.

‘There are stories of visits from royalty – it was owned by a lady-in-waiting in the early years of the 20th century – and it featured heavily in a historical novel called The White Witch, written by Elizabeth Goudge who, many years ago, lived on the other side of the common.

A secret 'panic' room dating back more than 300 years has a tiny spy-hole built into the staircase of the historic property

A secret ‘panic’ room dating back more than 300 years has a tiny spy-hole built into the staircase of the historic property

The property has four reception rooms, more than three acres of wraparound gardens and paddocks and is on the edge of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

The property has four reception rooms, more than three acres of wraparound gardens and paddocks and is on the edge of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

‘However, for us it was simply a lovely family home, very spacious and bright, and hugely characterful. 

‘My parents made a number of improvements to it over the years, but there’s definitely lots of scope for the new owners to come in and put their own stamp on it.’

Robert Cable, from Fine & Country, who is handling the sale, said the property belonged to a family of five who had bought it 50 years ago.

He said: ‘They have loved living here and raising their family in this house, it is filled with happy memories, but it’s time for them to move on and pass it to new custodians who will appreciate it as much as they have.

‘It would be perfect for a family that wanted their children to grow up in idyllic rural surroundings.

‘Outside there is so much beautiful space to enjoy, or even keep a pony; inside there is so much space and so many nooks and crannies for children to hide, along with the secret room – it’s like something from the Famous Five novels.’

Inside, the house is filled with original features, including wooden panelling in the entrance hall, beamed ceilings, flint walls and leaded light windows

Inside, the house is filled with original features, including wooden panelling in the entrance hall, beamed ceilings, flint walls and leaded light windows

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European Startup Ecosystems Awash With Gulf Investment – Here Are Some Of The Top Investors

European Startup Ecosystem Getting Flooded With Gulf Investments

The Voice Of EU | In recent years, European entrepreneurs seeking capital infusion have widened their horizons beyond the traditional American investors, increasingly turning their gaze towards the lucrative investment landscape of the Gulf region. With substantial capital reservoirs nestled within sovereign wealth funds and corporate venture capital entities, Gulf nations have emerged as compelling investors for European startups and scaleups.

According to comprehensive data from Dealroom, the influx of investment from Gulf countries into European startups soared to a staggering $3 billion in 2023, marking a remarkable 5x surge from the $627 million recorded in 2018.

This substantial injection of capital, accounting for approximately 5% of the total funding raised in the region, underscores the growing prominence of Gulf investors in European markets.

Particularly noteworthy is the significant support extended to growth-stage companies, with over two-thirds of Gulf investments in 2023 being directed towards funding rounds exceeding $100 million. This influx of capital provides a welcome boost to European companies grappling with the challenge of securing well-capitalized investors locally.

Delving deeper into the landscape, Sifted has identified the most active Gulf investors in European startups over the past two years.

Leading the pack is Aramco Ventures, headquartered in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Bolstered by a substantial commitment, Aramco Ventures boasts a $1.5 billion sustainability fund, alongside an additional $4 billion allocated to its venture capital arm, positioning it as a formidable player with a total investment capacity of $7 billion by 2027. With a notable presence in 17 funding rounds, Aramco Ventures has strategically invested in ventures such as Carbon Clean Solutions and ANYbotics, aligning with its focus on businesses that offer strategic value.

Following closely is Mubadala Capital, headquartered in Abu Dhabi, UAE, with an impressive tally of 13 investments in European startups over the past two years. Backed by the sovereign wealth fund Mubadala Investment Company, Mubadala Capital’s diverse investment portfolio spans private equity, venture capital, and alternative solutions. Notable investments include Klarna, TIER, and Juni, reflecting its global investment strategy across various sectors.

Ventura Capital, based in Dubai, UAE, secured its position as a key player with nine investments in European startups. With a presence in Dubai, London, and Tokyo, Ventura Capital boasts an international network of limited partners and a sector-agnostic investment approach, contributing to its noteworthy investments in companies such as Coursera and Spotify.

Qatar Investment Authority, headquartered in Doha, Qatar, has made significant inroads into the European startup ecosystem with six notable investments. As the sovereign wealth fund of Qatar, QIA’s diversified portfolio spans private and public equity, infrastructure, and real estate, with strategic investments in tech startups across healthcare, consumer, and industrial sectors.

MetaVision Dubai, a newcomer to the scene, has swiftly garnered attention with six investments in European startups. Focusing on seed to Series A startups in the metaverse and Web3 space, MetaVision raised an undisclosed fund in 2022, affirming its commitment to emerging technologies and innovative ventures.

Investcorp, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain, has solidified its presence with six investments in European startups. With a focus on mid-sized B2B businesses, Investcorp’s diverse investment strategies encompass private equity, real estate, infrastructure, and credit management, contributing to its notable investments in companies such as Terra Quantum and TruKKer.

Chimera Capital, based in Abu Dhabi, UAE, rounds off the list with four strategic investments in European startups. As part of a prominent business conglomerate, Chimera Capital leverages its global reach and sector-agnostic approach to drive investments in ventures such as CMR Surgical and Neat Burger.

In conclusion, the burgeoning influx of capital from Gulf investors into European startups underscores the region’s growing appeal as a vibrant hub for innovation and entrepreneurship. With key players such as Aramco Ventures, Mubadala Capital, and Ventura Capital leading the charge, European startups are poised to benefit from the strategic investments and partnerships forged with Gulf investors, propelling them towards sustained growth and success in the global market landscape.


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