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Leaseholders share fury at £450k cost of new intercom system

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Leaseholders at a block of flats in East London have been told they will pay at least £450,000 for a new intercom system – and the cost doesn’t even include any new cables.

What the figure is expected to cover, however, is a fee of at least £34,000 to the leaseholder’s management company called FirstPort.

The management fee alone is more than the average worker’s salary in Britain, which currently stands at £29,900.

The minimum fee being charged by the managing agent for this project will be £34,397.30, based on its contract with the freeholder that allows it to charge 10 per cent of the cost of major works before VAT.

Leaseholders at a block of flats in East London, including Liam Spender, pictured, have been told they will have to pay at least £450,000 for a new intercom system

Leaseholders at a block of flats in East London, including Liam Spender, pictured, have been told they will have to pay at least £450,000 for a new intercom system 

Leaseholder Liam Spender, who owns one of the flats in the development, estimated his share of the works to be £1,138.50.  

Residents have questioned why if there is no rewiring being done, does the system need replacing? 

One of the benefits is that the new system will eventually ‘save’ leaseholders money longer term, as the current intercom system is rented.

The existing intercom system at the block of flats is rented from a company called Countryside Communications.

It installed the rental system at the time the developer St. George – now part of Berkeley Group – built the development in 2000.  

Mr Spender said: ‘They are handing over more than £100,000 of our money to Countryside with no questions asked. Berkeley Group has a lot to answer for here as well.’

‘I’m worried because we have cladding issues here as well, another mess Berkeley Group left us to clean up. If FirstPort is milking us over a relatively small project, I dread to think what it will be like when they are in charge of potentially millions of pounds of cladding remediation spending.’

Countryside Communications’ contract should have expired in July last year, but it has been allowed to roll over.

Countryside billed £282,935.11 in rental fees in 2019 and 2020, and between 2016 and 2020, it has billed more than £700,000 in rental fees for the existing system.

The 2020 rental price works out at roughly £325 per flat per year. 

The replacement system is believed to cost about £46 per flat per year, and so residents will eventually save money with the new system.

The £450,000 cost of the new intercom system does not include new cables, but does cover the replacement of existing 'plates' (pictured)

The £450,000 cost of the new intercom system does not include new cables, but does cover the replacement of existing ‘plates’ (pictured)

However, the equivalent of 18 months of those savings are required to pay off FirstPort’s fee and Countryside’s exit charge.

As part of the £450,000, a figure of £112,246 is being paid to Countryside Communications in exchange for the 20-odd year old cable. The new system will be installed on the back of the existing cable.

As part of its 10 per cent fee, FirstPort is collecting 10 per cent of the £112,246 payment to Countryside. In other words, it is going to charge residents the equivalent of £11,224.60 for effectively paying an invoice.

The cost to leaseholders like Mr Spender (pictured) includes a fee of at least £34,000 to the leaseholder's management company FirstPort

The cost to leaseholders like Mr Spender (pictured) includes a fee of at least £34,000 to the leaseholder’s management company FirstPort

The estimated cost of the works is £454,044.36. This cost will be spread across 436 flats in the block. 

Both Berkeley Group and Countryside Communications were approached for comment, but did not respond.

However, a Firstport spokesman said: ‘Proposed improvement works at St David’s Square are to upgrade the existing door entry system. This is a major works programme, which comes outside of normal day-to-day maintenance costs, and legally requires a Section 20 process to be completed. 

‘At this stage in the process, any costs communicated are an estimate and we are continuing to work through the Section 20 consultation so we can confirm exact costs.

‘In our role as property manager, we are supporting homeowners and residents to get this upgrade completed whilst ensuring the costs of these works, and disruption to residents, are kept to a minimum. 

‘We do charge a fee as part of the major works process to cover our time managing the Section 20 consultation and the procurement process, which includes running a tender process and obtaining competitive quotes from qualified suppliers for the work, as well as coordinating the subsequent works on-site and communicating with our customers throughout.’

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Lidl to open new store in Billingshurst (GB)

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Dunmoore has signed a forward-funding agreement with CBRE Investment Management for the development of a Lidl supermarket in Billingshurst Business Park, Sussex. CBRE Investment Management is paying €10m (£8.4m) for the 20,451ft² store. Lidl has agreed a 25-year lease at a rent of €430,558 (£360,000) a year with the option to break at years 15 and 20. Development of the store will now commence with a view to opening in June 2022, initiating the second phase of development at the business park that will provide 250,000ft² of industrial and business space accommodation. The superstore will also sit alongside a recently completed petrol filling station and two drive-thru offerings, all providing excellent service for the business park.

 

Jeff Hobby, CEO and owner of Dunmoore, said: “This forward-funding agreement with CBRE Investment Management reflects the strength of the market for long-term, index-linked, blue-chip income. The progress we have made with the development in such challenging times has been excellent and this deal is a testament to our understanding of the ever-changing market and requirements. With continued high levels of demand, we look forward to providing further modern flexible business space for the local area”.

 

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Rents rise at fastest rate on record, says Rightmove

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Rents are rising at the fastest rate on record and now outpace house price increases in most areas of the country, new data has revealed.

It is the latest evidence of challenges people face trying to find somewhere to live. 

High demand among tenants and low supply of good rental homes means there is fierce competition in this part of the property market.

The South West has seen some of the highest rental growth and this four-bed detached house in Frome, Somerset, is for rent for £1,700 a month via Cooper and Tanner letting agents

The South West has seen some of the highest rental growth and this four-bed detached house in Frome, Somerset, is for rent for £1,700 a month via Cooper and Tanner letting agents

Rightmove revealed that rents rose 9.9 per cent to £1,068 a month on average outside of London

Rightmove revealed that rents rose 9.9 per cent to £1,068 a month on average outside of London

Rightmove said that rents had outpaced house price increases in all but three regions in Britain.

It looked at asking rents on its website across Britain and found that they rose 9.9 per cent to reach £1,068 a month on average outside of London.

It is the highest annual jump on record and highlights the recovery in rental growth following a slowdown in the months immediately after the pandemic started.

High demand among tenants and a low supply of rental properties has led to rents outpacing house price increases, Rightmove said in its quarterly report.

The only regions where rental growth has not outstripped the rise in house prices are the East Midlands, the South West and the South East.

However, the South West is still included in the areas with the biggest rises in rental values, up 11 per cent. There is also Wales, up 12.7 per cent, and the North West, up 12.5 per cent.

The data compared the last three months of last year with the same period a year earlier.

Inner London rents grew at a record 16.2 per cent and this one-bed flat at the Battersea Power Station development is for rent for £2,000 a month via Daniel Ford letting agents

Inner London rents grew at a record 16.2 per cent and this one-bed flat at the Battersea Power Station development is for rent for £2,000 a month via Daniel Ford letting agents

GROWTH IN AVERAGE RENTS IN DIFFERENT REGIONS ACROSS BRITAIN
Average asking rent Q4 2021 Average asking rent Q3 2021 QoQ Average asking rent Q4 2020 YoY
East Midlands £935 £925 1.1% £857 9.0%
East of England £1,313 £1,289 1.9% £1,196 9.7%
London £2,142 £2,019 6.1% £1,932 10.9%
North East £718 £699 2.6% £662 8.4%
North West £924 £899 2.7% £821 12.5%
Scotland £826 £805 2.6% £772 7.0%
South East £1,514 £1,489 1.7% £1,379 9.8%
South West £1,180 £1,154 2.3% £1,063 11.0%
Wales £874 £846 3.3% £775 12.7%
West Midlands £941 £918 2.4% £871 8.1%
Yorkshire and The Humber £830 £812 2.2% £759 9.3%
Source: Rightmove         

London saw record annual growth of 10.9 per cent, with asking rents in the capital standing 3 per cent higher than before the start of the pandemic. It is the first time they have risen beyond pre-pandemic levels.

At the end of 2020, London recorded a near-record 6.4 per cent drop in average asking rents as demand shifted away from the capital during another lockdown.

Tenants looked for more space outside of cities, particularly away from flats, while landlords offered tenants willing to stay cut-price rents.

By the end of 2021, London rents were higher than before the pandemic started, as its popularity returned and landlords were able to negotiate higher rents for the new year.

Inner London rents also grew at a record 16.2 per cent, recovering from its drop of 14 per cent at the beginning of 2021, to also rise just ahead of pre-pandemic levels for the first time.

Pontypool in Monmouthshire, Wales, saw the largest increase in asking rents of any local area, up 20 per cent from £562 a month to £674 a month.

It is followed by Ascot, Berkshire, which is up 18.8 per cent and Littlehampton, West Sussex, up 17.5 per cent.

High rental growth was also seen in the East Midlands and this four-bed house in Leicester is for rent for £1,350 a month via Corley letting agents

High rental growth was also seen in the East Midlands and this four-bed house in Leicester is for rent for £1,350 a month via Corley letting agents

RISE IN AVERAGE HOUSE PRICES IN DIFFERENT REGIONS OF BRITAIN
Region Average asking price % YOY
East Midlands £266,725 10.4%
East of England £396,135 8.4%
London £629,286 4.2%
North East £165,277 6.0%
North West £228,866 8.8%
Scotland £162,415 2.8%
South East £450,918 10.2%
South West £359,201 11.6%
Wales £230,813 9.9%
West Midlands £262,825 7.6%
Yorkshire and The Humber £214,988 6.1%
Source: Rightmove     

The imbalance between high tenant demand and low rental stock has also led to competition between tenants for rental homes nearly doubling, up 94 per cent compared to the same period last year.

Total rental demand is up 32 per cent compared to this time last year, while the number of available rental properties is 51 per cent lower. 

It led to available rental properties being snapped up by tenants, in just 17 days on average.

However, Rightmove went on to say that the number of available rental properties is 7 per cent higher than the same period in December, a sign of availability improving at the start of the year.

Flats have seen the highest increase in competition compared to last year, up 132 per cent, followed by terraced houses, up 40 per cent, and semi-detached homes, up 30 per cent.

Rightmove also revealed that the average rental yield across Britain is 5.5 per cent, which is the highest level since 2016 when it was 5.6 per cent.

The North East and Wales have hit record yields, while yields in London, South West and Yorkshire are at their highest since 2015.

Yields in the East of England and South East are at their highest since 2016.

Rightmove also revealed that the average rental yield across Britain is 5.5 per cent

Rightmove also revealed that the average rental yield across Britain is 5.5 per cent

TOP AVERAGE RENTAL YIELDS IN BRITAIN
Area Region Average yield 2020 Average yield 2021 Difference in yields 2021 vs 2020
Preston North West 6.1% 9.1% 3.1%
Exeter South West 6.0% 8.8% 2.7%
Swansea Wales 9.0% 11.2% 2.2%
Nottingham East Midlands 8.2% 10.3% 2.1%
Rushcliffe East Midlands 5.6% 7.7% 2.1%
Renfrewshire Scotland 8.1% 9.9% 1.8%
Gwynedd Wales 9.3% 11.0% 1.7%
Rhondda Cynon Taf Wales 7.6% 9.1% 1.5%
Warwick West Midlands 5.9% 7.3% 1.5%
East Ayrshire Scotland 8.3% 9.7% 1.4%
Source: Rightmove       

Tim Bannister, from Rightmove, said: ‘The year 2020 was defined by the race for space outside of cities, as tenant priorities changed and many moved further out looking for a larger property with green space, or temporarily moved back in with family. 

‘London was perhaps the biggest example of this, where landlords significantly decreased asking rents by the end of the year to encourage tenants to stay in the capital. 

‘A year on, asking rents have finally risen beyond pre-pandemic levels, a sign that the capital has not lost its pull and popularity with renters as landlords look to renegotiate previous cut-price terms.’

He continued: ‘Tenant demand continues to be really high entering the new year, meaning the imbalance between supply and demand is set to continue until more choice comes onto the market for tenants, which has led to our prediction of a further 5 per cent increase in average asking rents in 2022. 

‘Landlords understand the importance of having a good, long-term tenant, and there is a limit to what renters can afford to pay, which will prevent rents rising at the same rate we’ve seen over the past year.’

Marc von Grundherr, of letting agents Benham and Reeves, said: ‘The London rental market is drastically different to that seen in 2020 when landlords were forced to heavily reduce asking rents to secure a tenant and avoid lengthy void periods due to an exodus of market activity from the capital.

‘In fact, the surplus of available rental stock that accumulated due to the pandemic has now plummeted and this has been driven by a staggered return to the workplace and, in particular, a huge influx of demand from overseas students.

‘We’ve also seen a huge increase in the number of tenancy renewals which have even exceeded 2019 levels and so while some areas are yet to see rental values return to the pre-pandemic norm, it’s only a matter of time as the market looks set to continue to this strong return to form throughout 2022.’

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Taoiseach to attend Bloody Sunday memorial service in Derry

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The Taoiseach is to lay a wreath at the memorial to those killed on Bloody Sunday during a service in Derry to mark the 50th anniversary of the atrocity. Micheál Martin is also expected to meet privately with the families of those killed, The Irish Times understands.

Minister for Foreign Affairs, Simon Coveney, is also due to attend the ceremony on Sunday morning, as will other church leaders and politicians including the Sinn Féin president Mary Lou McDonald, vice president and the North’s Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill, and the SDLP leader Colum Eastwood.

President Michael D Higgins will deliver a virtual address at an event in Guildhall Square on Sunday afternoon.

Thirteen people died when members of the British Army’s Parachute Regiment opened fire on an anti-internment march in the city on January 30th, 1972. A fourteenth died later.

John Kelly, whose 17-year-old brother Michael was among the victims, said the Taoiseach would be welcomed by the Bloody Sunday families and it “shows the depth of feeling that the Irish Government has for the families who have witnessed and endured the suffering of Bloody Sunday for five decades.

“It’s a nice tribute from the Irish Government and the people of Ireland and certainly will be welcomed by the families and the people of Derry,” he said.

In the House of Commons on Wednesday, Mr Eastwood, the MP for Foyle, condemned the flying of Parachute Regiment flags which have appeared on the outskirts of Derry ahead of the anniversary and asked the Northern Secretary, Brandon Lewis, if he felt the regiment should “apologise for and condemn the actions of their soldiers on Bloody Sunday?”

In a post on social media, the Parachute regiment criticised the flying of the flags, describing it as “totally unacceptable and disrespectful behaviour.”

It has been condemned by both nationalist and unionist politicians and by relatives of the victims. Mr Kelly said they were “offensive to families and offensive to the people of Derry” and he called on community leaders in those areas and on unionist politicians to have them removed.

The DUP Assembly member for Foyle, the junior minister Gary Middleton, said the flags were “unnecessary and designed to be offensive” and the flags should be removed.

Responding to Mr Eastwood in the Commons, Mr Lewis said “we, as the Government, have to accept responsibility for what has happened in the past. When things are wrong we need to be clear about that, as we have been. It’s right that we have apologised for that.

“I’ve added my own personal apology to the government’s,” he said.

In a statement to the Commons earlier Mr Lewis acknowledged the upcoming 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday and the apology from the then prime minister, David Cameron, and said his “thoughts this weekend will be with all those affected”.

Referring to UK government’s new proposals for dealing with the legacy of the Troubles, he said it was engaging intensively and widely and “reflecting carefully on what we have heard.”

In a statement to The Irish Times on Wednesday, a spokesman for the UK ministry of defence said it did “not condone in any way” the “misuse” of flags, which should be “used only in an official capacity.”

He said that following the publication of the Saville Report into Bloody Sunday in 2010 “the Chief of General Staff (Gen Sir David Richards) fully supported the prime minister’s apology on behalf of the government of the United Kingdom, the army and those involved and this remains the army’s position.”

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