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India’s government asks court to block WhatsApp’s policy update

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The messaging app postponed its policy changes in January and officials remain unconvinced that the changes are permissible.

WhatsApp’s planned policy changes have hit another snag with India moving to block the company from implementing the updates.

As reported by TechCrunch, officials have claimed that WhatsApp’s policy update – due to take effect on 15 May – violates local laws.

The claims were made in a filing to a court in Delhi, asking the court to block the company from changing the policy.

Information collected by social media is “susceptible to being misused if the social media giant decides to either sell or exploit the information, sensitive to the users, to any third party,” the filing said.

It is the latest move from India which joined a chorus of critics in January that took issue with the Facebook-owned messaging app’s planned updated to its privacy policy.

There was much backlash internationally against the changes over how data may be shared between WhatsApp and its parent company.

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WhatsApp postponed the update to May but months on, Indian officials remained unconvinced.

Other regulators and jurisdictions have also taken issue with the changes. Earlier this month, South Africa’s information regulator stated that WhatsApp couldn’t collect and share users’ contact information without the authority’s go-ahead.

India is a significant market for WhatsApp where it has more than 500m users but the privacy policy isn’t the only hurdle Facebook has met in the country.

The government is attempting to pass new digital media regulations that could force messaging apps to break end-to-end encryption. WhatsApp has stood firm against several governments in its insistence that it will not break encryption for any authority.

It adds to tense relations between the two sides as WhatsApp persists with expanding its presence in the massive market. Reuters reported that the company has hired a former Amazon executive to oversee WhatsApp’s payment business in the country.

While the payments features have been approved by Indian regulators, it is capped at 20m users for now.



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Microsoft to kill off old access rules in Exchange Online • The Register

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Microsoft next month will start phasing out Client Access Rules (CARs) in Exchange Online – and will do away with this means for controlling access altogether within a year.

CARs are being replaced with Continuous Access Evaluation (CAE) for Azure Active Directory, which can apparently in “near-real time” pick up changes to access controls, user accounts, and the network environment and enforce the latest rules and policies as needed, according to a notice this week from Microsoft’s Exchange Team.

That might be useful if suspicious activity is detected, or a user account needs to be suspended, and changes to access need to be immediate.

“Today, we are announcing the retirement of CARs in Exchange Online, to be fully deprecated by September 2023,” the advisory read. “We will send Message Center posts to tenants using client access rules to start the planning process to migrate their rules.”

CARs is used by Microsoft 365 administrators to allow or block client connections to Exchange Online based on a variety of characteristics set forth in policies and rules.

“You can prevent clients from connecting to Exchange Online based on their IP address (IPv4 and IPv6), authentication type, and user property values, and the protocol, application, service, or resource that they’re using to connect,” according to a Microsoft document from earlier this year.

For example, access can be granted to Exchange resources from specific IP address, and all other clients blocked. Similarly, the system can filter access to Exchange services by department or location, or based on usernames.

Microsoft announced the replacement CAE in January, touting its ability to act fast on account revocation, disablement, or deletion; password or user location changes; the detection of nefarious activity; and other such updates, according to a blog post at the time by Alex Simons, corporate vice president of product management for the Windows giant’s identity and network access division.

“On receiving such events, app sessions are immediately interrupted and users are redirected back to Azure AD to reauthenticate or reevaluate policy,” Simons wrote. “With CAE, we have introduced a new concept of zero trust authentication session management that is built on the foundation of zero trust principles – verify explicitly and assume breach.”

With this zero-trust focus, session integrity – rather than a set session duration – is what dictates a user’s authentication lifespan, we’re told.

CAE not only aims to give enterprises greater and more immediate control over access and events, but users and managers may appreciate the speed at which changes are adopted, Microsoft claims.

“Continuous access evaluation is implemented by enabling services, like Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Teams, to subscribe to critical Azure AD events,” Microsoft added earlier this month. “Those events can then be evaluated and enforced near real time. Critical event evaluation doesn’t rely on Conditional Access policies so it’s available in any tenant.”

Critical events can include a user account being deleted or disabled, a user password is changed or reset, or multifactor authentication is enabled for a user. There also are other events, such as when an administrator explicitly revokes all refresh tokens for a user or a rogue insider is detected by Azure AD Identity Protection.

Finally, for workload identities, CAE enforces token revocation for workloads, among other things, according to Microsoft. ®

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EU proposes new liability rules around AI tech to protect consumers

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The current EU rules around product liability are more than 40 years old, meaning they do not cover harm caused by drones and other AI tech.

The European Commission has outlined a set of new proposals to enable people who are harmed by AI tech products to seek and receive compensation.

The proposals were published today (28 September). They are designed to comply with the EU’s 2021 AI Act proposal, which set out a framework for trust in AI-related technology.

Today’s AI Liability Directive aims to provide a clear and comprehensive structure for all Europeans to claim compensation in the event they are harmed by AI tech products, such as drones and robots.

The EU’s directive includes rules for businesses and consumers alike to abide by. Those who are harmed by AI products or tech can seek compensation just as they would if they were in harmed any other way.

The rules will make it easier for people who have been discriminated against by AI technology as part of the recruitment process, for example, to pursue legal action.

An example of harm that may be caused by tech products is data loss. Robots, drones, smart-home systems and other similar digital products must also comply with cybersecurity regulations around addressing vulnerabilities.

The directive builds on existing rules that manufacturers must follow around unsafe products ­– no matter how high or low-tech they are.

It is proposing a number of different strategies to modernise and adapt liability rules specifically for digital products. The existing rules around product liability in the EU are almost 40 years old, and do not cover advanced technologies such as AI.

European commissioner for internal market, Thierry Breton, said that the existing rules have “been a cornerstone of the internal market for four decades”.

“Today’s proposal will make it fit to respond to the challenges of the decades to come. The new rules will reflect global value chains, foster innovation and consumer trust, and provide stronger legal certainty for businesses involved in the green and digital transition.”

Vice-president for values and transparency, Věra Jourová, said that for AI tech to thrive in the EU, it is important for people to trust digital innovation.

She added that the new proposals would give customers “tools for remedies in case of damage caused by AI so that they have the same level of protection as with traditional technologies”. The rules will also “ensure legal certainty” for the EU’s internal market.

As well as consumer protection, the proposals are designed to foster innovation. They have laid down guarantees for the AI sector through the introduction of measures such as the right to fight a liability claim based on a presumption of causality.

The AI Liability Directive will need to be agreed with EU countries and lawmakers before it can become law.

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Alfred Hitchcock: Vertigo review – uncomfortable for all the wrong reasons | Games

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Pendulo Studios’ Vertigo begins, just like the 1958 film, with a visual and musical motif of spirals. Round and round they go until you meet author Ed Miller in the worst moment of his life. Ed narrowly survives a car crash, but he loses his wife, Faye and their daughter. Staring down at the wreck of his car in a ravine, Ed suffers a debilitating bout of vertigo, only to relive the suicide of his father shortly after. A little later, you step into the shoes of Dr Julia Lomas, a therapist called in to deal with Ed’s vertigo and why he keeps talking about a wife and child whom no one but him seems to recall.

While it’s called Vertigo, complete with the licence of Hitchcock’s name and likeness, the game makes hamfisted references to the director’s work. Yes, there are birds, yes, someone will be ripping a shower curtain to the side. But when it comes to embodying the spirit of Vertigo itself, Sight and Sound’s greatest film of all time, it falls almost comically flat.

The mystery that Vertigo the game initially presents is intriguing, if quickly soured by how unbearable its protagonist is. Ed is childish and rude to the point of hostility without any obvious reason why. His behaviour is explained away by a traumatic childhood, bluntly presented as the root of all his issues and teased out by his therapist in a series of non-consensual hypnoses. The gameplay mimics Quantic Dream’s Detroit: Become Human, from awkwardly moving the controller to open a fridge and using timed button-presses to run, to rewinding memories, an idea that actually fits the concept of a therapist analysing her patient’s recollections quite well.

Screenshot from Alfred Hitchcock: Vertigo.
Awkward animation and mediocre voice acting … Alfred Hitchcock – Vertigo. Photograph: Microids

Due to its big licence and popular influences, it comes as a particularly sharp disappointment that the writing in the game version of Vertigo is the worst thing about it. Awkward animation and mediocre voice acting certainly don’t help. Dialogue, presumably recorded separately by actors alone in sound booths, sounds like two people having two different conversations (“What am I going to do without my husband?” “Well, you could start by making dinner”).

You might reasonably expect that a game named after the film Vertigo would, you know, follow the plot of Vertigo, but no. Everything happens in service of an increasingly ridiculous story, which reduces a film that featured male obsession, the male gaze and the ways in which victims unknowingly facilitate their own abuse, to the vendetta of a psychopath with a seemingly unlimited supply of drugs. If you thought the film was convoluted, try getting your head around this nonsense. It is almost worth playing for the part where an elderly man is, apparently convincingly, impersonated by a 24-year-old woman in a trenchcoat and sunglasses.

This version of Vertigo portrays women in a way that is seriously difficult to stomach in a post-#MeToo era. Here, women prey on an unsuspecting man using, for instance, sex and hypnosis to lure him in and do him harm. Male trauma is of course absolutely real, but this game doesn’t have the tools to examine it with the required care, and ends up essentially saying #MenToo – and doing a significant disservice to the body of cinematic work that inspires it.

Alfred Hitchcock – Vertigo is out now, £34.99.

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