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‘I learned a lot from Michaela’

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‘I lived through the darkness and learned how to move away’: The football manager looks back on the 10 turbulent years since his daughter’s murder

“I hope it is useful to people, that is what I really hope,” Mickey Harte says on the publication of his memoir Devotion, an account of what has been a turbulent and often heart-wrenching decade for the Ballygawley man and his family.

“I lived through the darkness and learned how to move away” are the stark words on the back of the book. It’s a coda for the shocking murder of Harte’s daughter Michaela McAreavey while on her honeymoon with John McAreavey in Mauritius in January 2011

That tragedy, while Ireland was still in a post-Christmas slumber, was a reminder that the country is a village: the outpouring of sympathy was national. There followed a protracted trial of two resort employees and their controversial acquittal, an ongoing quest for justice and, as chronicled here, the family’s attempts to fight their way through seasons of bewilderment.

A strong Catholic faith, which Harte has always openly espoused, runs through the narrative. His daughter had been an ardent supporter of the Tyrone senior football team since he became manager in 2003, the year they won the first of three senior All-Ireland titles in six years. Father and daughter were fast friends.

He stayed on as manager after the tragedy, the team winning two further Ulster titles and reaching the All-Ireland final of 2018. Harte coached the side through a serious cancer diagnosis, turning up for games when he should really have been in bed.

Harte’s 30-year involvement with Tyrone came to an end last November when he sat in a car in the dark with team captain Mattie Donnelly for 90 minutes during a county board meeting in Garvaghey, waiting for a text that never arrived.

He was always one to keep moving and was soon appointed Louth manager. He watched Tyrone win its fourth All-Ireland last September. “I’d a good seat in the Hogan Stand and enjoyed every minute of it.”

Harte now has more time to play golf and knocks down kilometres on a time-battered treadmill in the shed. Apart from an early morning daily visit to the local chapel, he doesn’t really know where the day will take him.

The room in which he is sitting for this interview, talking into a laptop screen, is filled with sunlight. More often than not, the house is teeming with grandchildren. It is, he says, a good time for his wife, Marian, and himself. And the publication of this book marks the end of a project that was intense and revelatory.

“It was an organic evolution of a conversation,” he says of the collaboration with the Kildare journalist Brendan Coffey. It began with a casual chat; they sparked, a sense of trust and friendship developed, and over the course of several years they talked about Harte’s life through the prism of the past decade.

The book is told in Harte’s words but also includes short, piercing first-person accounts of the days after Michaela’s death from her brothers and husband.

“It was enlightening for me, too, the way Brendan dealt with this and had these interviews with our sons and with John,” Harte says now.

“That, I suppose, told a tale for me that was very valuable because we had never sat down and had that individual in-depth conversation with each other. You felt you knew what was going on in everybody’s mind but you didn’t see it through their eyes.”

Although the subject matter of the book is harrowing in places, one of its achievements is to present a rounded memory of Michaela Harte, later Michaela McAreavey: kind, mischievous, a chatterbox, into glamour, a sister who could offer sound advice to her brothers and also drive them up the walls; a young woman who, in high-octane Celtic Tiger Ireland, was completely unfazed by the fact that her values and beliefs were not always in step with those of broader society.

“Aye. She was loyal to the faith she believed in and grew up in. And she held fast to the traditions and standards of the church as she saw it. She was that kind of person. And that made me very proud of her. I liked her single-mindedness. I liked her ability to say: the right thing is more important than the popular thing in her eyes.”

I learned a lot from Michaela’s life in the things she liked. She loved older people. She loved her granny and grandad

Marian and Mickey Harte had three boys and one girl. Although a broken finger as a child ended Michaela’s interest in playing Gaelic football, she began accompanying her father to team training when she was a kid and never lost the habit. It was their thing long before he became senior manager.

The Hartes raised their children in an orthodox Catholic tradition. It was and remains a central element of how they live. Throughout his new book, Harte remembers how his daughter practised her faith .

“Did I learn anything? Well, maybe not from her faith. I learned a lot from Michaela’s life in the things she liked. She loved older people. She loved her granny and grandad. She was attracted to older people – to stewards at gates at games, say, maybe because she could work her way past all of them with her charm and get to places she couldn’t otherwise get to.

Mickey Harte with daughter Michaela and son-in-law John McAreavey on their wedding day in Ballymacilroy, Co Antrim in January 2011. ‘He was one of our family. He was special in Michaela’s life so he is always going to be special in our lives too.’ Photograph: Irish News
Mickey Harte with daughter Michaela and son-in-law John McAreavey on their wedding day in Ballymacilroy, Co Antrim in January 2011. ‘He was one of our family. He was special in Michaela’s life so he is always going to be special in our lives too.’ Photograph: Irish News

“And she had an equal love for children. Young children would gravitate to her, and she would be all over them. So she had a love for both age groups. I noticed the connection with the grandparents, the sheer love she had for them, and learning and hearing from things of theirs back in the day. More so with Marian’s because my parents died when she was young.

“And I noticed the sheer love between a grandparent and grandchild. And she taught me that – I am that grandparent now.”

Her death naturally asked different questions of how each of the family relied upon and practised their faith. His son Mattie had begun to ask himself serious questions in the aftermath: it seemed as if he might be on the verge of quitting religion. Instead, he took a dive into the doctrine and experienced what is described as a profound spiritual crossing.

Harte speaks as openly and naturally about Catholicism as he does Gaelic football. But he smiles at the idea that he might judge how others do or don’t practice.

“It would be no business of mine to judge anybody else in what they do with their faith. I would see it as a faith handed on to me from previous generations who probably weren’t as questioning as today. But there is probably a lot to be said for the way they believed even if it wasn’t a searching belief, if you like. And I would think that because some people throw that out as archaic, they haven’t replaced it with much of substance. That’s an issue, I feel.

“And I never could see that if you are a Catholic and there are certain things the Catholic faith teaches, why would you be considered sort of rare because you do that?”

Because certain people within the church did certain things that weren’t right… does that destroy all the good work that went on? There has to be a sense of balance

He nods at the obvious response: that if the visit of Pope John Paul in 1979 was the high-water mark of mass-movement Catholicism, the litany of abuse scandals and the gradual erosion of influence has seen a big retreat.

“Is there not a slight sense of imbalance there?” he reasons. “That because certain people within the church did certain things that weren’t right and weren’t good… does that destroy all the good work that went on? There has to be a sense of balance.

“I think that far and away the people in religious life are very good people who have a serious impact on people’s lives. It is so easy to throw out the baby with the bathwater. To say these things went on – so is the get-out clause not living your faith because someone did it in a poor fashion? That does a great disservice to the great number of really good priests and religious who have been part of our lives.”

There has always been a radical aspect to Harte’s public profile. His first All-Ireland-winning Tyrone team was sensationally confrontational in its antic, chaotic style, which sent the sport itself in a different direction.

Feted as an innovative manager, Harte was a gifted footballer whose Tyrone career was sabotaged by an internal club row that opened a chasm within the community. A full decade of friendships frosted over, and the Ballygawley community was effectively locked out of official football in the 1980s. The only reason it was patched up was because the elders realised that the juvenile Peter Canavan was a once-in-a-century proposition – that it would be immoral not to have him playing for Tyrone.

Harte has never regretted a second of that standoff because, as he outlines, he believes he was doing the right thing on principle. It’s his first and only arbiter. He has broken from convention, such as his appearance at a rally for Seán Quinn in 2012. He is completely indifferent to the court of public opinion in expressing his beliefs, Catholic or otherwise.

His standoff with RTÉ, which has parallels with the club football row, is now a decade long, and Harte is adamant that he won’t speak or deal with the Irish state broadcaster again. Ever.

Until 2010, his relationship with RTÉ was cordial if unremarkable. In that year, he sent a private letter to the director general and board chairman to protest what he felt was a demotion in the games assigned to Brian Carthy, the Gaelic Games correspondent for RTÉ Radio.

Carthy was and remains a popular and highly-regarded figure on the GAA circuit, and other managers voiced the same concerns. Harte heard nothing back for over a week. Some kind of conciliation was then reached through Tyrone county board officials but, shortly after that, the contents of the letter appeared in a national newspaper. RTÉ denied that it was responsible for the leak. Harte cannot believe this is the case.

“That’s fair to say. From where it landed anyway, whether it was the individuals it was sent to, I’m not prepared to say that. But it was sent as a private and confidential correspondence. And someone got a good look at it.”

The point of no return occurred in the summer of 2011. An ill-devised sketch lampooned Harte for attending the Dalai Lama conference in Limerick with his son-in-law. The sketch closed with the playing of Pretty Little Girl from Omagh, which the family felt was grossly insensitive.

While he refused to communicate with RTÉ, he emphasises that he never stopped the Tyrone players from doing so. “They were supporting me, which I really respected. But I never stopped the players from talking.”

It appears that at an institutional level they were saying we have to put manners on this boy because otherwise he is going to cause us bother. That is how it appeared to me

His belief remains that the breakdown originated in the letter of support he sent, and he rejects the idea that having made his point, it might be easier to just let it go.

“Naw, there is a time to do that and a way to do that,” he says. “And when that time and that way passes, it isn’t there anymore. It appears that at an institutional level they were saying we have to put manners on this boy because otherwise he is going to cause us bother. That is how it appeared to me.”

 

These are the two sides of Harte. He is utterly rigid on points of principle yet completely adaptable in unexpected ways. Somehow, there is plenty of laughter in a book dealing with such weighty subjects.

He never visited Mauritius. Their son Mark volunteered to fly out in the nightmarish aftermath and attended the trial. But he says he would, in theory, like to ask the two men charged with his daughter’s death if it had been worth it, just to cover up a thieving ring. His hope would be that they would at least acknowledge that what happened in that room was not intentional.

Michaela and John McAreavey on their honeymoon. Photograph: McAreavey family handout/PA Wire
Michaela and John McAreavey on their honeymoon. Photograph: McAreavey family handout/PA Wire

“Because I think it would be better if that were the case. And of the two men implicated in this –albeit they were acquitted – of the two, I feel there were two different personalities and people. And I think one of them found himself in a place that he happened to be in and might not have wanted to be in. I am not so sure about the other one.

“So I think I might hear two different stories there. I think one of them would be capable more than the other of doing whatever he felt necessary to save his face or the vice ring that was going on in terms of the stealing that was there. So I just have a picture of two different people being there. That is my impression. One knew what he was doing and the other happened to be implicated by his presence.”

The passages where he recounts the six weeks John McAreavey spent living with the family after the murder are very pure and sad. They walked early in the morning, made simple breakfasts, and talked and talked. Harte asked his son-in-law if he was okay for that to be included.

“He was one of our family. He was special in Michaela’s life so he is always going to be special in our lives too. And he gave that sense of Michaela’s presence still being there. He was so important to her and he meant so much to her in life that it was good to have him around in those darkest days. I think it would have been a mutual feeling in that it made him feel he had some connection with Michaela. It was very difficult but thank God we are well beyond it now.”

That comes across. It’s clear the Hartes have an intricate and steadfast network of friendships within the Ballygawley and greater Tyrone community. Disappointed as Harte was with his closing hour as Tyrone manager, he holds no recriminations and looks back on the 30 years with pride. In the end, he was happy to be just another Tyrone fan last September.

“Yes, it would have been lovely to be there on the sideline. You can’t deny that. But the next best thing is to be there when Tyrone win it. I told the group of players before I left that I wanted to win an All-Ireland for them. Because we did soldier a long time and I think we built those players up over a number of years to get to that level so yes it would have been nice to cross the line with them again. But I am so glad that they got there.”

Now it is autumn and Mickey Harte has time to sit back. He has reached a stage where, he says towards the end, he is “mad about life, savouring every minute”. Louth training will resume in the new year. In the meantime comes the publication of this book and his hope that it might bring solace to other people.

“It is very emotional, obviously,” he says. “That is the big thing. It is not even the heavy parts, if you like. There are little times and phrases and sentences. Like when my son Michael wrote the letter to me . . . I mean, that was a big thing that I didn’t think would affect me the way it did. But it did. And other times you just read little lines and nuances and the in-depth treatment of that time and how things were. It is an emotional read.

“But I would balance that off with believing there can be some great value to others when they read this and that there can be a sense of hope from difficult and dark places. And to me that is a price worth paying. Going through the emotion again is a price worth paying if I can help someone else have a sense of hope in their life when that seems all nigh impossible.”

Devotion: A Memoir by Mickey Harte with Brendan Coffey is published by Harper Collins Ireland

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Eco-friendly products for your home from bed throws to carpet runners

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Are your interiors green? Eco-friendly products for your home, from bed throws and carpet runners, to recycled from plastic bottles

  • We look at some eco-friendly homeware products made from recycled goods 
  • The products include soft carpet runners made out of plastic bottles










If you thought that having recycled homewares in your house meant accepting hand-me-downs, it is time to think again.

Homeware designers are increasingly looking to use recycled materials, shifting away from throwaway culture and getting involved in the circular economy to help the planet. 

We take a look at some of the latest homeware products available, from glass tumblers to bed throws – and even soft recycled carpet runners made out of yarn made from plastic bottles.

We take a look at some homeware products made from recycled goods such as this runner made out of plastic bottles (scroll down for more details)

We take a look at some homeware products made from recycled goods such as this runner made out of plastic bottles (scroll down for more details)

The products are made by companies such as Weaver Green, which works to turn some of the 135 billion plastic bottles that end up in the sea and landfill into practical and beautiful items for our homes.

Tasha Green, of Weaver Green, explained: ‘The key challenge has been to turn hard plastic into the lovely soft open fibres, so that the yarn genuinely has the look and feel of wool.

‘This process has taken over seven years to perfect, and we now have a robust, soft yarn that is machine washable, stain resistant, suitable for indoor and outdoor use and most importantly environmentally friendly.’

Recycled products for your home

1. Recycled carpet runners

Weaver Green produces this runner called Andalucia Zahara, which is available from £162

Weaver Green produces this runner called Andalucia Zahara, which is available from £162

Weaver Green produces a range of 100 per cent recycled items, including carpet runners made from recycled plastic bottles. 

Ms Green explained: ‘Runners allow you to instantly update and change the feel of a room. 

‘A statement runner can be the main design feature from which you complement other interior elements in your home. 

‘For example, a simple herringbone helps to create a classic timeless look from which you can add vibrant or strong patterns and prints with other accessories.’

The company produces a runner called Andalucia Zahara, which is available from £162.

2. Recycled planters 

The LSA Canopy Collection has shapes inspired by the Eden Projects iconic biomes

The LSA Canopy Collection has shapes inspired by the Eden Projects iconic biomes 

These recycled hanging planters are made from 100 per cent recycled glass bottles and jars.

They evolved from a collaboration between London-based design studio LSA International and the Eden Project in Cornwall.

Together, they created the Canopy Collection, with domed and curved shapes inspired by the Eden Projects iconic biomes.

These recycled hanging planters are made from 100 per cent recycled glass bottles
This plant hangers are a collaboration between LSA International and the Eden Project

These recycled hanging planters are made from 100 per cent recycled glass bottles and jars

A LSA spokesman for the project said: ‘Each piece is mouthblown from 100 per cent recycled glass, following the sustainable practice of turning discarded material into something useful.

‘A subtle green tint is produced, and air bubbles will occur as part of the recycled source material and handmade process.’

The canopy hanging planter is available via LSA International and costs £26.

3. Recycled glass tumblers 

LSA International also produces the Mia Collection, which includes these recycled glass tumblers

LSA International also produces the Mia Collection, which includes these recycled glass tumblers

LSA International is also behind the Mia Collection, which is also made from recycled materials.

This collection focuses on turning recycled glass into several items, including these tumblers. A set of four Mai Tall Highball tumblers cost £32.

4. Recycled bed throws 

Recycled materials can even appear on beds - such as in these throws that are made out of old plastic bottles

Recycled materials can even appear on beds – such as in these throws that are made out of old plastic bottles

Weaver Green has a range of such bed throws, which are made of yarn that has the look and feel of wool (pictured: its Darjeeling rainbow throw costing £65)

Weaver Green has a range of such bed throws, which are made of yarn that has the look and feel of wool (pictured: its Darjeeling rainbow throw costing £65)

Recycled materials can even appear on beds, such as in these throws – pictured above and below – that are made out of old plastic bottles.

Weaver Green produces the bed throws, which are made of yarn that has the look and feel of wool.

Its Darjeeling rainbow throw costs £65, while its Madras pink and gold throws cost £55 each.

Weaver Green's Madras Check pink and gold bed throws are priced at £55 each

Weaver Green’s Madras Check pink and gold bed throws are priced at £55 each 

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do I know who I am anymore?’

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When the New Zealand government announced a nationwide lockdown in response to Covid-19 in March, 2020, newly-arrived Lolsy Byrne was desperately trying to find a flight back to Ireland.

Byrne, a stand-up comedian, had come to New Zealand in March to play a festival in Dunedin. Her plan was to stay for a few months, travelling and gigging, before heading back for the Edinburgh Fringe in August.

Not wanting to take a flight from a medical professional or someone who was in desperate need to get home, Byrne never got a flight home. Instead, she stayed with a relative in Auckland, where she now lives.

Lolsy Byrne
Lolsy Byrne

Luckily, Byrne became trapped in a country that quickly got a handle on the virus. But being in a brand new place in the midst of all the initial pandemic chaos was challenging. “It was really difficult. When you’re on your own, you struggle to make connections, but, luckily, I was able to get involved in the comedy scene over here and they kind of embraced me with open arms and were really really supportive,” she said. “The sense of humour in New Zealand is so like the Irish sense of humour, we all love telling stories and a lot of self-deprecating humour.”

Byrne regularly plays at a Scottish-Irish comedy night for expats in Auckland, run by a Scottish comedian, who also got stuck in New Zealand when Covid broke out. “You find yourself relaxing into your accent. I tend to put on my phone voice a lot when I’m on stage so people can hear me clearly. But then when we do these Scottish and Irish gigs, all these Irish-isms start flowing out of me.”

New Zealand pursued a hardline elimination strategy early on. Prime minister Jacinda Ardern’s government had closed the borders to non-citizens and introduced a nationwide lockdown by March 25th, 2020. Since then, Ardern has said on numerous occasions that she would “make no apologies” for implementing strict measures to stop the spread of the deadly coronavirus.

This is the longest time since we’ve been back. We usually go back every 18 months

New Zealand has a similar population to Ireland’s, yet 35 people died with coronavirus while 5,609 people died with the virus in Ireland. For most of the pandemic, their strategy of sharp and strict lockdowns earned New Zealand a reputation as the little island that eliminated coronavirus. New Zealanders enjoyed freedoms that few other nations could.

Seeing Ireland struggling through long lockdowns was also challenging for Byrne. She said there was a sense of guilt about leading a normal life in New Zealand, while friends and family back home were doing it tough.

Elimination strategy

However, in August, 2021, a Delta outbreak sent the nation into lockdown. By early October, Ardern had abandoned her elimination strategy, focusing instead on living with coronavirus and controlling its spread through vaccinations. 82 per cent of New Zealand’s eligible population is now fully vaccinated.

Auckland has been in lockdown since August, with restrictions now beginning to ease. Byrne says she’s watching her friends in Dublin going out and performing again, while she’s in lockdown. Although she hadn’t planned to stay in New Zealand for so long, or to live through a pandemic there, she says she feels “ridiculously fortunate and lucky” and wouldn’t change her “strange position “ for the world.

At the moment, only citizens are allowed to travel in and out of New Zealand. Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) for seven days is necessary for any international arrivals.

Steve Doran, from Howth, Co Dublin, says the idea of visiting home now is much more appealing now that Ireland has opened up.

But the travel restrictions would still make it very difficult for his family of four to travel back.

Steve Doran and family
Steve Doran and family

Now, with Auckland in lockdown, Doran said he was jealous watching friends of his at the Aviva when Ireland beat the All Blacks in November. An avid rugby fan, he says he would have been there without a doubt, had the travel restrictions not been in place.

Lockdown in Auckland has taken a toll on Doran and his family, especially his seven-year-old, who misses his school friends, he says. Doran also works in retail, which has just recently reopened in Auckland after months in lockdown. But he worries about potentially losing some of his colleagues who are anti-vaccination if a mandate is brought in.

Travel restrictions and uncertainty around international flights also worries Will Ward from Milltown, outside of Mullingar, who moved to New Zealand 20 years ago. Ward hasn’t been home now for more than four years. “This is the longest time since we’ve been back. We usually go back every 18 months.”

Will Ward
Will Ward

When the case numbers started rising in Ireland back at the beginning of the pandemic, Ward said he would be glued to the Irish media, checking the numbers first thing every morning. “I was really concerned about family back home. I was fearful here in New Zealand, but not for New Zealand, more for family back home,” he said.

When lockdown ended in Auckland in 2020 and Ward started going on trips, camping or hiking, he would ask his family if they wanted photos or not. There was a sense of guilt; he didn’t want to rub his freedom in his family’s faces. “They were living in this vortex of despair and hopelessness and that was concerning because here in New Zealand we were living pretty a carefree existence.”

On a positive note, Ward says contact with his family has “exponentially jumped”.

“The contact with mum and dad has never been as regular or as positive…I think my relationship with my parents is at a deeper level than it’s ever been before.

“For two years, this mortality thing has been omnipresent: You need to say stuff now.”

Kilcastle’s a very small community and even though they’re not minding you, they are in a way. We were brought up as a community

But with travel restrictions still in place, he’s still unsure about when he’ll be able to get back to Ireland. “Not knowing now when I’m going to get back and give mum and dad a hug, that’s the key thing. People are getting older.”

Ward says he’s been reflecting on Ireland and his Irish identity a lot more in the past few years.

When he sees new generations of Irish people now, he’s struck by a “confidence, a self-assuredness” that he said didn’t really exist in his or his parents’ generation. “I started seeing almost like a non-acceptance of victimhood…just a proud nation to be Irish rather than necessarily a connection to struggle,” he said.

Identity

Anne Marie O’Neill, from Kilcastle, Co Clare, has been in New Zealand for nine years.

O’Neill says she lost her home, her job, and went through a divorce during the last recession in Ireland.

Ann Marie O’Neill
Ann Marie O’Neill

She rekindled a relationship with a man she’d known all her life and together they sold everything they had left and moved to Gisborne on the east coast of the North Island.

O’Neill left Ireland after her mother died and says she hasn’t had much desire to move back to Ireland since emigrating. “For me going home isn’t a big deal but what I’ve lost is that connection: do I know who I am anymore?”

O’Neill says she missed feeling comfortable in her surroundings and not having to constantly “tell her story.”

“Kilcastle’s a very small community and even though they’re not minding you, they are in a way. We were brought up as a community.”

In March, 2021, O’Neill’s brother, who she was extremely close with, died of cancer. In the months leading up to his death, O’Neill said he became uncomfortable with carers coming to his house during the pandemic and that he’d also become dependent on the pain medication he was on. She managed his care via WhatApp or Skype calls, calling for hours each morning and evening.

In his final weeks, O’Neill took time off work and “sat with him 24/7 on Skype… we just let it run.”

She said they prayed, played music, and organised his funeral together.

When he died, O’Neill couldn’t leave the country for the funeral. She watched it on a WhatsApp video call, although she said she just wanted to be home and to be immersed in the grieving process.

“It stopped me from embracing my brother’s final days and death with other people. I wanted to be there and I wanted to be proud to be his only sister walking behind the coffin. I couldn’t do that for him.”

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‘Colour drenching’ interiors trend sees walls, ceiling and woodwork painted the SAME colour

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Walls, ceiling and woodwork all painted in the same tone? It’s a bold approach, but the trend for ‘colour drenching’ is taking hold.

‘Softly, softly’ has largely been the approach to painted walls in recent years, but that’s about to change. 

Many of us who spent more time at home during the pandemic experienced a desire to express ourselves through our interiors, and paint colour is an easy way to inject personality.

Blended: A dining room drenched in shades of blue. It's a bold approach but the trend for 'colour drenching' is taking hold, according to interiors experts

Blended: A dining room drenched in shades of blue. It’s a bold approach but the trend for ‘colour drenching’ is taking hold, according to interiors experts

‘We’re seeing a more liberal use of a single colour in our recent projects,’ says Rosie Ward, creative director at Ward & Co. 

‘Known as ‘colour drenching’, the concept might seem daunting at first, but when executed thoughtfully, it can give a home a wonderful sense of cohesion, character and flow as well as creating a surprisingly calming atmosphere.’

Select a shade 

Whether you choose a soothing mid-tone or a bold, all-enveloping colour, the idea is to drench your space in one hue — or tonal variations of it — from walls and ceiling to woodwork, the inside of doorways, window frames and even radiators.

‘Using a single shade in this way adds a feeling of grandeur as well as providing a chic, minimalist base,’ says Benjamin Moore’s Helen Shaw.

‘Varying levels of saturation can be a great way to take your home from bland to bold, as well as instantly shifting a room’s dimensions.’

 If your home lacks features, colour drenching is a great way to add impact.’

Roby Baldan, interior designer 

Colour drenching can work with any colour, but it does require thought and a full-on rather than half-hearted approach. Deep shades of blue or green can work beautifully in kitchens; blood-red can be enlivening in studies, cloakrooms and cosy living spaces — especially those that face north. 

For a subtle approach, a dusty pink drench works beautifully in sitting rooms and hallways, and pairs naturally with aged brass or gold fittings.

‘Using the same shade throughout helps flatten less appealing features, like radiators, making them disappear into the background,’ says interior designer Roby Baldan. 

‘A single shade makes the perimeter of the room recede and everything else stand out. In period homes, you can use a different tone to highlight architectural elements for a look that’s both modern and dramatic.

‘If your home lacks features, colour drenching is a great way to add impact.’

Work it like a pro

There are a few things to bear in mind to make this look a success.

First, choose the right tone. ‘Bold, saturated jewel greens and teals work very well,’ says Crown’s Justyna Korczynska. ‘Dark greys to near black and deep navy shades are also good choices. But avoid super-brights, as they can be overpowering.’

If you are a little hesitant, start with a small space such as a cloakroom.

‘Select three variations of your chosen colour, ranging from pale to deep,’ advises Roby. ‘Look at the amount of natural light available. Some rooms are suited to pale colours, while others need deep shades.

‘If the room gets plenty of light, select the palest shade as the primary wall colour, choosing darker tones for features. If the room is dark, use the darker shades as the main colour and the palest for the trim.’

How to coordinate 

A fashion-forward option is to complement colour drenched walls with furniture for bold cohesion. This is a look that works in kitchens too — deVol’s new Heirloom range looks great in a deep burgundy finish against pale pink walls.

Sometimes, picking out a colour from a key piece of artwork is all it takes to kickstart your scheme.

Furniture, curtains, cushions, lamps, rugs, accessories and even flowers can be used to intensify the look, but stick to no more than a couple of different colours to avoid visual overload. 

This is a statement trend that’s all about sticking to your guns — commit to the look fully and you won’t go wrong.

What your home needs is a… festive table runner 

Detail: The Nathalie Lete Table Runner costs £58 (anthropologie.com)

Detail: The Nathalie Lete Table Runner costs £58 (anthropologie.com)

Some people refuse to step into Christmas until the last minute. Others deck the halls at the earliest opportunity. 

If you prefer the festive middle ground, but still want to bring cheer to your interior before you break out the baubles, your home needs a Christmas table runner.

If you like an understated Yuletide style, the £14.95 Not On The High Street beige linen runner decorated with snowflakes should suit.

H&M Home’s £6 plain red runner would serve as a base for greenery, colourful napkins and candlesticks. 

If you want more adornment, options include the £58 Nathalie Lete Table Runner. Wayfair has a £13.99 runner with a grey stag’s head.

But there are also opportunities to go over the top. At Lakeland, you can find a £14.99 gold glitter runner while Marks & Spencer can supply a £25 runner with sequins in red or white, or another, in red and grey and also costing £25, with lights operated by batteries. Ho, ho, ho.

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