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Give the dog a home: Rental laws are changing to help pet owners

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A pet can be a best friend in testing times. So perhaps it’s no surprise that so many of us have acquired cats, dogs, or even goldfish over the past year.

About half of those who bought a pet during lockdown already owned one, keen to enjoy more of the fun and health benefits that flow from canine, feline or any pet companionship. 

The amount we spend each year on the animals that share our lives – and our homes – has more than doubled over a decade to £6.9 billion. About 10 per cent of households without a pet intend to change this in the next six months.

Creature comforts: Quintain Living's Ferrum flats in Wembley Park. The Build-to-rent operator views pet-friendly policies as a blueprint for the private rental market

Creature comforts: Quintain Living’s Ferrum flats in Wembley Park. The Build-to-rent operator views pet-friendly policies as a blueprint for the private rental market

Yet, despite our wish to guarantee that members of our domestic menageries have every creature comfort, we have often fallen short.

For example, people with a cat or dog have struggled to rent homes, with only 7 per cent of landlords advertising pet-friendly properties. 

But such prohibitions are set to end, as the Government’s new model tenancy agreement will allow those with ‘well-behaved pets’ to secure leases more easily. 

A landlord must provide a good reason, such as the size of a property, to object to a pet.

Some landlords may be in two minds about this change. But there is mounting competition in the private rental market, thanks to the burgeoning build-to-rent sector, which is more welcoming to pets.

Dog digs: Lucy McSwiggan and Yorkshire terrier RubyRu

Dog digs: Lucy McSwiggan and Yorkshire terrier RubyRu

Build-to-rent schemes are U.S.-style residential blocks, financed by banks and pension funds and now springing up in our cities. 

These schemes offer facilities and services such as concierges, gyms, socialising spaces and superfast broadband.

They share a key objective: to create communities and combat loneliness. Already there are some 24,000 build-to-rent homes in London, with about 50,000 more on the way.

Taking the view that pets are an integral part of the family is Lorenzo Carraro, head of residential development lettings at Savills, who says: ‘A dog provides a perfect excuse to start a conversation with your neighbours.’

Build-to-rent operator Quintain Living views pet-friendly policies as a blueprint for the private rental market.

The company will have 3,255 homes at its project at Wembley Park in North-West London, making it the largest scheme of its type in the UK.

Meanwhile, Ryan Prince, founder and chief executive of Uncle, the build-to-rent operator with six schemes in London and Manchester, says: ‘We want to create the best living environments for our residents. 

This means beautiful physical spaces, but it’s also focused on mental health. What helps mental health more than the unconditional love of a pet?’

Mr Prince aspires to take the ‘lord’ out of ‘landlord’, which typifies build-to-rent’s more accommodative stance.

As Sarah Tinsley, Quintain Living’s marketing director, says: ‘We’re shaking up the ideas of what a landlord should be.’

In pursuit of its aim to be ‘pet-progressive’, the Quintain Living offer should soon include ‘doggy day care’ and walking services. 

And at Ferrum, one of the Wembley Park blocks – with New York-inspired warehouse interiors – Launder-O-Mutt grooming facilities are to open soon. The monthly rent on a two-bedroom unfurnished apartment here is £2,050.

About 15 per cent of Quintain Living apartments have a pet resident, but there is an additional £50 to pay for a dog, or £30 for a cat. Dogs wear a tag and the owners must tidy up after their pets.

Lucy McSwiggan, 33, a primary school head-teacher, has benefited from the Wembley scheme pet concession, having acquired RubyRu, a Yorkshire terrier, at the start of the first lockdown.

She says: ‘My family thought I was mad, given my high-pressure job. They said: ‘You’re on your own and now you want to take on a puppy?’ But she’s been my own lockdown superhero and a lifesaver.

‘RubyRu is known and loved by everyone in our dog-friendly building. She is one of a pack of lockdown puppies.

‘Across the corridor, there’s David with his labradoodle, Fergus.’

Amateur landlords who are doubtful about the trend may change their minds. As one admits: ‘I may have to rethink my pet ban — particularly if it means I can negotiate a higher rent.’ 

On the market… perfect for pooches 

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Robbie Williams lists sprawling 72-acre country estate for £6.75 million

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Robbie WIlliams has listed his sprawling 72-acre country estate for £6.75 million.

The Take That crooner, 47, used the home as a rural retreat for his wife Ayda Field and their children, having purchased it in 2009 for £8.1 million.

The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire about 85 miles from London

Take that! Robbie WIlliams has listed his sprawling 72-acre country estate for £6.75 million

Take that! Robbie WIlliams has listed his sprawling 72-acre country estate for £6.75 million

Ready to move on: The Take That crooner, 47, used the home as a rural retreat for his wife Ayda Field and their children, having purchased it in 2009 for £8.1 million

Big family: Robbie and Ayda, 42, share Theodora, eight, Charlton, six, two-year-old Colette and youngest son Beau, one

Ready to move on: The Take That crooner, 47, used the home as a rural retreat for his wife Ayda Field and their children, having purchased it in 2009 for £8.1 million. Robbie and Ayda, 42, share Theodora, eight, Charlton, six, two-year-old Colette and youngest son Beau, one

Robbie said, via the listing agent Knight Frank: ‘Compton Bassett House has been the perfect escape for our family. The gardens and trees have enchanted us with their magic, and on rainy days – of which there are many in England – we have played and splashed around the indoor pool, much to our delight.’ 

Robbie and Ayda, 42, share Theodora, eight, Charlton, six, two-year-old Colette and youngest son Beau, one.

The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills.

Also outside in the grounds is a helicopter hangar, a walled garden with a pavilion, a tennis court, and paddocks for horses. 

Robbie said, via the listing agent: 'On rainy days - of which there are many in England - we have played and splashed around the indoor pool, much to our delight'

Robbie said, via the listing agent: ‘On rainy days – of which there are many in England – we have played and splashed around the indoor pool, much to our delight’

Sprawling: The floorplan shows the layout of the impressive three-storey mansion

Sprawling: The floorplan shows the layout of the impressive three-storey mansion

Serene: The property boasts a walled garden with a pavilion, a tennis court, and paddocks for horses

Serene: The property boasts a walled garden with a pavilion, a tennis court, and paddocks for horses

Chopper-ready: Also outside in the grounds is a helicopter hangar

Chopper-ready: Also outside in the grounds is a helicopter hangar

The mansion itself is spread across 19,913 square feet, boasting seven bedrooms, and eight bathrooms.

There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room.

The gourmet chef’s kitchen is an impressive feature of the home with a stunning blue wooden island and a sprawling dining space for large gatherings.

Robbie and American actress Ayda’s quirky tastes are evident throughout – with giant dog sculptures lined around the hardwood floored cooking space. 

Music mogul: Robbie shot to fame as one fifth of 90s boyband Take That [pictured in the early 1990s with Jason Orange, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow and Mark Owen]

At it alone: Robbie has become the only one of the band to carve out a particularly successful solo career, since going on to collaborate with stars such as Nicole Kidman [pictured  in 2001]

Music mogul: Having shot to fame as one fifth of 90s boyband Take That [pictured L in the early 1990s with Jason Orange, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow and Mark Owen] Robbie has become the only one of the band to carve out a particularly successful solo career, since going on to collaborate with stars such as Nicole Kidman [pictured R in 2001] 

Rural retreat: 'Compton Bassett House has been the perfect escape for our family. The gardens and trees have enchanted us with their magic,' Robbie said of the estate

Rural retreat: ‘Compton Bassett House has been the perfect escape for our family. The gardens and trees have enchanted us with their magic,’ Robbie said of the estate

Sweeping: The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire

Sweeping: The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire

Quirky: The gourmet chef's kitchen is an impressive feature of the home with a stunning blue wooden island and a sprawling dining space for large gatherings

Quirky: The gourmet chef’s kitchen is an impressive feature of the home with a stunning blue wooden island and a sprawling dining space for large gatherings

Extra space: There is also a detached cottage which joins two staff flats to provide extra accommodation for staff or guests

Extra space: There is also a detached cottage which joins two staff flats to provide extra accommodation for staff or guests

The property features modern classical architecture and several stone fireplaces.

There is also a detached cottage which joins two staff flats to provide extra accommodation for staff or guests.

The home features a long stony driveway, rolling up to the impressive 1929 home – previously owned by the famous architect Sir Norman Foster.

Other features include stone mullioned windows, a study and a hidden staircase to the floor above. 

Part-timer: Robbie still dips in and out of performing with Take That [pictured in 2018]

Part-timer: Robbie still dips in and out of performing with Take That [pictured in 2018]

Master suite: The mansion itself is spread across 19,913 square feet, boasting seven bedrooms

Master suite: The mansion itself is spread across 19,913 square feet, boasting seven bedrooms

Modern meets regal: The property features modern classical architecture and several stone fireplaces

Modern meets regal: The property features modern classical architecture and several stone fireplaces

Niche: The décor and accents are a clear nod to their eccentric owners

Niche: The décor and accents are a clear nod to their eccentric owners

‘Although our clients are sad to be leaving, they’re certain that the next owners will love it as much as they have,’ the listing agent said. ‘The house has the benefit of being on the edge of the village but also has beautiful gardens, and grounds surrounding it providing complete privacy and protection.’

Having shot to fame as one fifth of 90s boyband Take That, Robbie has become the only one of the band to carve out a particularly successful solo career.

Despite his wild child younger years, he has recently established himself firmly as a family man, marrying Los Angeles native Ayda in 2010. 

Style secrets: Robbie and American actress Ayda's quirky tastes are evident throughout - with giant dog sculptures lined around the hardwood floored home [pictured in 2018]

Style secrets: Robbie and American actress Ayda’s quirky tastes are evident throughout – with giant dog sculptures lined around the hardwood floored home [pictured in 2018]

Decadent: The home features a whopping eight bathrooms, some with freestanding tubs

Decadent: The home features a whopping eight bathrooms, some with freestanding tubs

Quirky: Robbie and American actress Ayda's quirky tastes are evident throughout - with one poster featuring a play on words from his Let Me Entertain You song - 'Let Me Excavate You'

Quirky: Robbie and American actress Ayda’s quirky tastes are evident throughout – with one poster featuring a play on words from his Let Me Entertain You song – ‘Let Me Excavate You’

60s meets modern: There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room

60s meets modern: There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room

Tranquil: The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills

Tranquil: The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills

Robbie quit Take That in 1995 but returned to the band between 2006-2011, on and off.

He still occasionally performs with them; the group continue on as a three-piece, with Gary Barlow, Howard Donald and Mark Owen. Fifth member Jason Orange quit in 2014.

Robbie’s solo career has seen him collaborate with the likes of Nicole Kidman and Kylie Minogue on tracks, and he has released 12 studio albums to date.

He is said to be worth £195 million, as reported by The Sunday Times in May 2021. 

Out in the sticks: The location is 85 miles away from London

Out in the sticks: The location is 85 miles away from London

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Property investors offended by ‘vulture funds’ label, conference hears

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People in Ireland need to stop calling property investment firms “vulture funds” and development and building rules need to stop changing if the housing crisis is to be solved, property and banking sector representatives have said.

Marie Hunt, executive director of research at real estate firm CBRE, told an Irish Council for Social Housing conference that the “fundamental problem” in the Irish housing market “is a lack of supply”.

She said bureaucracy and regularly changing public policy were also issues, noting the political discussion this week about potentially changing the link between rent and inflation because prices were rising.

Ms Hunt said investors were not going to come into a market where the rules kept changing halfway through the game.

She said that calling investors “vulture funds” was unhelpful and that name calling “in the media” should stop.

“We need that capital and we need that investment.”

She said investors who bought a nursing home or an office block were welcomed but that those who bought housing received very negative publicity “and they don’t need that”.

Take interest elsewhere

Pat O’Sullivan, head of real estate research at AIB, said policy changes were problematic and that the term “vulture fund” was offensive to investors, who could take their interest elsewhere.

He said Ireland isn’t the only economy that requires funding and “we have got to be very careful about the amount of changes we make to policy, how we describe the investment”.

Ms Hunt said that from a developer’s perspective, many housing schemes were not viable due to high construction and “input” costs and “because we have raised the bar so high in terms of the planning regime and design requirements”.

She instanced the judicial review process, which has been used to bring challenges to fast-track strategic planning developments, as another problem. Ms Hunt said “anecdotally” developers were hiring senior counsel and barristers ahead of planners and architects, such was the level of challenges.

The conference continues on Thursday.

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Should the developer pay for my drive’s missing dropped kerb?

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PROPERTY CLINIC: I bought a house with a drive that the developer never got a dropped kerb for, who is responsible for paying for one?

  • You have approached your local council about it paying for your kerb to be fixed 
  • The developer was issued with guidance by the local council to drop the kerb
  • No work has been carried out and the kerb needs to be dropped 










I bought a property that has a driveway without a dropped kerb. It is uncomfortable every time I drive over it. When I approached my local council about getting it fixed, it said the developer was under no obligation to drop the kerb. 

The council said I would have to apply for a licence to get it dropped. That licence costs £222.35. 

I will also have to pay for the work to be carried out. Is there anything I can do about this and why are developers allowed to build homes without dropped kerbs? MT

Parking space is at a premium and many want a drive, but you'll need a dropped kerb too

Parking space is at a premium and many want a drive, but you’ll need a dropped kerb too

MailOnline Property expert Myra Butterworth replies: Parking spaces are becoming highly desirable in many areas, as on-street parking restrictions proliferate.

Your developer was issued with guidance by the local council to drop the kerb. However, the local council in this case has confirmed that there is nothing in planning consent or elsewhere that required the developer to drop the kerb. 

Unfortunately, you have no claim against the original developer or the person from whom you bought the property. And so you will now need to apply to your local council for the kerb to be dropped.

Research by Direct Line found that during the past three years there has been a rise in the number of requests for dropped kerbs received by local councils amid an increasing demand for parking spaces.

Between April 2018 and March 2019, councils received an estimated 14,500 planning requests for dropped kerbs, rising to 14,700 between April 2020 and March 2021.

Stephen Gold, a retired judge and author, explained: Your local council is correct. In fact, it is sometimes necessary to also obtain planning permission for the construction of a dropped kerb: For example, if the kerb would be on a classified road or in a conservation area.

The fact that the all-clear has been given in the past to neighbouring properties for a dropped kerb is no guarantee that you will be as lucky because of changes in engineering standards and improvements in design. You may also be refused where, say, your property is on a bend or at a road junction or close to traffic lights.

The property was sold as it was, with no dropped kerb

The property was sold as it was, with no dropped kerb

You have no claim against the original developer or the person from whom you bought the property. 

The property was sold to you as it was: One driveway and no dropped kerb which would have been obvious, so you got what you bargained for. 

You would or should have contemplated that a drive from the property over the pavement might be an uncomfortable exercise. Had your seller agreed to bear the cost of construction of the kerb and associated expenses, the position would have been different.

But assuming that you bought with the help of a mortgage, the property would have been inspected by a valuer or surveyed on behalf of the mortgage lender and you may have organised your own private survey. 

If the process and expense of getting the all-clear for a dropped kerb was not raised in the inspection or survey report then you would have an arguable – although not a strong – claim against the report’s author or their employer. 

After all, section 184 of the Highways Act 1980 makes it an offence to drive over the pavement to get out of your property when the local authority has prohibited you from doing so in view of the absence of a dropped kerb and so this would have been an important matter.

You would have up to six years from the report to start what could be a county court ‘small claim’. You would be well advised to send details of the claim to whoever reported with a threat of proceedings if they do not pay up. If the claim is rejected by them, assess whether to take the matter further when you have the benefit of knowing why they assert they are not liable to you. 

Even making a small claims carries risks. You won’t get back the court fees if you lose and may have to pay the winner’s expenses for travel and loss of earnings in being at court.

  • Stephen Gold is the author of ‘The Return of Breaking Law’, published by Bath Publishing

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