Connect with us

Technology

Five ways colocation can drive enterprise transformation

Published

on

While enterprise transformation is challenging for many businesses, Interxion’s Séamus Dunne examines how colocation can reduce complexity.

Global trends and an expanding digital economy are forcing enterprises in every sector to think differently about how they do business and deliver value. It’s all about reaching new customers, embracing new technologies and delivering new services.

These changing business requirements inevitably lead to changes for IT and, most of the time, this means increasing the use of cloud through the implementation of hybrid and multicloud IT environments.

Enterprise transformation is the fundamental change to the way an organisation operates, whether that be moving into a new market or operating in a new way. It aims to align an organisation’s activities relating to people, process and technology more closely with its business strategy and vision.

Minimising complexity

However, the challenge is that most of today’s enterprise networks and on-premise data centres are not designed to support these new environments. They are not optimised to accommodate interactive workloads, third-party infrastructure, soaring network traffic or data generated far away from where it is collected and used.

Each new addition causes added complexity, with multiple layers resulting in issues with latency, governance and cost.

Colocation allows enterprises to manage the complex connectivity challenges that this transformation brings. Using colocation will enable organisations to utilise secure, scalable multi and hybrid cloud architectures and processes to address unique business requirements due to large scale transformation.

When thinking about enterprise transformation, there’s no magic bullet or one size fits all. Each organisation has its own unique challenges in reaching the goal of efficient, transparent, reliable multicloud management and operations, and it’s generally a long, multistep process that requires a lot of planning and care.

Here are five things to consider when making this decision.

1. Transformation

Change in any organisation can be difficult, particularly when it comes to IT. Colocation is a well-established approach to transform an IT organisation. With direct and secure access to all public clouds and an array of network carriers, enterprises can reduce the complexity of realising its business objectives.

Colocation removes almost every aspect of physical plant operation from operations – construction and building maintenance, physical security, power, cooling, emergency failover systems etc.

IT is therefore only responsible for installing and maintaining its compute and storage hardware. Many facilities also have various service and installation packages for common use cases such as backup and disaster recovery.

2. Cost

The move to colocation will likely require a thorough restructuring of IT costs. Long-accepted buying and planning cycles will likely need to change and many well-practiced workflows and purchase orders may go by the wayside.

Organisations need a realistic assessment of how much business process change the move will entail along with the associated costs. They should approach the move to colocation in a rational way and at a controlled pace.

3. Flexibility

Colocation services provide flexibility on service levels. Services can start and end with facilities operations and maintenance or extend to higher levels of managed services and hosted IT infrastructure, or some mix thereof.

This can make it possible to consolidate and streamline the enterprise data centre while maintaining legacy systems. Another aspect of flexibility is the ability to gain direct and secure access to multiple public cloud providers and carriers. This just isn’t a possibility with enterprise on-premise data centres.

4. Flow of information

Many providers have become de facto hubs of enterprise information flow. They support interconnection between public clouds and private and hosted private clouds, often in the same facility creating cost efficiencies.

Colocation makes connectivity simpler and more secure allowing enterprises optimise network performance by bypassing the public internet and instead privately connect to all the platform and service providers they need.

5. Efficiencies

Colocation providers cultivate close working relationships with major vendors and IT service providers. This can therefore help shorten deployment and migration scenarios significantly if the enterprise is willing to engage with those vendors with the colocation provider.

Colocation also provides ways to short-circuit common tasks during a cloud migration. Colocation facilities are heavily consumed by cloud and IT service providers and colocation providers cultivate close working relationships with major vendors and those same IT service providers.

Colocation is increasingly playing a key role as the intersection of a hybrid cloud strategy for enterprises. Providers’ ability to harness vendor partnerships and interconnection means they can play a key role in supporting hybrid, multicloud and digital transformation efforts.

The combination of public cloud interconnection, private cloud enablement, vendor partnerships and available services make colocation a realistic option for enterprises to attain the benefits of cloud computing.

Providers will continue to adopt and facilitate sophisticated software-driven technologies with technology vendors, which means the enterprise doesn’t have to.

By Séamus Dunne 

Séamus Dunne is the managing director of Interxion Ireland. A version of this article originally appeared on the Interxion blog.

Source link

Technology

Orion the humpback whale ‘a dream sighting’ for marine observers

Published

on

A member of the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group spotted the humpback whale while out conducting a survey on marine life off the Donegal coast.

Marine mammal observer Dr Justin Judge described the moment he spotted a lone humpback whale off the coast of Donegal as “a dream sighting.”

Judge spotted the whale at 9.30 on the morning of 9 July while representing the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) on board the Marine Institute’s RV Celtic Explorer.

The group of researchers and observers was out on the waters around 60 kilometres north-northwest of Malin Head when they saw the whale. They were carrying out the annual Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic (WESPAS) survey.

“This is a dream sighting for a marine mammal observer,” Judge said. He explained that the creature would be nicknamed Orion – which had a personal meaning for Judge and his family.

“The individual humpback whale ‘Orion’ has been named after the Greek mythological hunter, since the whale was moving with the fish stocks for food. It is also my son’s middle name so fitting on both fronts,” Judge said.

Support Silicon Republic

He added that the team had also observed “a lot of feeding action from a multitude of cetacean species that day, including bottlenose, common, Risso’s and white-sided dolphins, grey seals and minke whales.”

To date, the IWDG has documented 112 individual humpback whales in Irish waters since 1999, many of which are recorded year after year. Humpback whales are frequent visitors to Irish waters as they are an ideal feeding area for humpback whales stopping off in the area on their migration across the Atlantic.

The beasts are identifiable thanks to the distinctive pattern on the underside, which is unique to every individual whale.

“Observing any apex predator in its natural environment is exciting but a new humpback whale for Irish waters, this is special,” WESPAS survey scientist, Ciaran O’Donnell of the Marine Institute said.

The Marine Institute’s WESPAS survey is carried out annually, and surveys shelf seas from France northwards to Scotland, and west of Ireland. WESPAS is the largest single vessel survey of its kind in the Northeast Atlantic, covering upwards of 60,000 nautical miles every summer. The survey is funded through the European Maritime Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund under the Data Collection Programme which is run by the Marine Institute.

Source link

Continue Reading

Technology

Tesla second-quarter profits top $1bn even as it struggles to handle demand | Tesla

Published

on

Tesla made a profit of more than $1bn in the last three months even as it struggled to keep up with demand for electric cars in the face of a global chip shortage.

The company announced Monday that it has made a profit of $1.14bn in its second quarter, 10 times what it made a year ago and its eighth quarter of back-to-back profits.

Tesla has already reported deliveries of 201,250 electric vehicles, and production of 206,421 total vehicles, during the quarter ending 30 June.

Car manufacturers across the world have struggled to keep up with demand amid a shortfall of semiconductors.

“Our biggest challenge is supply chain, especially microcontroller chips. Never seen anything like it,” said Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, in June. “Fear of running out is causing every company to over-order – like the toilet-paper shortage, but at epic scale.”

The company has pivoted to using other suppliers and the shortage has not dampened enthusiasm for its vehicles, especially Tesla’s Model Y compact sport-utility vehicle, the most popular all-electric vehicle in the US.

“Public sentiment and support for electric vehicles seems to be at a never-before-seen inflection point,” the company said in a statement.

The company’s shares rose more than 2% in after hours trading.

Source link

Continue Reading

Technology

SSD belonging to Euro-cloud Scaleway was stolen from back of a truck, then turned up on YouTube • The Register

Published

on

In brief Deepmind and the European Bioinformatics Institute released a database of more than 350,000 3D protein structures predicted by the biz’s AI model AlphaFold.

That data covers the 20,000 or so proteins made in the human body, and is available for anyone to study. The proteomes of 20 other organisms, from Zebrafish to E.coli bacteria, are also in there, too, and hundreds of millions of more structures will be added over time, we’re told.

“In the hands of scientists around the world, this new protein almanac will enable and accelerate research that will advance our understanding of these building blocks of life,” said DeepMind’s CEO Demis Hassabis. He hopes that it will be a valuable resource that will be used in the discovery of new drugs and our understanding of diseases.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates 
directly on your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!