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Covid grips Europe’s unvaccinated east

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Hospitals are struggling to cope as Covid-19 sweeps through large unvaccinated populations in central and eastern Europe, where low levels of trust impeded acceptance of inoculation programmes.

Austria, Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands and others have teamed up to send oxygen supplies, medicines and ventilators to Romania after it appealed for help from the European Union to cope with a crushing fourth wave of the pandemic.

Just 36 per cent of adults are fully vaccinated in the country, according to EU figures, the second-lowest level in the union after Bulgaria, where the rate is just one in four adults, far below the pan-EU rate of 75 per cent.

Both countries are suffering a brutal surge of infections, hospitalisations and deaths. Romania has seen an average of more than 400 deaths a day for the past week, in a population of 19 million, the highest rate in the EU according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. In Bulgaria, in a population of seven million, more than 100 people have died on average each day for the past week.

Romania on Monday imposed a night-time curfew, shut schools and introduced mandatory Covid-19 passes for most public venues in a bid to curb the soaring infections as its intensive-care wards ran out of beds.

Reimpose restrictions

Infections are also soaring in the Baltic states of Lithuania and Latvia, which became the first European country to reimpose sweeping restrictions last week by shutting schools and all non-essential shops, and imposing a curfew from 8pm to 5am for a month. Restrictions were also tightened in the Czech Republic and in Slovakia.

In neighbouring Russia, daily Covid-19 infections reached a record high of 37,930 in 24 hours on Monday, and some regions shut workplaces in response.

World Health Organisation director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that with 50,000 Covid-19 deaths a week the pandemic was “far from over”, but he said it would end “when the world chooses to end it”.

“It is in our hands. We have all the tools we need,” he said. “Unlike so many other health challenges, we can prevent this. Complacency is now as dangerous as the virus.”

 In Austria, where 73 per cent of adults are fully vaccinated, chancellor Alexander Schallenberg warned that restrictions could be placed on the unvaccinated if Covid-19 patients began to take up the country’s ICU capacity.

“The pandemic is not yet in the rear view mirror,” Mr Schallenberg said. “We are about to stumble into a pandemic of the unvaccinated.”

He warned that if Covid-19 patients took up a quarter of national ICU beds, then only the vaccinated or people who had recovered from the virus would be allowed entry into restaurants and hotels. If the percentage reached a third, the unvaccinated would be allowed to leave home only for specific reasons.

Vaccination rates have reached above 90 per cent for those eligible in several countries in western Europe including Ireland, though coverage is lower in some cities and particular populations.

Hospitalisations

This is helping to keep hospitalisations under control, but infections are still rising and many countries have opted to continue with some precautions including mask-wearing, working from home recommendations, and mandatory Covid-19 passes in public settings. Last week, Italy made the passes mandatory for workplaces.

The WHO warned last week that Europe region was the only region in which Covid-19 cases were rising, led by surges in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland.

Emergencies chief Dr Mike Ryan appealed for the unvaccinated to come forward for jabs, and said the rise in infections came as restrictions were dropped in many countries, coinciding with “the winter period, in which people are moving inside as the cold snaps appear”.

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‘Colour drenching’ interiors trend sees walls, ceiling and woodwork painted the SAME colour

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Walls, ceiling and woodwork all painted in the same tone? It’s a bold approach, but the trend for ‘colour drenching’ is taking hold.

‘Softly, softly’ has largely been the approach to painted walls in recent years, but that’s about to change. 

Many of us who spent more time at home during the pandemic experienced a desire to express ourselves through our interiors, and paint colour is an easy way to inject personality.

Blended: A dining room drenched in shades of blue. It's a bold approach but the trend for 'colour drenching' is taking hold, according to interiors experts

Blended: A dining room drenched in shades of blue. It’s a bold approach but the trend for ‘colour drenching’ is taking hold, according to interiors experts

‘We’re seeing a more liberal use of a single colour in our recent projects,’ says Rosie Ward, creative director at Ward & Co. 

‘Known as ‘colour drenching’, the concept might seem daunting at first, but when executed thoughtfully, it can give a home a wonderful sense of cohesion, character and flow as well as creating a surprisingly calming atmosphere.’

Select a shade 

Whether you choose a soothing mid-tone or a bold, all-enveloping colour, the idea is to drench your space in one hue — or tonal variations of it — from walls and ceiling to woodwork, the inside of doorways, window frames and even radiators.

‘Using a single shade in this way adds a feeling of grandeur as well as providing a chic, minimalist base,’ says Benjamin Moore’s Helen Shaw.

‘Varying levels of saturation can be a great way to take your home from bland to bold, as well as instantly shifting a room’s dimensions.’

 If your home lacks features, colour drenching is a great way to add impact.’

Roby Baldan, interior designer 

Colour drenching can work with any colour, but it does require thought and a full-on rather than half-hearted approach. Deep shades of blue or green can work beautifully in kitchens; blood-red can be enlivening in studies, cloakrooms and cosy living spaces — especially those that face north. 

For a subtle approach, a dusty pink drench works beautifully in sitting rooms and hallways, and pairs naturally with aged brass or gold fittings.

‘Using the same shade throughout helps flatten less appealing features, like radiators, making them disappear into the background,’ says interior designer Roby Baldan. 

‘A single shade makes the perimeter of the room recede and everything else stand out. In period homes, you can use a different tone to highlight architectural elements for a look that’s both modern and dramatic.

‘If your home lacks features, colour drenching is a great way to add impact.’

Work it like a pro

There are a few things to bear in mind to make this look a success.

First, choose the right tone. ‘Bold, saturated jewel greens and teals work very well,’ says Crown’s Justyna Korczynska. ‘Dark greys to near black and deep navy shades are also good choices. But avoid super-brights, as they can be overpowering.’

If you are a little hesitant, start with a small space such as a cloakroom.

‘Select three variations of your chosen colour, ranging from pale to deep,’ advises Roby. ‘Look at the amount of natural light available. Some rooms are suited to pale colours, while others need deep shades.

‘If the room gets plenty of light, select the palest shade as the primary wall colour, choosing darker tones for features. If the room is dark, use the darker shades as the main colour and the palest for the trim.’

How to coordinate 

A fashion-forward option is to complement colour drenched walls with furniture for bold cohesion. This is a look that works in kitchens too — deVol’s new Heirloom range looks great in a deep burgundy finish against pale pink walls.

Sometimes, picking out a colour from a key piece of artwork is all it takes to kickstart your scheme.

Furniture, curtains, cushions, lamps, rugs, accessories and even flowers can be used to intensify the look, but stick to no more than a couple of different colours to avoid visual overload. 

This is a statement trend that’s all about sticking to your guns — commit to the look fully and you won’t go wrong.

What your home needs is a… festive table runner 

Detail: The Nathalie Lete Table Runner costs £58 (anthropologie.com)

Detail: The Nathalie Lete Table Runner costs £58 (anthropologie.com)

Some people refuse to step into Christmas until the last minute. Others deck the halls at the earliest opportunity. 

If you prefer the festive middle ground, but still want to bring cheer to your interior before you break out the baubles, your home needs a Christmas table runner.

If you like an understated Yuletide style, the £14.95 Not On The High Street beige linen runner decorated with snowflakes should suit.

H&M Home’s £6 plain red runner would serve as a base for greenery, colourful napkins and candlesticks. 

If you want more adornment, options include the £58 Nathalie Lete Table Runner. Wayfair has a £13.99 runner with a grey stag’s head.

But there are also opportunities to go over the top. At Lakeland, you can find a £14.99 gold glitter runner while Marks & Spencer can supply a £25 runner with sequins in red or white, or another, in red and grey and also costing £25, with lights operated by batteries. Ho, ho, ho.

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Elderly man who remained unidentified in psychiatric hospital for 30 years has died

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An elderly man who remained unidentified in a psychiatric hospital here for 30 years has died and a DNA sample taken post-mortem is now being used in a bid to identify him.

Believed to be aged in his eighties or nineties, the man died at the hospital, which cannot be identified by High Court order, on September 23rd.

After his death was notified to the relevant coroner, he authorised the taking of a DNA sample for the purpose of establishing the man’s identity and gardai are now using the sample in an effort to identify the man.

He was made a ward of court in May 2020 year because his health was declining.

He was first admitted to the hospital after being taken there by gardai in the mid 1980s.

He was reported to be living “a hermit’s life” and sleeping rough in a bus shelter with a dog whom he said he had “on loan”. He also referred to living in Dublin “for years”.

At some point after his admission, he was given a name and estimated date of birth of 1930.

Despite some efforts to establish his true identity and find a next of kin, he essentially remained a ‘John Doe’. He had a history of mental illness, along with physical health conditions.

The wardship application was initiated by the HSE because his physical health was deteriorating and he had had a number of hospital admissions.

His clinical team considered it would not be appropriate to resuscitate him should his condition deteriorate further to a point where resuscitation is required.

Comfortable

Rather than a further hospital admission, they said he should be made comfortable where he is.

The man had expressed a desire not to be sent to a general hospital should his condition deteriorate but doctors were concerned if he had capacity to make decisions about his health and wanted to ensure any decision against resuscitation should have a legal basis.

In September 2020, the High Court was satisfied, on an independent medical visitor’s report and other medical evidence, the man lacked capacity and should be taken into wardship.

His court appointed guardian, solicitor William Leahy, reported the man was incapable of giving expression to his views and appeared to have effectively made staff and other patients at the hospital his family. Staff were said to be very fond of him.

At a later hearing, for reasons including the man previously indicated to hospital staff he did not wish to be identified, the HSE’s counsel David Leahy said it was not seeking to take a DNA sample while he is still alive.

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These little-known towns and villages have become pandemic property hotspots

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Moving to the country became every city-dweller’s daydream during Covid, with some 700,000 people quitting London for the good life.

Cornwall, the most searched for place on Rightmove, was a favourite destination, while searches for the Cotswolds more than doubled. 

Yet it wasn’t just these two expensive destinations that saw their popularity soar.

Escape to the country: Llangollen on the River Dee in Denbighshire, North Wales, is popular with tourists

Escape to the country: Llangollen on the River Dee in Denbighshire, North Wales, is popular with tourists

Estate agents Hamptons discovered four relatively anonymous regions which, due to Covid, have become property hotspots, recording staggering price increases for 2020-2021.

In demand Daventry: Price growth 17 per cent

Although a pleasant market town, it’s unlikely anyone would describe Daventry, in West Northamptonshire, as a ‘beauty’. Could Hamptons have been mistaken when they named it the No 1 hotspot?

‘Absolutely not,’ says Natasha Cawsey, of Laurence Tremayne estate agents. ‘Our figures show growth of about 30 per cent in the past 18 months.

‘Daventry has good amenities, yet prices are well below those in neighbouring Oxfordshire and Warwickshire.’

The villages outside Daventry are also an attraction. Braunston, on the hill above the two canals, has a busy marina and Everdon is lovely.

‘These gorgeous villages are 30 per cent cheaper than the Cotswolds,’ says property search agent Jonathan Harrington. ‘They have excellent communications, making them ideal for people who work from home.’

Desired Denbighshire: Price growth 15 per cent

The remarkable price growth in Denbighshire, a low-profile county in North Wales extending inland from the Irish Sea, is largely down to Covid.

‘Nearly all my buyers in the past 18 months have been southerners in search of open space,’ says Mark Gilbertson of Fine & Country. 

‘They can walk out of their doors here and meet nobody, which makes them feel safe.’ 

Ruthin has been described as ‘the most charming small town in Wales’ by National Trust chairman Simon Jenkins. 

Llangollen, with its colourful craft on the canal and River Dee, is popular with tourists.

Denbighshire has become so popular, according to Gilbertson, that some wealthy buyers hire helicopters in their rush to view homes like this.

Rutland rockets: Price growth 14 per cent

It may be England’s smallest county, tucked away in the East Midlands, but Rutland’s property prices have boomed since the lockdowns.

‘Lots of our buyers have looked first in the Cotswolds,’ says Jan von Draczek, of Fine & Country estate agents. 

‘Finding nothing suitable for sale they spread their nets wider and discover Rutland.’

Rutland Water, the largest reservoir in England, is a popular with bird watchers and used for watersports and fishing. 

Rutland Water, the largest reservoir in England, is a popular with bird watchers and used for watersports and fishing

Rutland Water, the largest reservoir in England, is a popular with bird watchers and used for watersports and fishing

Villages are speckled with stone cottages under roofs of collyweston slate.

Barrowden, with its Grade II-listed church, is charming while Exton with its green overlooked by the Fox & Hounds pub is pure chocolate box. 

Much of Rutland is within easy reach of Peterborough, 50 minutes from King’s Cross.

Vale of Glamorgan value: Price growth 14 per cent

Drive west along the M4 and you won’t find a signpost for the Vale of Glamorgan, yet this strip of land to the west of Cardiff has seen the most dramatic property price appreciation in Wales.

‘The Vale has always been home for businessmen based in Cardiff,’ says Robert Calcaterra, of HRT estate agents. ‘Now we are also getting incomers from London who snap up the £1 million-plus homes.’

Cowbridge — with its hotel, The Bear, where Tom Jones stops for a pint when he is home — oozes affluence and nearby you find pretty villages like Bonvilston, St Hilary and Llantwit Major before you hit the beautiful Heritage Coast. 

Be warned: 70 per cent of homes advertised are under offer in this booming market. 

On the market… and in demand 

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