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Christmas gifts: the best tech gadgets for all the family | Consumer affairs

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If you are stuck for ideas for Christmas gifts this year and looking for something more exciting than socks, here are some gadgets that might be just the ticket.

From folding phones, headphones and VR headsets to smart speakers and eco-friendly phone cases, all of these great gadgets are excellent, built to last and won’t end up languishing in a drawer or, worse, the bin.

Fairphone 4 smartphone

fairphone 4
The Fairphone 4 is a modern 5G Android phone that is ethically produced and repairable at home. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £499

The most ethical, repairable smartphone you can buy someone has had a big upgrade for 2021 and has a more modern design, 5G and faster chips. The Fairphone 4 is built to last, with software support until 2027 and a five-year warranty.

It still contains plenty of recycled and ethically sourced materials, has modular parts you can replace yourself with just one small screwdriver, and a removable battery, which is good for about two days.

The camera is still a work in progress, there’s no headphone jack and it isn’t the fastest smartphone you can get but it does the job with little fuss. Fairphone will recycle an equivalent device for each unit sold, making the phone e-waste neutral, too. You are paying about £200 more than for a comparable phone from the company’s rivals but that helps pay the factory workers who make the Fairphone a real living wage.

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 smartphone

samsung galaxy z flip 3
The Galaxy Z Flip 3 has one long screen that folds in half like a makeup compact. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £949 – deals from £799

Not only is the Z Flip 3 a cutting-edge piece of technology but it’s a great phone to boot. Samsung’s reinvention of the flip phone puts a 6.7in flexible screen in the centre of a classic clamshell design, giving it the best of both worlds: a big, luscious screen to rival superphones and a compact size, which means you can actually fit it in your pocket when folded up.

Good cameras, top performance and good software with at least four years of updates, plus water resistance mean you are not losing anything compared with normal phones that cost just as much. Plus, there is something very satisfying about closing the phone to hang up on a call.

If you need an even bigger display, Samsung’s Galaxy Z Fold 3 puts a folding tablet screen in your pocket, too.

Apple iPad (9th gen) tablet

apple ipad 9th generation
The 10.2in iPad is all the tablet most need for watching TV, browsing the web and viewing photos. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £319

When it comes to a tablet for watching TV, playing games and reading the Guardian, Apple’s basic iPad is the best option for most people. The recycled aluminium body is solid, the 10.2in screen is good and the speakers are decent. The powerful chip, long battery life and 64GB of storage will be enough for apps and games. Very long software support means the tablet will last years, too.

The brilliant new 12-megapixel “Centre Stage” camera automatically pans and scans to keep you in view for video calls. Apple’s App Store has all the media and tablet apps you could want, and accessories such as keyboards and cases are widely available if you want to use it more as a computer.

Apple MacBook Air M1

apple macbook air
The MacBook Air is thin, light, powerful, lasts a long time on battery and is made out of recycled aluminium. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £999 – deals from £850

Apple’s switch from Intel processors to M1 chips of its own design has transformed the MacBook Air from a low-power thin and light machine into the best consumer laptop you can buy. The M1 chip is superfast and powerful but enables gamechanging battery life in excess of 16 hours of work – multiple days away from the charger are now possible.

It has no fan, so runs totally silently, the screen is great, the keyboard and trackpad are first class, the sleek body is made out of recycled aluminium and it contains recycled tin and plastic, too.

The webcam isn’t the best and it only has two USB-C/Thunderbolt ports but you have to spend a significant amount more to beat the M1 MacBook Air.

Ikea Symfonisk picture frame wifi speaker

Ikea Symfonisk picture frame
This picture frame hides an excellent Sonos wifi speaker behind a piece of art. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £179

Ikea’s partnership with the wifi-speaker maker Sonos has created some novel devices. Following on from a shelf and a lamp that double as speakers, comes the Symfonisk picture frame, which hides a speaker behind art on your wall – and it sounds surprisingly good.

It can be hung or leant against the wall, streams music over wifi from almost any music service available and can even be linked up wirelessly as a pair with another or as part of a seamless multiroom audio system. It still needs a power cable running down your wall but you get a choice of white or black frames and the art print can be swapped out easily for a choice of others – though not yet your own print.

Sonos Roam speaker

sonos roam
The Sonos Roam is a portable speaker that sounds so good you will want to use it at home, too. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £179

Most Bluetooth speakers are fine on the road but are immediately relegated to a drawer when you get home. Not so the Sonos Roam, which works so well you’ll want to use it in the house, too.

It has wifi for directly streaming music at home, supporting practically every music service under the sun and Alexa or Google Assistant voice control. It has Bluetooth, too, for hooking up your phone on the road. It is water-resistant, durable, light and compact but packs a big, quality sound. It lasts 10 hours on battery, charged via USB-C or wireless charging in the base. It can even be part of a multiroom audio setup with other Sonos speakers. Sonos promises to support the Roam for at least five years after it stops being sold but has a history of doing so for much longer and you can get the battery replaced if it wears out.

Sony WH-1000XM4 headphones

sony wh-1000xm4
Sony’s top noise-cancelling headphones are available in a range of colours, not only grey. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £259 – deals from £249

Sony’s top wireless headphones have an unwieldy name but are absolutely fantastic. They are superlight and comfortable even for extended listening sessions, have 30+ hours of battery life, are available in a choice of colours and fold up neatly for travel.

They have extremely effective noise-cancelling that works equally on flights or a commute. They also sound brilliant, producing the kind of sparkling audio that will have you discovering new details in well-worn tracks. They have a great set of touch controls for playback and volume, plus they can connect to two devices simultaneously via Bluetooth but have a cable, too. They are even repairable and you can replace the battery if it wears out, which is rare in the world of headphones.

Audio-Technica ATH-M50x headphones

Audio-Technica ATH-MX50x
Available in black or a series of special colours including metallic orange, these headphones are studio legends for a reason: they sound great. Photograph: Audio Technica

RRP: £130 – deals from £105

If you want to give a set of wired headphones that sound great and will go the distance, you can’t go far wrong with these. Super comfortable with spacious ear cups and a well-padded headband, they sound brilliant with neutral, balanced audio that has made them extremely popular with music producers. Crank up the music and enjoy. Their closed-back design stops everyone else from being able to hear what you are listening to but they can only block a small amount of outside noise. They fold up fairly compactly and feel as if they can take a beating.

The cable is removable and the headphones are generally repairable, so if something does break you don’t have to bin them. Audio-Technica also makes a version with Bluetooth for a little more money.

Samsung Galaxy Buds 2 headphones

samsung galaxy buds 2
The Galaxy Buds 2 are Samsung’s best true-wireless earbuds yet. Photograph: Samsung

RRP: £139 – deals from £99

Samsung’s latest true wireless earbuds are its best yet. They don’t skimp on features, with a solid Bluetooth 5.2 connection, good active noise-cancelling for blocking out the commute and great sound. They have good touch controls for playback, last for up to five hours of music and charge fully three times in the compact case.

The app for updates is only available on Android and they are only splashproof. But they are more repairable than most true wireless earbuds, so it is possible to replace the battery and fix them if something does go wrong.

Apple Watch Series 7

apple watch series 7
The Apple Watch Series 7 is the best smartwatch but only works with an iPhone. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £369

The best smartwatch you can get for an iPhone. Its big screen, comfortable fit, 50m water resistance and slick performance are unrivalled. It doesn’t hurt that it has some of the most comprehensive health and fitness tracking features available, including the ability to take an ECG. It is made of recycled aluminium and has a reasonable selection of third-party apps, too, including Spotify with offline music downloads. If you don’t want the ECG or an always-on screen the Watch SE is cheaper at £249.

Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 4 is the best smartwatch for Android and is about 80% as good as the Apple Watch, with most of the same health-tracking features and a more traditional round watch shape for £219.

Oculus (Meta) Quest 2 VR headset

oculus quest 2
There’s nothing quite like the PC and cable-free experience of VR in the Quest 2 for escapism. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £299

The Oculus Quest 2 from Meta (AKA Facebook) is a breakthrough in virtual reality headsets that jettisoned the need for cables and a powerful PC to create a simple, immersive set of goggles you can just strap on to enter a completely different world. The headset is powerful enough to make the experience smooth and convincing. It is pretty light and comfortable. The battery lasts about three hours, and there’s an ever growing library of games and experiences, including from big-name brands such as Star Wars, Beat Saber and Resident Evil.

The recipient will need a Facebook account and enough space to walk and swing their arms around but there’s nothing quite like it for escapism.

Google Nest Hub 2

Google nest hub 2
The Nest Hub 2 tracks sleep using radar rather than a gadget on the wrist and makes a great photo frame. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £90 – deals from £54

Google’s second-generation Nest Hub puts the company’s voice assistant in a good-looking 7in smart display made from 54% recycled plastic. With no camera to worry about, it makes a good alarm clock. It can wake you with a sunrise effect and sound, and you can silence alarms by waving your hand at it. It also features radar-based sleep tracking with no need to wear a gadget. The screen can be a brilliant digital photo frame for all your favourite snaps.

Google Assistant is useful, and the speaker’s pretty good, able to play radio including BBC, Spotify and others, or stream music via Bluetooth from your phone, making it just as good in the lounge or kitchen.

Amazon Echo Dot

amazon echo dot
The fourth-generation Echo Dot is available with or without an LED display for the time. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

RRP: £49.99 – deals from £29

As a small smart speaker to play music and the radio, set timers and answer questions, the cute ball-shaped Echo Dot is great. Simply ask Alexa for BBC or commercial radio and you’re away. The speaker is better than competitors’ and loud enough for small rooms. You can turn two into a stereo pair. It supports most common music services over wifi, or you can connect your phone via Bluetooth or the 3.5mm analogue jack on the back.

It comes with or without a hidden LED display for the time or alarms, and contains recycled fabric, plastic and aluminium.

Logitech MX Keys Mini keyboard

logitech mx keys mini
Attractive and with excellent typing and key feel, there aren’t many slimline keyboards better than the MX Keys Mini. Photograph: Logitech

RRP: £99 – deals from £87

Working from home can be a bit of a drag, so adding a little bit of luxury to the computer your loved one is stuck in front of for hours on end can make it a little more bearable for them. Logitech’s latest rechargeable Bluetooth keyboard is a compact version of its brilliant MX Keys. With some of the best laptop-style typing you can get, it makes every key-press responsive and satisfying, while not taking up too much room on a desk.

It is made from up to 30% recycled plastic, works with multiple platforms and can pair to up to three devices at once, quickly switching between them at the press of a key, has an automatic backlight and plenty of customisation options, too.

Microsoft Ocean Plastic Mouse

microsoft ocean plastic mouse
This Bluetooth mouse is made from recycled plastic bottles taken from the ocean. Photograph: Microsoft

RRP: £25

The Ocean Plastic Mouse is a special edition of Microsoft’s Bluetooth Mouse, which is made with 20% recycled plastic cleared from the ocean and given a cool speckled look. It will last up to 12 months on an AA battery (use a rechargeable) and you can mail an old mouse to Microsoft for recycling.

Targus EcoSmart laptop bag range

Targus Cypress Security EcoSmart
The Targus Cypress Security EcoSmart is made from 17 recycled plastic bottles. Photograph: Targus

RRP: £49.99

When it comes to bags to truck gear around there are plenty of options but few have quite such a storied history as Targus – the inventor of the first personal computer carrying case in 1982. The latest EcoSmart range of Targus laptop bags includes backpacks, cases and sleeves, which are made from up to 26 recycled plastic bottles each.

Pela phone cases

pela pink peaks iPhone case
Pela cases come in a variety of coloured and clear designs for a large range of smartphones and other gadgets. Photograph: Pela

RRP: £28 and up

Pela makes good-looking cases that add grip and drop protection to your phone – and don’t have to end up as landfill once you’re done with them. The cases look and feel like fancy regular plastic cases but are made from a starch-based polymer mixed with flax straw, which makes them more environmentally friendly to produce and compostable at the end of their life.

Cases are available for a large range of phones, with various clear and arty designs to choose from.

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4 reasons hybrid working looks set to stay for young professionals

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From priorities to practicalities, Dr Amanda Jones of King’s College London explains why hybrid working may be here to stay and outlines the pitfalls that younger employees will need to avoid.

Click here to visit The Conversation.

A version of this article was originally published by The Conversation (CC BY-ND 4.0)

We’re in the middle of a remote working revolution. In the UK, though remote working was slowly growing before the pandemic, in 2020 the number of people working from home doubled.

While this rapid rise can be explained by Covid lockdowns, a recent survey my colleagues and I conducted with 2,000 London workers found that six in 10 employees still regularly work from home despite restrictions no longer being in place. And most don’t want that to change.

Findings from other parts of the world similarly point to a substantial increase in the number of work days being undertaken from home.

For young professionals, the shift has been particularly significant. Before the pandemic, employees in their 20s were by far the least likely to work from home.

In 2022, 64pc of 16 to 24-year-olds we surveyed reported working at home for at least part of the week. This figure is in line with 25 to 49-year-olds (65pc) and in fact higher than for people over 50 (48pc).

Other research also shows that young professionals now engage in hybrid working – dividing their time between their home and their workplace – and may prefer this model to being in the office full time.

US and European data shows that around four in 10 jobs can be conducted from home. But this figure may be higher if we consider that some jobs could be at least partly done from home. In particular, jobs in finance and insurance, information and communication and education are among the most conducive to being performed remotely.

Technologies which support remote working, such as Zoom and Slack, have been available for a number of years. While the pandemic has served as a catalyst for the rise in remote working among younger employees, I would argue that other factors have also contributed to this shift – some of which were already evident before the pandemic.

Importantly, each of these factors suggest this change to the way young professionals work is here to stay.

1. Priorities

Evidence suggests that even before the pandemic, young people were becoming more focused on their own goals, wanted greater flexibility and control, and sought a better work-life balance compared with previous generations. The reasons for this may be related to the changing nature of organisations and careers, which I’ll discuss later.

Our own and other research indicates that remote working, especially working from home (as opposed to, say, at client sites), can boost feelings of flexibility and control and enhance work-life balance. So working remotely could help younger people achieve these goals in a way that traditional working arrangements can’t.

In fact, research indicates that many young people would now rather switch jobs than compromise on the flexibility they gain from hybrid working. So for employers, supporting hybrid working may be necessary to attract and retain the best employees.

2. Practicalities

Across all age groups, participants in our research picked avoiding the commute as the biggest benefit of working remotely. While this has long been a recognised advantage of remote working, it’s important to note that we surveyed London workers – and the commute may be less of an issue for people in other places.

Aside from the time and hassle involved in commuting, travelling to work every day can be expensive. The cost of working in the office goes up if you also factor in lunches, coffees and after-work social activities.

This may be difficult for younger people – who are contending with the rising costs of living, often on lower salaries – to manage. Working remotely can help reduce spending, making it an attractive option – and even a potential lifeline – for younger employees.

3. Career trajectories

Studies show that a move towards less hierarchical, more efficient and flexible organisations results in a “new deal” of employment. Employers no longer guarantee job security and progression for employees, but gain their commitment by providing opportunities – including training programmes – that enhance their employability.

The onus then moves to employees to manage their own career progression, which remote working may help them with. For example, we know working from home can reduce distractions and improve productivity.

Taken with the commuting time saved, young professionals may have more time to dedicate to development opportunities, such as studying for additional qualifications. This could increase their attractiveness in the job market.

Indeed, young professionals seem to be the most likely to switch jobs. If they don’t expect to remain with an organisation long term, they may be less motivated to build strong relationships with colleagues and managers, and unwilling to put their own goals aside for those of the organisation.

4. Managers’ behaviour

Research shows many more managers now work remotely compared with before the pandemic. This change has two important effects.

First, managers who work remotely are likely to find it harder to stop juniors from doing the same. Managers’ ability to monitor and develop their junior staff in person, a common reason for prohibiting remote work in the past, is also reduced if managers are away from the office themselves.

Second, as more managers work remotely, younger employees may feel more confident that doing so won’t prevent them achieving success. Managers serve as role models to junior employees and evidence shows that younger professionals seek success by copying role models’ behaviour.

Avoiding the pitfalls of hybrid working

Despite the positives, younger employees, with comparatively limited experience and networks, may face disproportionately negative outcomes from remote working in terms of recognition, development and networking opportunities.

So if you’re a young professional working remotely, how can you avoid the pitfalls of hybrid working?

Setting your own goals can keep motivation and performance high. Meanwhile, proactively communicating your challenges and achievements to senior and peer-level colleagues can ensure that you receive guidance and recognition.

It’s a good idea to plan some of your time in the office to coordinate with team members or managers. At the same time, it’s useful to try to schedule office visits on different days of the week. This can help maintain key relationships but also help build networks through bumping into colleagues you don’t necessarily work as closely with.

Finally, upping attendance at external conferences and events could increase your value to the organisation through encouraging innovation and fresh ideas, while keeping you aware of external employment opportunities.

The Conversation

By Dr Amanda Jones

Dr Amanda Jones is a lecturer in organisational behaviour and human resource management at King’s College London.

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Kids’ tech: the best children’s gadgets for summer holidays | Gadgets

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With the long school summer holiday well under way, you may need a bit of help keeping the kids entertained. From walkie-talkies and cameras to tablets, robot toys and fitness trackers, here are some of the best kid-aimed tech to keep the little (and not-so-little) ones occupied.

Robot toys

Sphero Mini – about £50

Sphero Mini robotic ball.
Sphero Mini robotic ball. Photograph: Bryan Rowe/Sphero

Lots of tech toys are fads but my longtime favourite has stood the test of time as a modern update to remote control fun. Sphero is a ball you control using a smartphone or tablet, and has hidden depths, with games and educational elements also available.

The mini Sphero ball is a lot of fun to drive around and small enough that overexuberant indoor excursions won’t result in broken furniture and scuffed-up paintwork. The Sphero Play app has games, while the Sphero Edu app is great at fostering creative learning.

Kids or big kids can learn to program, follow examples, get the robot to do all sorts of things, or go deeper and write some code for it in JavaScript. Higher-end versions such as the £190 BOLT take the educational elements to the next level, too.

Tablets

Amazon Fire 7 Kids – about £110

Amazon Fire 7 Kids edition tablet.
Amazon Fire 7 Kids edition tablet. Photograph: Amazon

If you would rather not lend your precious breakable phone or iPad to your little ones, Amazon’s practically indestructible Kids edition tablets could be just the ticket.

The cheapest and smallest Fire 7 has just been updated and is available in a range of bright-coloured cases with a pop-out stand. If your offspring do manage to break it, Amazon will replace it for free under its two-year “worry-free” guarantee.

It does all the standard tablet things such as movies, apps, games, a web browser if you want it, and parental controls to lock it, set time limits and age filters. There’s even an option restricting access to curated child-safe sites and videos but it doesn’t have access to the Google Play store, only Amazon’s app store.

The Kids edition comes with a one-year subscription to Amazon Kids+ (£3 to £7 a month afterwards), which is a curated collection of child-friendly text and audio books, movies, TV shows and educational apps.

The larger £140 Fire HD 8 and £200 Fire HD 10 are available in Kids versions, too, if you want something bigger, or Amazon’s new Kids Pro tablets start at £100 with additional features aimed at school-age children.

Alternatives include LeapFrog’s various educational tablets, which are fine for younger children, or hand-me-down or refurbished iPads (from £150) in robust cases, which can be locked down with some parental controls.

Cameras

VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 – about £39

VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 kids’ camera in pink.
VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 kids’ camera in pink. Photograph: VTech

Before the advent of smartphones, standalone cameras were the way we visually documented our lives, and they still can be a bit of creative fun and inspiration for kids.

The VTech Kidizoom Duo 5.0 is a “my first digital camera” of sorts made of rugged plastic and simple in operation, which VTech reckons is suitable for three- to nine-year-olds. It captures 5MP photos of reasonable quality and can shoot from the back for selfies, too, all viewable on a 2.4in screen.

The optical viewfinder helps them line up the shot, which they can transform with fun filters and effects. It even shoots video, too. The kid-centric nature of it might turn off older children but every award-winning photographer has to start somewhere before the smartphone takes over.

It needs an SD card for storage and takes four AA batteries at a time, and chews through them fast, so buy some rechargeables to help save money and the planet.

For older children, rugged and waterproof action cams could be the way to go, shooting video and photos. Budget no-brand cams cost from about £80 but secondhand or refurbished models from the big boys such as GoPro and DJI go for about £100 and on eBay and elsewhere.

Fitness trackers

Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 – from about £55

Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 Star Wars edition.
Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 Star Wars edition. Photograph: Garmin

Your child may not need any encouragement to tear about the place but if you are after a gadget to “gamify” and reward their activity – as well as giving them a smartwatch-esque gadget to play with – the Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 could be a winner for ages four and up.

Its watch-like form comes in various themes and designs, including with various Star Wars, Marvel and Disney characters, with custom watchfaces to choose from. The user-replaceable coin-cell battery lasts a year, so you don’t have to worry about charging it. Water-resistance to 50 metres means swimming should be no problem either.

It tracks steps, activity and sleep with motivational messaging. It has mini games to play once your child has hit their goals, and can all be managed from a parent’s phone or tablet, so you can keep an eye on their data. Parents can even set goals, competitions with their own activity levels, chore reminders and tasks that can earn virtual coins for them to trade for rewards with you.

It is button-operated rather than touchscreen, and the backlight doesn’t stay on long to preserve the battery.

If you are a user of Google’s Fitbit trackers yourself, then the firm’s Ace 3 (£50) means you can compete on activity, but it needs charging every seven or so days. Other cheaper adult-focused fitness trackers such as the Xiaomi Mi Smart Band 6 (about £29) may be better for older children.

Walkie-talkies

Motorola T42 Talkabout – about £35 for three

Motorola Talkabout T42 two-way radios.
Motorola Talkabout T42 two-way radios. Photograph: Motorola Solutions

Walkie-talkies are a great replacement for phones, allowing kids and big kids to keep in touch without fear of fees or smashed screens.

There are plenty of child-centric options available with various character themes but basic units usually work better. Motorola’s T42 Talkabout comes in various colours and multipacks.

They are simple to set up, with a pairing button and multiple channel selection to find a clear one. Once going, just push to talk, even over long distances. Their quoted 4km range might be a bit ambitious but they should be good for at least 500 metres in urban environments, or much further in the open air.

They take three AAA batteries each, which last about 18 hours of talking or roughly three to four days in active use, so you might need a small army of rechargeable batteries.

They have a belt clip and loop for hooking to a carabiner (metal loop) or similar, and are fairly rugged, too, so should survive being launched across a room or two.

Nestling’s camouflage walkie-talkies (about £26) are also a popular choice but there are lots of choices under £30 available on the high street.

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India’s latest rocket flies but payloads don’t prosper • The Register

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India’s small satellite launch vehicle (SSLV) made a spectacular debut launch on Sunday, but the mission fell short of overall success when two satellites were inserted into the incorrect orbit, rendering them space junk.

The SSLV was developed to carry payloads of up to 500 kg to low earth orbits on an “on-demand basis”. India hopes the craft will let its space agency target commercial launches.

Although it is capable of achieving 500 km orbits, SSLV’s Saunday payload was an 135 kg earth observation satellite called EOS-2 and student-designed 8 kg 8U cubesat AzaadiSAT. Both were intended for a 356 km orbit at an inclination of about 37 degrees.

That rocket missed that target.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) identified the root cause of the failure Sunday night: a failure of logic to identify a sensor failure during the rocket stage.

ISRO further tweeted a committee would analyse the situation and provide recommendations as the org prepared for SSLV-D2.

ISRO Chairman S Somanath further explained the scenario in a video statement, before vowing to become completely successful in the second development flight of SSLV. “The vehicle took off majestically,” said Somanath who categorized the three rocket stages and launch as a success.

“However, we subsequently noticed an anomaly in the placement of the satellites in the orbit. The satellites were placed in an elliptical orbit in place of a circular orbit,” caveated the chairman.

Somanath said the satellites could not withstand the atmospheric drag in the elliptical orbit and had already fallen and become “no longer usable.” The sensor isolation principle is to be corrected before SSLV’s second launch to occur “very soon.”

Although ISRO has put on a brave face, its hard to imagine the emotions of the school children who designed AzaadiSat. According to the space org, the satellite was built by female students in rural regions across the country, with guidance and integrated by the student team of of student space-enthusiast org Space Kidz India.

EOS-2 was designed by ISRO and was slated to offer advanced optical remote sensing in infra-red band with high spatial resolution. ®



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