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Bizarre design fails from a piano on the ceiling to a taxidermy room

Crimes against design! Bizarre real estate photos reveal some of the strangest properties on the market – from a taxidermy gallery to a CASTLE on top of a garage

  • Bizarre design fails from houses around the world were shared on social media
  • Among the unusual choices were a 20,000 fish tank and a piano on the ceiling
  • Another house had an indoor rockery next to fake birds and wildlife paintings










When it comes to selling a property, many homeowners want their place to stand out from the rest. 

But these places from around the world are memorable for all the wrong reasons. 

The photos, originally posted on the Ridiculous Real Estate Reddit thread and collated by Bored Panda, feature some design choices that are just too weird to even comprehend.

One picture shows a house that looks unassuming and normal on the outside, but is lavishly decked out with giant chandeliers and other decadent touches inside.

Another shows an indoor putting green, while a further image freaked out social media users, showing a room completely stuffed with taxidermy animals.

Here FEMAIL shares some of the most bizarre design fails ever pictured… 

Some decor is simply inexplicable: this indoor rockery surrounded by wildlife photos and fake animals certainly fits that mould

Some decor is simply inexplicable: this indoor rockery surrounded by wildlife photos and fake animals certainly fits that mould

It's not often you see a piano stuck to the ceiling instead of standing on the floor - after all, sitting underneath that would be terrifying!

It’s not often you see a piano stuck to the ceiling instead of standing on the floor – after all, sitting underneath that would be terrifying!

This home may look fairly unassuming on the outside, but peeking inside tells a whole different story, with decadent decorations like a huge chandelier and baroque ceiling moulds

This home may look fairly unassuming on the outside, but peeking inside tells a whole different story, with decadent decorations like a huge chandelier and baroque ceiling moulds

They say a man's home is his castle, but in the case of this suburban north American home owner, their garage is their castle

They say a man’s home is his castle, but in the case of this suburban north American home owner, their garage is their castle

When you're listing the desirable features of a potential property, an alchemy lair is surely near the top. Right?

When you’re listing the desirable features of a potential property, an alchemy lair is surely near the top. Right?

Social media users were freaked out by this house, full of stuffed animals, with one saying they didn't want corpses hanging on their walls

Social media users were freaked out by this house, full of stuffed animals, with one saying they didn’t want corpses hanging on their walls

The owners of this home certainly pushed the boat out with their 20,000 gallon aquarium, and sea turtle ceiling decals

The owners of this home certainly pushed the boat out with their 20,000 gallon aquarium, and sea turtle ceiling decals

Commentators felt a bit 'putt out' by this strange work space, which offers workers a chance to practice their golfing skills without leaving the office

Commentators felt a bit ‘putt out’ by this strange work space, which offers workers a chance to practice their golfing skills without leaving the office

Nothing like a good column to add some architectural integrity to a room. Shame this one isn't quite the right size for the beam it's supporting...

Nothing like a good column to add some architectural integrity to a room. Shame this one isn’t quite the right size for the beam it’s supporting…

This unusual home was branded the 'advent calendar house', for obvious reasons. The window cleaning bill must be huge

This unusual home was branded the ‘advent calendar house’, for obvious reasons. The window cleaning bill must be huge

Sometimes you're not sure exactly what style to go for. This designer decided to throw in a load of different styles, leading to a confusing exterior

Sometimes you’re not sure exactly what style to go for. This designer decided to throw in a load of different styles, leading to a confusing exterior

Some people like a more minimalist approach, and choose not to fill their homes with unnecessary junk. When the rooms are this cavernous though, a homely touch would help

Some people like a more minimalist approach, and choose not to fill their homes with unnecessary junk. When the rooms are this cavernous though, a homely touch would help

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Our neighbours host parties to watch football games – can we complain about the noise?

My wife and I are dreading the Euro 2024 football tournament as our neighbours will watch most of the games in their conservatory – a part of the house which seems to amplify noise.

It’ll mean weeks of misery for us.

Often, they have people over watching evening games and it’s just not soundproof at all, with the noise of TV speakers and shouting and cheering going right through us.

For this reason, we really hope England don’t make the final.

We don't want football coming home: Our reader isn't looking forward to the Euros (stock image)

We don’t want football coming home: Our reader isn’t looking forward to the Euros (stock image)

And the noise doesn’t end at full-time – they’ll carry on making a racket until the early hours.

We’re on good terms with them, but when we’ve brought this up in the past they’ll say: ‘Sorry, we’ll keep the noise down’ – but it never happens.

What do we do next? Can we put in an anonymous noise complaint with the authorities they’ll take seriously, but not destroy neighbourly relations?

Jane Denton replies: With the Euro 2024 football tournament having just started and the Wimbledon tennis championships and Paris 2024 Olympic Games just around the corner, this summer has a slew of delights on offer for sports fans. 

However, watching sporting action in a pub, bar or restaurant can be a costly business for consumers. 

Figures published by the Office for National Statistics in May revealed that the average price of a pint across the UK increased by 4.6 per cent to £4.75 in the year to April.  Many punters, particularly in locations like London, pay significantly more. 

Lots of pubs and bars are requiring punters to put down a deposit and make a time-limited booking for a table during the Euro 2024 football tournament. 

With all this is mind, many people, including your neighbours, host their own football-watching parties at home. 

Invariably, such events often spark tensions between neighbours, particularly if the party is not just a one-off and regularly spills over into the early hours of the morning. 

Let’s speak to two experts, the boss of an acoustic consultancy and a solicitor, to establish how best to resolve your noise woes and determine if a complaint to the council is the best course of action. 

The sound man: Ed Clarke

The sound man: Ed Clarke

Ed Clarke, managing director of  Clarke Saunders Acoustics in Winchester, says: We live on a small island, that sometimes feels like it’s getting smaller – population density is increasing, and perhaps our expectations for peace and quiet are on the up, while on the other side of the party wall, consideration for the neighbours is declining.

I encounter many situations which are more about societal interaction than acoustic wave theory and which require more diplomacy and expectation management than complex manipulation of decibels.

Controlling neighbour noise is fundamentally a question of reasonableness, both in practical terms and in the legal application of nuisance legislation. 

The hope is that when reasonable expectations are coupled with reasonable behaviour, although this might involve some compromise, a reasonable outcome is achieved and we can all rub along.

This can break down of course, when sound insulation is incredibly poor, such that even subdued citizens, living very normally, are disturbing their tolerant neighbours. 

When we consider reasonable levels of noisy neighbour activity, fireworks in early November and New Year’s Day tend to be accepted as exceptions to the day-to-day status quo, plus the odd birthday party from time to time. 

Raucous high living of this nature would be unreasonable, indeed actionable, if repeated in the day-to-day. 

But spread over the calendar year this can represent an appropriate balance of give and take.

Euro 2024 will last for one month, during which England will definitely play three group stage matches and up to four knock-out games, many of which are a relatively late kick-off. 

My professional view is that reasonable neighbours might think twice about having ‘watch parties’ for all seven games, especially if they know the sound insulation isn’t great between them and next door. 

Likewise though, if there’s somewhere else in your house that the sound from the conservatory TV doesn’t permeate so badly, it might be reasonable on the odd occasion to seek refuge there, especially if you’ve discussed with the neighbours which evenings they plan to have friends over.

Assuming we are ruling out the possibility of joining in the fun and all watching the football together, the key has to be more communication rather than less. 

Discuss this now and before anyone’s had anything to drink.

Getting the council, lawyers and acoustics experts involved would be the next steps, but would be quite an escalation and not the best use of everyone’s time. 

In the know: Solicitor Tyler Clayton

In the know: Solicitor Tyler Clayton

Tyler Clayton, a solicitor at Fosters Solicitors in Norwich, says: In the first instance, you should try and have another direct, yet friendly conversation with your neighbours. 

Be specific about the impact the noise is having on your lives and suggest practical solutions like reducing the volume, closing windows, or watching the games in another room. 

Follow up your conversation with a polite written request. 

This crystalises your complaint and serves as a reminder. 

That letter should be dated and state the desire to maintain a good relationship, and perhaps it can suggest a compromise. 

If those measures fail, you can in theory make an anonymous noise complaint to your local council or relevant authority, in the hope it might intervene. 

The council could serve a noise abatement notice if enough evidence is gathered to demonstrate the noise is a legal nuisance. 

However, keep in mind that your neighbours will probably work out that you’re the complainant.

Send us your property question 

We’d love to hear from you if you have a property question and want to find out what the experts have to say on the matter. 

Whether you have neighbour woes, are looking to update or move home, or perhaps you can’t decide how to sort out an extension or make a room look bigger, we want to hear from you.

If you are a prospective first-time buyer or already on the housing ladder and have a property quandary, get in touch.

Email editor@thisismoney.co.uk

Please put PROPERTY in the subject line. 

As a final resort, you might consider bringing a claim against the neighbours in an action based on private nuisance. 

To do so, you must have an interest in the land affected by the noise nuisance, which you do as the owners.

A private nuisance is usually caused by a person doing something on their own land, which they are lawfully entitled to do but which becomes a nuisance when the consequences extend to neighbouring land. 

Interference with the enjoyment of the land must be substantial and unreasonable. 

It can arise from a single incident or a longer-term state of affairs. It can be caused by inaction or omission, as well as by some positive activity.

A broad unifying principle in this area of law is the need for reasonableness between neighbours. 

The court would undertake a balancing exercise, weighing up the factors in each case within the overarching principle of reasonableness. 

To assist the court, you would need to record decibel levels at as many points as possible on a routine basis, and possibly record the results in a diarised manner. 

The court is often most interested in quantifiable, ideally irrefutable data.

In this case, an obvious difficulty you face is that the Euros is an isolated, infrequent tournament. 

If a genuine approach from one neighbour to another does improve matters, the court approach might seem disproportionate and also risky if a judge, particularly a football-loving one, finds that you were overreacting. 

It will always be a question of degree of course, so if the noise is genuinely and objectively intolerable, perhaps not limited to the Euros, then it might be the case that a litigated solution seems to be your only option.

Remedies include damages to compensate for loss, or injunctive relief to require the neighbours to stop a continuing nuisance.

Make no mistake – court proceedings are incredibly expensive, so consider that side of things, before taking any action.

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A hilarious tour of the eye-popping £8million house Poundland built – complete with VERY racy statues, pink marble bathrooms, a £200k sprinkler and a pool that doubles as a dance floor!

When Poundland founder Keith Smith commissioned craftsmen to create ten Romanesque statues to stand guard around the retractable swimming pool at his home Ludstone Hall, he was concerned that the breasts of one female figure were too small.

‘He asked for them to be enlarged, and that was fine,’ says his son, Steve Smith, who co-founded the budget store chain with his father in 1990.

‘Trouble was that my mother then thought that the willy of one of the male statues wasn’t big enough, so that had to be enlarged too.’

The Jacobean mansion near the market town of Bridgnorth, in Shropshire, is now on the market for just short of £8million

The Jacobean mansion near the market town of Bridgnorth, in Shropshire, is now on the market for just short of £8million

It’s all in the detail — and there’s plenty of it in this Jacobean mansion near the market town of Bridgnorth, in Shropshire, where the Poundland king and his wife, Maureen, lived for 26 happy years — and which now is on the market for just short of £8million.

The two estate agent firms — Fisher German and Peter James — who have been instructed to sell the house should have no difficulty getting people through the door. On the contrary.

Millionaire Poundland co-founder Steve Smith with wife Tracy. The property is an acquired taste, but it's just as his parents  Keith and Maureen wanted it

Millionaire Poundland co-founder Steve Smith with wife Tracy. The property is an acquired taste, but it’s just as his parents  Keith and Maureen wanted it

The Mail's Mark Palmer in one of the grand reception rooms with its Jacobean features

The Mail’s Mark Palmer in one of the grand reception rooms with its Jacobean features

The problem will be weeding out genuine prospective buyers from those hungry to feast their eyes on the lavish interiors of a house on which no expense has been spared and whose immaculate grounds include a moat (stocked with fish), box hedging in the shape of playing cards, a small army of gnomes and stone animals and a sprinkler system costing in excess of £200,000.

Perhaps the stand-out feature is the indoor swimming pool, which was designed by British Aerospace technicians and has a solid retractable floor which rises from the base in just a few minutes to create a dance floor.

‘When my nan was alive, mum used to put her wheelchair in the centre of the floor and then lower it down a few inches into the water while playing the soundtrack from Titanic,’ says Steve, 61.

Keith Smith, who died aged 79 in 2022, was a draughtsman in a factory in the West Midlands when he met Maureen, who at the time worked on the assembly line at the Ever Ready battery company

Keith Smith, who died aged 79 in 2022, was a draughtsman in a factory in the West Midlands when he met Maureen, who at the time worked on the assembly line at the Ever Ready battery company

Semi-clothed statues around the pool - which also features a handmade oak bar where Keith and Maureen would sit on a stool and have a drink every evening at 6pm

Semi-clothed statues around the pool – which also features a handmade oak bar where Keith and Maureen would sit on a stool and have a drink every evening at 6pm

Beside the pool is a handmade oak bar where every evening at 6pm, Keith and Maureen would sit on a stool and have a drink — a Bell’s whisky and soda for him, a brandy and Babycham for her.

Whoever purchases the house and the 180 acres of gardens and land (plus, for an additional £3million, eight cottages) will be buying into the Poundland story, which has to be one of the most inspiring tales of a small-market trader whose business went on to become a stock market giant that is worth billions today.

Keith Smith, who died aged 79 in 2022, was a draughtsman in a factory in the West Midlands when he met Maureen, who at the time worked on the assembly line at the Ever Ready battery company.

Soon afterwards, and before marrying Keith, Maureen became pregnant and gave birth to Steve. The three of them lived with Keith’s parents in their flat in Willenhall in the West Midlands.

‘There was always a feeling that if you don’t work you don’t eat,’ says Steve. ‘Even when mum and dad eventually got their own place in Willenhall, I remember how we used to paint the threadbare carpet rather than buy a new one. We would share a portion of fish and chips between my mum and dad, me, my brother and sister, and we had a lot of broth.’

Perhaps the stand-out feature is the indoor swimming pool, which was designed by British Aerospace technicians

Perhaps the stand-out feature is the indoor swimming pool, which was designed by British Aerospace technicians

The pool has a solid retractable floor which rises from the base in just a few minutes to create a dance floor

The pool has a solid retractable floor which rises from the base in just a few minutes to create a dance floor

Then, one day, Keith saw a mail order advertisement in a national newspaper for a ‘gross of pens’ (a box of 144 biros) and started selling them one by one to his co-factory workers. In the evenings, he went door to door with his pens and then on Saturdays he hired a small stall at Bilston Market, near Wolverhampton, selling a selection of cheap household goods.

‘He soon realised he was making more on a Saturday than he was all week in the factory,’ says Steve. And, so, the market stall became his place of work — and where Steve and, later, his two siblings spent most of their days and a good number of nights. We couldn’t afford babysitters, so my mum would push me in the pram to the market. As a toddler, I remember them counting out the money on the floor and if there was anything not sold they would put it in the pram and go door to door. We wouldn’t go home until they’d sold everything.’

One tradition at the stall — which would prove to be decisive in the launch of Poundland many years later — was the cardboard box of goodies, all costing 10p.

‘Dad was a shy man and so at 12 noon, he would go to the pub for some Dutch courage. Then he’d stock up the 10p box — and it was emptied almost as fast as he could fill it.’ Cutting out the middle man is no bad thing and so in 1963 Keith started Hooty’s Supplies, a wholesale cash- and-carry business, which became one of the biggest such companies in Europe.

Steve, gifted with the raw instincts of a trader, left school at 16 and opened his own store, Steve’s Discount Market, in West Bromwich.

Mark with Steve at Ludstone Hall's Poundland museum in an converted coach house

Mark with Steve at Ludstone Hall’s Poundland museum in an converted coach house

Then came a shock, when in 1990 Keith sold Hooty’s for £2.5million and announced that he and his wife were moving to Majorca to start a new life — and that the rest of the family should move, too. ‘At first we went along with it but the day before our flight, my wife Tracy started crying and said she wanted to stay in England. So I told Dad that we would come out for a few days but weren’t stopping.’

That was when Steve and his father reminded themselves of the 10p cardboard box and how people couldn’t resist it. He said they should start a whole business on the basis of it. Keith clearly liked the idea and loaned Steve £50,000 to set it up.

As it happened, the new pound coin had just been released and this gave Steve the idea of opening a shop called Poundtime, which morphed into Poundland. The rest is lucrative history. In December 1990, the first Poundland shop opened in the Octagon Shopping Centre in Burton upon Trent in Staffordshire — and took more than £13,000 on its first day, no mean feat when every item for sale was priced at just £1. The family’s second outlet at the Meadowhall Shopping Centre in Sheffield was a phenomenal success, bringing in £150,000 a week – and soon there were more than 200 stores up and down the country, with a turnover of £1billion.

Two figures at the entrance of the swimming pool of Ludstone Hall, which has nine bedrooms, four reception rooms, seven bathrooms and a gatehouse with two further bedrooms

Two figures at the entrance of the swimming pool of Ludstone Hall, which has nine bedrooms, four reception rooms, seven bathrooms and a gatehouse with two further bedrooms

Four-poster and open fireplace in one of the historic property's nine bedrooms

Four-poster and open fireplace in one of the historic property’s nine bedrooms 

The kitchen garden is immaculately kept and features an extensive greenhouse

The kitchen garden is immaculately kept and features an extensive greenhouse

In 2002, the Smiths sold Poundland for £70million.

Precious little of the interior decor at Ludstone Hall emerged from that 10p box — or from a Poundland store for that matter. But everything about it is homely, family-orientated, pristine, proud and, in parts, imbued with a sense of humour. A sign at the back door reads: ‘Please remove your shoes and don’t take a better pair when you leave.’

And I was taken aback when coming across a ghostly old man carrying a tray of drinks, which shakes from time to time, rattling the glasses. This turns out to be a battery-operated, full-size dumb waiter. The no-shoes rule, presumably to preserve the thick cream carpet that runs through the house, is still in place, a throw-back to Steve’s mother.

‘Even when she could afford help, she was never happier than with a mop in one hand and duster in the other. And she did all the cooking,’ says Steve. Mind you, the four-door Aga in the marble kitchen, opposite a red leather banquette and views across the moat and formal gardens beyond, would encourage most people to put on a chef’s apron.

Ludstone Hall first became a private house in the late 1550s when, by an Act of Parliament in the reign of Elizabeth I, the Whitmore family was able to purchase it outright from the Deanery of Bridgnorth. It has had just six owners since then, with a soon to be seventh out there somewhere — possibly a businessman with a young family or a Premier League footballer.

In December 1990, the first Poundland shop opened in the Octagon Shopping Centre in Burton upon Trent in Staffordshire

In December 1990, the first Poundland shop opened in the Octagon Shopping Centre in Burton upon Trent in Staffordshire

A love of wood panelling, gold taps, pink marble, four-poster beds and telephones covered in pink feathers might attract some people. Certainly, it’s an acquired taste, but it’s just as Keith and Maureen — who also died at 79 just 18 months after her husband — wanted it.

There are nine bedrooms, four reception rooms, seven bathrooms and a gatehouse with two further bedrooms. The main bedroom — referred to as the ‘great chamber’ — is a tour de force, with vast fireplace and plasterwork above it depicting Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Next door is the pink en-suite bathroom, with a double bath that can be turned into a whirlpool at the flick of a switch and has star lighting above it. Blinds are operated by remote control.

Gold is an abiding theme, whether it be the taps, the jet-spray nozzles or the chairs. And the his-and-hers dressing room might make Posh and Becks envious — it’s almost the size of half a tennis court and has its own shower room and loo.

The pink en suite bathroom, with a double bath that can be turned into a whirlpool at the flick of a switch

The pink en suite bathroom, with a double bath that can be turned into a whirlpool at the flick of a switch

The main dining room features a 20ft table, which was there when the Smiths bought the house in 1997 for £2.5million. ‘My parents asked the seller if they could buy it,’ says Steve. ‘They were told it would cost £1,000 and so they thought it was a bargain — but it turned out to be £1,000 per foot. So £20,000 for the whole thing.’

A red Sir Giles Gilbert Scott telephone box is positioned next to the old milk shed housing the Poundland Museum. ‘This is not included in the sale,’ says Steve. ‘We will send it all to the Poundland HQ in Walsall – and that will be difficult in many ways.’

The museum is a shrine to Steve’s family and includes old newspaper articles about the business, plus essential items that were sold for £1, such as packets of Tide, Omo and Surf detergent.

Some of the marketing initiatives are on display, such as signs saying that the waiting time to reach the tills is ‘two minutes’.

‘If people see a queue, they might leave the shop. So why not put their minds at rest,’ says Steve, who now runs several businesses, including a bridging loans operation, a mortgage broker, a software company affiliated to 2,000 care homes and a burgeoning mobile phone payments firm, which he hopes will be his next billion-pound empire.

Some people were snooty about Poundland. They thought it cheapened the High Street, lowered the tone — but that never bothered Steve or his father. It paved the way for the proliferation of discount stores on the High Street. Steve says he has had meetings with prime ministers over the years about how to get the economy going — but thinks, sadly, that the British people have lost all faith in politics.

And, by the way, he thinks inheritance tax should be abolished completely — and straight away.

‘If people work hard all their lives and pay tax along the way, why shouldn’t they pass on their wealth rather than give it to the Government?’

What else would Steve or his father before him want to pass on to the next generation?

‘Go and work for someone else and learn how to buy and sell,’ says Steve. ‘And then get the balance right. Be a good dad, a good partner if you have one and a good business person.

‘My dad was all of those things. He hardly ever spent a night apart from my mum and she died of a broken heart once he was gone.’

Steve hopes the new owners of the opulent Poundland house in the Shropshire countryside will share some of the values that his parents held dear — but accepts that some of the decor might be lost along the way.

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Assessing Property Size: What Square Footage Can You Get With The Average UK House Price In Your Area?

Assessing Property Size In The UK

In the United Kingdom, there is a prevailing tendency to gauge the size of residences based on the number of bedrooms rather than square footage. In fact, research indicates that three out of five individuals are unaware of the square footage of their property.

However, a comprehensive analysis conducted by Savills reveals significant variations in property sizes throughout the country. For instance, with the average property price standing at £340,837, this amount would typically afford a studio flat spanning 551 square feet in London, according to the prominent estate agency.

Conversely, in the North East region, the same sum would secure a spacious five-bedroom house measuring 1,955 square feet, nearly four times the size of a comparable property in London.

Best value: Heading to the North East of England is where buyers will get the most from their money

In Scotland, the median house price equates to a sizable investment capable of procuring a generous four-bedroom residence spanning 1,743 square feet. Conversely, in Wales, Yorkshire & The Humber, and the North West, this sum affords a slightly smaller four-bedroom dwelling of approximately 1,500 square feet, while in the East and West Midlands, it accommodates a 1,300 square foot home. In stark contrast, within the South West, £340,837 secures a modest 1,000 square foot property, and in the East, an even more confined 928 square feet.

London presents the most challenging market, where this budget offers the least purchasing power. Following closely, the South East allows for 825 square feet of space or a medium-sized two-bedroom dwelling. Lucian Cook, head of residential research at Savills, emphasizes the profound disparity in purchasing potential across Britain, ranging from compact studio flats in London to spacious four or five-bedroom residences in parts of North East England.

While square footage serves as a critical metric, with a significant portion of Britons unfamiliar with their property’s dimensions, the number of bedrooms remains a traditional indicator of size. Personal preferences, such as a preference for larger kitchens, may influence property selection. For those prioritizing ample space, Easington, County Durham, offers a substantial 2,858 square foot, five-bedroom home, while Rhondda, Wales, and Na h-Eileanan an Iar, Scotland, provide 2,625 and 2,551 square feet, respectively. Conversely, in St Albans, Hertfordshire, £340,837 secures a mere 547 square feet, equivalent to a one-bedroom flat.

The disparity continues in central London, where purchasing power diminishes considerably. In Kensington, the budget accommodates a mere 220 square feet, contrasting with the slightly more spacious 236 square feet in Westminster. Conversely, in Dagenham, the same investment translates to 770 square feet. Three properties currently listed on Rightmove exemplify the diversity within this price range across the UK market.

South of the river: This semi-detached house is located near to three different train stations

South of the river: This semi-detached house is located near to three different train stations

2. Lewisham: One-bed house, £345,000

This one-bedroom property in Lewisham, South London, is on the market for £345,000.

The semi-detached house is set over two floors, and has a private patio.

The property is located near to bus links and amenities, as well as Catford train station.

Edinburgh fringe: This three-bed property is located on the edge of the city, near to the town of Musselburgh

Edinburgh fringe: This three-bed property is located on the edge of the city, near to the town of Musselburgh

3. Edinburgh: Three-bed house, £350,000

This three-bedroom detached house in Edinburgh could be yours for £350,000.

The house, which has a two-car driveway, boasts a large kitchen diner, and is within easy reach of Newcriaghall train station.


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