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A touch of GLASS: Striking, steel-framed window panels are popping up in homes across the country 

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Well, is it finally time for the bi-fold door to concertina to one side and let another glazing style have a look-in?

Because Crittall – dramatic, steel-framed walls of glass, dissected by slim bars – is wooing interiors fans looking to add a more edgy, studio feel to their living space, both indoors and out in 2021.

If you’re not familiar with the name, you’ll certainly recognise the style. Until now, Crittall has been the preserve of urban loft apartments, trendy bars craving an industrial look and historic buildings – including the Houses of Parliament. 

Clear style: An arched screen by Crittall Windows separating off a kitchen

Clear style: An arched screen by Crittall Windows separating off a kitchen

Victorians, the Art Deco movement and Modernists all loved Crittall long before we gave it an Instagram hashtag.

Where did it begin? Enterprising ironmonger Francis Henry Crittall first brought steel windows to the market in 1884, from his workshop in Braintree, Essex. 

By 1909, he had created the Fenestra joint, a super-strong welding bond that allows linear bars to be as slender as possible, ensuring sight lines aren’t intrusive. Steel frames promise reduced noise, good insulation and security.

Francis’s company, Crittall Windows, remains an ongoing homage to British manufacturing, selling worldwide, with just 13 suppliers in the UK trusted to fit its frames.

You’ll need deep pockets to install them though. Authentic Crittall costs around £2,700 per square metre, although the arrival of copycat aluminium frames has made a ‘heritage’ look much more achievable.

Adding Crittall-style elements to your interior via shower screens, doors, even a beautifully arched mirror, offers the look with less noughts on the price tag. 

Interior designer Kelly Hoppen is a huge fan, having used Crittall on design projects across the globe, buying up frames powder-coated in her trademark taupe – although black remains the classic choice.

‘It was really architects that first used them on the outside of buildings and now people have started to use them for open-plan living with a studio look,’ she says.

If you’re lucky enough to have originals in your home – a pretty set of 1930s French doors can fetch hundreds, if not thousands, on eBay – then celebrate them, says Hoppen. ‘Simply make your interior eclectic to enhance them.’

And for those with champagne tastes and lemonade pockets, Hoppen offers up a bargainous hack: humble lead tape, which costs around £10 a roll. ‘It sounds weird coming from me,’ says Hoppen, ‘but it can work, I’ve seen it done really well.’

The biggest downside to all that glass? You’ll need a patient window cleaner.

INTERIOR WINDOW WALLS

Striking, versatile and positively de rigueur, the window wall is coming to a Georgian townhouse or Victorian terrace near you. 

Open-plan living gifts light and space but also increases noise; listening to a thundering washing machine while watching Netflix is a reality many discover when the brickwork has long gone. 

An interior screen offers compromise, a partition that preserves the flow of light and creates stylish zones in the home.

Get the look: A Crittall Innervision internal screen costs from £5,894 including installation.

BYE-BYE BI-FOLD?

Our passion for gleaming panels of glass that seamlessly merge the outdoors with the indoors remains entirely achievable with this look. 

Narrow glazing bars still let light flood in but bring a gridded, utilitarian feel that makes almost any kitchen style, from shaker to minimalist, shine. 

Black double-height French doors with matching fixed panels and a satin brass Art Deco-style handle finish an open-plan kitchen-diner or extension.

Feeling bold? Many companies will let you mix and match panel sizes and spray frames in any colour from the RAL spectrum – telemagenta pink, anyone?

Get the look: Aluminium heritage French doors with fixed side and top panels cost £5,260, including fitting, from 1stfoldingslidingdoors.co.uk.  

IN THE BATHROOM

‘We’ve seen shower screens become statement pieces in the last year,’ says Jodie Andrews, at Crittall Windows. 

One simple panel of framed screen, or a mirror with glazing bars, can be instantly transformative, giving monochrome, marble or grey bathrooms a fresh, urban aesthetic. Ideal for wet rooms.

Get the look: Framed wet room panels cost from £179 each at victoriaplum.com

OPEN-DOOR POLICY

Single MDF or wooden doors are big light blockers in a living space, so replacing them with a transparent alternative lets natural daylight chase shadows away. Affordable and easy to install; there’s no need to tamper with brickwork.

Get the look: A Soho internal door from The Posh Door Company costs £229 (excluding fitting, with hinges and handles extra).

What your home really needs is a… TERRARIUM 

In the mid-1840s, a London doctor called Dr Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward gave the world the terrarium, an ornamental indoor garden in a glass container. 

The word terrarium evolved later, by substituting ‘terre’ (land) for ‘acqua’ (water) into the aquarium.

You should have one of Ward’s inventions because Victoriana is a growing trend. Terrariums are beautiful, fascinating and require little up-keep.

The Urban Botanist supplies ready-assembled miniature gardens, such as the Wardian Bonsai Greenhouse which is on sale for £109.95 - or you can create your own design

The Urban Botanist supplies ready-assembled miniature gardens, such as the Wardian Bonsai Greenhouse which is on sale for £109.95 – or you can create your own design

The ferns, mosses and other plants suitable for this type of cultivation flourish thanks to photosynthesis. 

Light comes through the glass of the container. The water vapour, created by the evaporation of the plants and soil, gathers on the sealed container walls and trickles down to provide moisture. 

If you prefer cacti and succulents, opt for an open terrarium which has to be misted with water.

The Urban Botanist supplies ready-assembled gardens, such as the Wardian Bonsai Greenhouse, (£109.95) or the DIY Grande EcoSystem (£119.95).

If you prefer to create your own design, Waitrose Garden stocks stones, soil, tools and a 5-litre terrarium bottle (£36.99). Wayfair has a lantern-shaped container (£29.99).

A terrarium plant collection costs £29.99 at Crocus.

Anne Ashworth

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Mirrored furniture trend can create the illusion of space in your home

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Mirrored furniture provokes strong emotions. Some see it as the epitome of bad taste, flashy and bling. Others know that mirrors have magic powers.

A mirrored table or cabinet makes a room or a hallway appear more swish and spacious. It’s a trick that bars and restaurants employ to ensure their establishments appear roomier and more inviting — and they can add lustre to your home, too.

Choosing a piece of mirrored furniture also sends out a sign that you are aware of one of the year’s trends — the return of Art Deco, the influential style that emerged in the 1920s. 

Reflections: A mirrored bedside table. The power of the mirror to create an impression has been recognised for centuries

Reflections: A mirrored bedside table. The power of the mirror to create an impression has been recognised for centuries

It blended forms that celebrated modern machinery with decorative elements drawn from Greco-Roman culture and nature. 

The mirror was a favourite material, used on the surfaces of furniture and walls to supply a shimmering silver and gold effect.

Probably the most famous piece of Art Deco architecture is New York’s Chrysler Building. Completed in 1930, its sunburst-patterned stainless steel spire remains one of the key elements of the Manhattan skyline.

Art Deco console tables, drinks trolleys and other items from the era of the building’s construction sell for thousands on auction sites such as 1stdibs underlining the growing appeal of this aesthetic. 

Jamie Watkins, the co-founder of fabric and wallpaper company Divine Savages, explains Art Deco’s allure for a new audience.

‘Art Deco, with its bold geometrical patterns was such an iconic period for design: it’s synonymous with glamour and luxury.’

The resurgent popularity of Art Deco is also based on its practicality: a mirrored piece works with almost any interior, adding interest and depth.

The power of the mirror to create a wow impression has been recognised for centuries. 

Examples of this technique include the round mirror on the wall behind the bride and groom in Jan van Eyck’s 1434 Arnolfini Portrait in the National Gallery. It sends out the message that the couple are discerning — and wealthy.

Cheers: B&M's £25 oval drinks trolley with two mirrored shelves

Cheers: B&M’s £25 oval drinks trolley with two mirrored shelves

The hall of mirrors in the palace of Versailles was designed to be a place of beauty, but also to display the financial resources of Louis XIV, the Sun King. Mirrors were a luxury item until an inexpensive manufacturing process was invented in the 1830s.

In 2022, it is possible to pick up mirrored pieces for under £100. B&M has a £25 oval drinks trolley with two mirrored shelves that would lend an air of Thirties elegance to any gathering. The £94.99 Ellison serving cart (a U.S. term for drinks trolley) from Wayfair has a similar vibe.

If you believe that the right mirrored trolley would save you money on trips to bars, the larger £144.95 gold oval mirrored trolley from Melody Maison could be the thing.

A mirrored cocktail cabinet will dazzle guests. The £1,200 Primrose & Plum champagne and gold cabinet has a Jazz-Age feel.

The £299 Venetian sideboard from Furniture Market, meanwhile, is a more modestly priced way to conjure up the party spirit of the Roaring Twenties.

The show flats of apartment blocks are often equipped with mirrored cocktail cabinets containing bottles of spirits and crystal glasses. This makes buyers dream of dinner parties, with a prelude of aperitifs, but also serves to make the apartment appear even roomier.

A console table in the hall also creates an illusion of space which can be amplified by the addition of a lamp. HomesDirect365 has a range in the style of almost every era including Art Deco, Regency, the 1960s and the 1970s. Prices start at £233.

The bedroom is often the most cramped room in either a house or flat which is why this can be the best place to experiment with mirrored furniture. 

The desire to preserve family harmony is another reason. The other members of your household may prefer the kitchen and living room to be slick and understated, seeing anything mirrored as excessive.

In the bedroom, however, you can indulge your decor fantasies. Habitat has the one-drawer Hepburn bedside table for £76.

Next offers the antique effect Fleur bedside table which costs £225 for the one-drawer version and £275 for the two-drawer version. 

The Fleur is also available as a six-drawer chest for £599 or a £1,150 double wardrobe if you seek to waft around your bedroom channelling your inner 1930s Hollywood screen siren. 

Dunelm’s Venetian mirrored dressing table also offers a chance to live out your dream of silver screen stardom (£449).

If mirrored furniture has brought out your party animal, kindling a passion for Art Deco in every guise, Divine Savages offers Deco Martini wallpaper whose design is based on the geometric forms, with a hidden Martini glass within the print (£150 per roll).

Some of your guests may not be too busy checking out their reflections on the doors of the mirrored cabinet to notice this subtle and witty detail in the wallpaper.

Savings of the week! water jugs… Up to 52% off 

The Sandvig hammered-glass jug from made.com is half-price at £22

The Sandvig hammered-glass jug from made.com is half-price at £22

Sitting outside on a sunny afternoon is already delightful. But it is even more enjoyable if you are sipping on a cool drink or an iced coffee from a generously sized jug, or maybe even a Pimm’s. The arrival of the July sales means bargains abound.

If you prioritise practicality, Ocado’s textured lustre plastic picnic jug has 33 per cent off at £8.

The price of the pleasingly geometric plastic smoky-grey Prism jug from Wayfair is 16 per cent off at £10.10. 

If you would like to feel as if you are in the south of France, John Lewis has the plain glass Arles wicker-wrapped jug. It is reduced from £25 to £12, down 52 per cent.

Wanting something more elegant that you can also use for flowers? The Sandvig hammered-glass jug from made.com is also half-price at £22.

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VGP acquires French logistics development

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VGP NV and VALGO signed an agreement to purchase 32 hectares of land that housed the former Petroplus refining units in Petit-Couronne, near Rouen. This brownfield rehabilitation project is fully in line with VGP’s core expertise and strategy. Thanks to the six years ownership of the site by VALGO and its expertise in asbestos removal, soil and water table decontamination, in-situ waste treatment and development, this area has now become a suitable site for the development of new industries and business activities.

 

On the banks of the river Seine and close to the A13 highway, the 32-hectare area of land offers its future users a highly strategic location. Following the extensive depollution work carried out by VALGO, the site is now ready for redevelopment. VGP expanded into France only a few months ago and is delighted to start its French business activities in the dynamic Rouen Normandy metropolis area, via this major project. In total, around 150,000m² of land are set to be redeveloped to accommodate industrial and logistics projects, with work due to begin in 2023.

 

Jan Van Geet, CEO VGP, said: “VGP is delighted to begin its business activities in France on a site as exceptional as this one, with strong economic and environmental ambitions that are shared by both our partner, VALGO, and the local authorities. As the rehabilitation of brownfield sites is at the heart of our business, this project is a great opportunity for us to deploy our industrial and logistical know-how. The uncertain geopolitical situation and the rise in transport prices mean that companies are increasingly looking for local support to start their business. In this context, we strongly believe in the relevance of our integrated model with a long-term vision. We are now eager to get to work and bring all the expertise of the Group to the project.”

 

Francois Bouche, CEO VALGO, commented: “We are delighted that this huge piece of land has been sold to a major investor with experience in redeveloping brownfields in Europe. However, I would first like to celebrate the work of the men and women who worked so hard to make this colossal project a success. It took more than 1 million hours and over €60m in investment by VALGO to turn the page on over 80 years of refining on this site, which already employs 600 people.”

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Selling your home? Here’s how to make sure it has kerb appeal by sprucing up outside space

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As anyone who has indulged in the brutal ‘swipe left’ culture of internet dating will testify, you don’t often get a second chance to make a first impression. And the same is true when trying to sell your property.

That’s why what lies at the front of your house — be it lawn, gravel or flagstones — can play a major role in making a sale.

Indeed, having a pleasing ‘shop front’ to snag potential buyers scrolling through listings or even walking past outside can offer leverage to boost the asking price, says Colby Short, CEO of estate agent comparison site getagent.co.uk.

Dress to impress: Colourful flower beds transform the look of a cottage in East Lothian, Scotland

Dress to impress: Colourful flower beds transform the look of a cottage in East Lothian, Scotland

‘Homes that offer a front garden carry a 4 per cent property price premium versus those without, and that equates to more than £11,000 in the current market,’ he says.

So what changes can you make to the patch in front of your house to help improve the saleability of the property?

Some alterations are simple, entry-level innovations. For example, even the smallest swatch of grass should be mown and rubbish-free. 

In fact, bins and recycling boxes are often the first thing you see in a front garden, as well as the detritus left by squirrels who have curated bits of dinner from your bags of rubbish. But it’s easy to hide bins away in a box unit.

‘If you’re trying to hide ugly bins, how about building a bin store with a planter on the top, then you can have some gorgeous outdoor succulents and flowering alpines?’ says QVC UK’s gardening expert Michael Perry. 

You can also buy wooden bin stores from outdoor furniture suppliers such as Wayfair (from £125.99).

Meanwhile, hanging baskets outside your front door help to break up a harsh brick wall, says Sean Lade, of Easy Garden Irrigation.

‘Hanging baskets are an excellent choice for adding colour and scent to your front garden and soften the front of your house. They should be installed at eye level —about 5 ft off the ground.’

Hanging baskets add colour and scent to a front garden and soften the front of a house

Hanging baskets add colour and scent to a front garden and soften the front of a house

And think about replacing tired fencing or dilapidated brick walls with natural borders, such as Boxwood hedging, which will add visual interest and is also easy to prune throughout the year.

‘If you prefer a cottage garden appearance, then why not train climbing plants to create natural archways around your front door, porch or gate?’ says Deborah Cobb, product manager at builders’ merchants MKM.

‘Raised flower beds are also a clever way to add some natural foliage. If you fill them with evergreen shrubs, then they are an easy-to-look-after and low-maintenance option that will look good all year round.’

In terms of what plants to go for, Nicola Bird, founder of seed subscription service The Floral Project, suggests some annual flowers are perfect for planting at the front of your house if you’re looking to sell. 

‘They include varieties such as cosmos, phlox, zinnias and sweet peas — not only to bring a bright splash of colour to your front garden, but also serve as a great conversation starter with your potential buyers.’

Even if you don’t have a patch of grass in front of your home, there are other fundamentals which will help with the sale, says Jonathan Rolande, professional property buyer at housebuyfast.co.uk.

This includes jet-washing your path. And just before a visit from potential buyers, remove any vehicles, where possible, to help to create an impression of space.

‘Clean the windows, frames and front doors — and clean the house number,’ he says. ‘If the garden is mostly given over to parking, soften the look with pots and planters filled with bright flowers and attractive shrubs.’

 You may think your garden gnomes are cute, but to a prospective buyer, they can be just plain creepy

He adds that if you don’t have a lawn, terracotta planters on the front sills look great with fragrant plants such as lavender and rosemary appealing to the sense of smell, too.

If your front garden is really small, use decorative gravel such as pea shingle or slate chippings, suggests Thomas Goodman, property expert at homeowner and tradesman connection website myjobquote.co.uk.

‘This will give you an attractive, low-maintenance base for topping with a few nice plant pots.

‘Fix anything that’s broken, including gates, fences and walls. These detract from any nice planting and give the impression of a home that’s not properly maintained and is going to need work.’

Colby Short says some items in your garden should be permanently jettisoned to improve the chances of a sale.

‘You may think your garden gnomes are cute, but to a prospective buyer, they can be just plain creepy. The same goes for any large statues or display items, particularly if they are of a political, religious or risque nature.

‘When it comes to potential buyers, you want to present a blank canvas. But that doesn’t mean this canvas can’t look good and add appeal in its own right.’

On the market… with kerb appeal 

Buckinghamshire: This four bedroom semi-detached cottage is on the edge of Denham Village. The bedrooms are spacious overlooking front and rear gardens. Struttandparker.com, 01753 481 781, £800,000

Buckinghamshire: This four bedroom semi-detached cottage is on the edge of Denham Village. The bedrooms are spacious overlooking front and rear gardens. Struttandparker.com, 01753 481 781, £800,000

Suffolk: There are four bedrooms in this detached house in Old Newton. The property dates from the 16th century and has a thatched roof and mature gardens. Fineandcountry.com, 01379 646 020. £1.2m

Suffolk: There are four bedrooms in this detached house in Old Newton. The property dates from the 16th century and has a thatched roof and mature gardens. Fineandcountry.com, 01379 646 020. £1.2m

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